Chocolate Glaze and Cake Transport Questions
Posted: 08 June 2009 02:13 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi All—

I got so much help from this board on my initial test cakes that I am in good shape for my daughter’s wedding.  All the cakes are baked and they date is coming up.  I am making Mini-Cakes.  I’m using Jeanie’s glaze from this thread:  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/869/

Here is where I am stuck:

The wedding is Saturday.  We have to glaze the cakes on Friday.  When would it be safe to make the glaze?  I would love to get it all made a week or two ahead and just warm the glaze through before glazing the cakes.

The next conundrum is the fact that there is no easy way to keep the cakes in the fridge from 8 am Friday until 8 pm Saturday (when they will be consumed).  The filling is raspberry jam.  Do you think that they will be okay?  I think the cake will be okay but I’m a bit worried about the glaze.

Finally, how does one transport 100 mini cakes?  This seems like an insurmountable problem for me.  By mini I mean that I’m cutting an 8” square pan into 9 pieces each.  we can only make one trip and the reception site is an hour away.

I would also love any thoughts or ideas on the best temp to trim and torte the cakes.  Should I do it while the cakes are frozen?  They’d be pretty sturdy.  Or should I do it when they are cold or at room temperature?

Thanks in advance for any thoughts and ideas. 

Monique.

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Posted: 11 June 2009 07:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I can’t answer the questions concerning Jeanne’s glaze, but I can answer the others for you.  Your raspberry jam filling will be just fine at room temp for that length of time.  Under-the-bed storage boxes lined with non-slip shelf liner (dollar store) will work well for transporting.  You can stack them if needed (I’d tape them together so they don’t slide around).  How are you planning to serve the mini cakes?

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Posted: 11 June 2009 01:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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That’s a great idea about the storage boxes.  I was worried that the plastic smell would get into the cakes.  I guess they will be okay for a day and a half.  It sounds like you never had a problem with your cakes. 

My daughter has bought a bunch of cake plates so we were going to have the service people put a cake on each plate and set them out on a table with a fork until “the time”.  Do you see any problems with that?

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Posted: 11 June 2009 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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You are absolutely right… either get yourself the cardboard storage boxes, or allow plastic ones plenty of time to air out before you put your cupcakes in them (like a week or more).  How do you plan to transport the individual cakes inside the boxes?  Will they be placed on tiny card boards, into little bakery liners, on doilies, etc?

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Posted: 11 June 2009 06:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Do you think they need to be on something?  I just thought maybe some butcher paper (one big sheet lining the box) on top of the shelf liners.

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Posted: 11 June 2009 08:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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That should work.

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Posted: 11 June 2009 08:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Will the glaze be dry to the touch?

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Posted: 15 June 2009 10:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I hope so.  DD’s MIL2B will be decorating them to cover up any problems with the glaze.  Thank you so much for sharing your expertise with me.  I am having trouble coming up with a feasible schedule.  Can you give me some feedback on this?

Wednesday:  Move cakes from freezer to fridge
Thursday:  Trim, torte, apply syrup and jame
Friday:  Cut into final size, glaze and decorate
Saturday:  Transport and eat

I was also thinking I could take the cake directly from the freezer and trim/torte/syrup/jam it.  What does your experience tell you would be a better plan?

Again, thanks for your help.

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Posted: 15 June 2009 10:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I forgot if you are filling the cakes or just spreading jam on them and then glazing them.

If you glaze them while they are frozen, it will go that much faster. 

For set up, I would use a sheet pan (or jelly roll pan) lined with parchment paper.  Then put a cooling rack on top of that. This is where the cakes will sit until you move them onto a board - either a big half sheet board where you will line them up or on mono boards that they make specifically for individual desserts.  You can buy half sheet boards and boxes at a cake supply place or ask at a local bakery if you can buy some from them.  You will want at least 4, if not 5 boxes and 10 boards.  The extra boards are just to have on hand in case you need them.

In terms of glazing the cakes, if you make the glaze in a bowl, and your cakes are frozen when you start to work with them, you can just dunk them in the glaze and tap off the excess with a small, wide pancake turner.  I’ve forgotten if you are layering the cakes with jam or coating them with jam and then glazing them.  Dunking means they will be evenly covered and the mess will be all in getting them out of the glaze and getting rid of the excess.  Then put them on the cooling rack over the parchment.  The glaze will drip onto the parchment, as the cakes sit and it will firm up over time.  Then using a spatula, you move the cakes onto the half sheet board or use a little buttercream or jam on the mono board and put the cake on the mono board.  Then you will just pick up the sheet of parchment, fold it in half like a piece of pizza and then squoosh all the glaze on the sheet back into the bowl.  You can put the bowl over a pan of simmering water just to loosen it up a little and make it more fluid.  Don’t over heat this or it will break.

If this method doesn’t work for you, then put the unglazed cake on the cooling rack (start at the far left corner and work your way down or across, one lane at a time).  Using a ladle, pour some glaze over it.  Because they are square, the corners will be the hard part so I would practice with the dunking method to be honest with you.  Pouring glaze on a round is easier than doing a square.

Keep the cakes frozen to make it easier on yourself.  Work with a dozen or less at a time.

I think you will need to make at minimum 3x the original batch size of the glaze and quite possibly four - so have ingredients on hand to make five batches so you will not stress in case you end up using more glaze than you think.  Make the batches individually instead of all at once, it goes really fast. When you make a fresh batch, after you stir it, add the excess from the previous batch.  Use a strainer set over the fresh batch so you capture any crumbs from the used glaze and sqoosh out the parchment paper into the strainer.

If the worst happens and you are unhappy with the way it comes out, get some good quality cocoa and a fine strainer (like a tea strainer). Very lightly tap some cocoa on the tops and no one will notice any imperfections if there are any.  You want a very light hand with this, otherwise you can end up with a worse mess and big clumps of cocoa instead of a fine dusting smile

Mono boards are available from Pfeil and Holing (http://www.cakedeco.com and probably Country Kitchens and other pastry supply places.
Once the cakes set, then put a dab of jam or buttercream on the mono board and place the cake on it. Use a loop of masking tape to secure the mono board to the half sheet board if you are using that to transport.

I hope this makes sense! smile

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Posted: 16 June 2009 02:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Thanks, Jeanne, for your incredibly thorough reply.  I really like the idea about the cocoa. 

I am taking a one layer cake and cutting it horizontally into thirds, then putting Rose’s brandy syrup and raspberry jam on the inside layers and reassembling the cake before cutting it into mini cakes.  I would love to cut it while it is frozen because I think it would be sturdier but I’m afraid I’m going to crush or break the cakes or it will have some adverse affect on them.  It’s a cake recipe that has quite a lot of fat in it.

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Posted: 30 November 2010 03:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I have been skimming thru this thread and am most interested to hear how it all turned out!! Having individually hand-iced 100 petit fours for my son’s wedding in ‘05, I am now trying to find a more time-efficient method in order to supply something like this on a weekly basis for a cafe. The cakes need to be kept at room temp - and preferably not suffer any deterioration for at least a couple of days (under glass domes). Looking forward to your pictures!

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Posted: 30 November 2010 05:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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The cakes turned out great.  We got some big containers and filled them with cakes that didn’t touch.  I didn’t need to use the cocoa and they were all beautiful (except the white trash decorations on the top).  Because of Bridezilla, I don’t have any pictures of the food or cakes I made and I ended up vacuuming and mopping up the venue at the end of the night because that was the apparent deal that the happy couple made.  It was an opportunity to reflect on the day that just transpired with me waking up at 5 am to endlessly set tables, decorate and coordinate food and people while The Bride didn’t have five minutes to share with me.  No trouble falling asleep when I finally got home and dealt with all the remaining perishables at 2 am.  It was way worse than that but I won’t go into the details here.  All I can say is that it was smart for her to go on her honeymoon so I could have a two week cooling off period.

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Posted: 01 December 2010 02:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Oh Monique I am so sorry to hear that after all your months and months of labour researching testing and perfecting - it really didn’t seeem at all like your contribution was appreciated as it should have been! I can so relate. People have abso-livin-lutely NO CLUE how much toil and tears go into a creation like that! But I am sure they will never forget the wonderful taste of those cakes no matter what! They sounded just divine! Brides do often have a way of turning into Prima Donnas though - even daughters! I guess as moms we have to cut them some slack on “their day” - but after all the work you did I hope yours came around and apologized for being so inconsiderate! I also personally LOATHE it when my elegant cakes are tarted up with tacky garnishes! I usually forbid it if it’s within my control. I also have a meltdown when my cakes are hacked up to smithereens by caterers so they look like a dogs breakfast! I usually offer to be present to serve up the cake - even if I am not invited! Lucky for me all my kids have often seen (and helped!) me working and know all that is entailed (my youngest girl helped me hand-ice the petit fours and decorate them - could not have done it without her!). My son and his bride were just thrilled to pieces with their “Cherry Red” cake and PF’s - thoroughly enjoying the leftover cakes, and I still hear how wonderful it all was. (you can see it at http://www.flickr.com/photos/44733706@N02/page2/). Just to console you - my hubby & I also did a lot of the clean up and food storage after it was over because all the bridal party members left - but thankfully the bride and groom helped too. Guess that’s part of the joys of being the M.O.B… somehow those details always get forgotten. I do hope that it has all become a bittersweet and humorous memory by this time… and perhaps if you ever make the cakes again for some lucky recipient you can post a photo. Meantime - I thank you for all the good info which I can certainly use!

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Posted: 01 December 2010 12:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Thanks for such a nice post Kuchenbakker.  I appreciate your sensitivity.  The bride and groom had left before the clean up.  They agreed it would be done but didn’t tell me so I went to leave and it was like What?  I need to vacuum and mop?  Freaking glorious end.  I got over being mad about it a long time ago and, fortunately, I have a GREAT son in law who I love to be around. 

Your cakes are BEAUTIFUL!!!  They must have been so much work.  Since it was summer, I stored the glazed cakes in the basement and the glaze stayed nice.  Let me know if you have any more questions.  I did make and freeze the cakes uncut and thawed them in the fridge.  It was the best cake/filling/glaze combination I ever tasted.  They were completely divine.

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