Time for Baking?
Posted: 08 June 2009 06:08 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I love to bake.  I live in Colorado, so baking bread can be a challenge.  I got the Bread Bible on Saturday and started yesterday with the White Sandwich Bread Recipe.  It took me almost 12 hours for that recipe!  Did I do something wrong?  I let the starter sit for 4 hours before putting on the “flour blanket”, then I let that sit for 4 more hours.  Then I mixed it, let it raise for 2 hours, took it out, put it back in for another 2 hours, and then let it raise in the pans for 2 more hours in my oven (in the warming drawer) and cooked it for 50 minutes.  I work two jobs (60-70 hours a week).  Is there an easier way to get the same results?

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Posted: 08 June 2009 06:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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It takes some forethought, but the easiest way is to break it over a few days.  For example, make the sponge the night before, do the last shaped rise in the fridge overnight.  Also, keep in mind the book is full of breads with all sorts of different times frames—from 1 hour to several days. This one is one of the more time-consuming sandwich breads.

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Posted: 08 June 2009 06:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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So I can put the dough in the pan…then put it in the fridge over night…then take it out and bake it in the morning?  Does it rise while it is in the fridge over night?  Sorry, I’m new at this.  I was trying to follow the directions very carefully to make sure it would rise properly.  If I can cut down on the amount of time, that would be awesome.

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Posted: 08 June 2009 06:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Oh, forgot to add, you did do the blanket part wrong.  That goes on top of the sponge immediately, and sits at room temperature for a max of 4 hours total. To break it up, let it sit at room temp about an hour and then stick it in the fridge overnight and work on it the next day.

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Posted: 08 June 2009 06:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Yes, there are instructions somewhere in the book for doing this.  It will rise overnight in the fridge.  You just let it sit out of the fridge for about an hour before baking.

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Posted: 08 June 2009 06:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hi Terri,

Welcome to the blog and to bread baking.  Take heart - it will just take a little practice for you to make the bread work around your schedule rather than the other way round.  Matthew suggests that you put the dough in the fridge - you can do this at various stages in the process and you can leave it there for up to a few days in some circumstances.  On the blog is a recipe for no-knead bread - here’s the link
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2006/12/no_knead_bread_nirvana_conclus.html

Also, do a search on ‘no-knead bread’ and you’ll get lots of additional information.

This bread is very flexible and totally easy to make.  I suggest you follow the recipe exactly the first time you make it and then you can start experimenting to make it fit in with your schedule.  There are lots of bread bakers here on the forum so ask any questions you may have and we’ll try to answer them.

Annie

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Posted: 09 June 2009 12:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thank you Annie!  I was a little discouraged yesterday to say the least.  When I went down to bake it the loaves hadn’t risen at all in the pans…that’s when I remembered I had a “bread proofer” in my warming drawer and stuck them in there for two hours.  So instead of letting everything sit out for two hours at a time, I can put it in my refrigerator, and get back to it the next day?  That sounds better.  Except for proofing the dough before baking, that has to go in my warming drawer for two hours, then I can bake it for 50 minutes.  But that’s only 3 hours…much better than 12! 

P.S.  I just got the Pie and Pastry Bible in the mail yesterday.  You are probably going to be seeing a lot of me on these blogs…

Terri

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Posted: 09 June 2009 01:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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TERRI~O:
  Good morning to you & welcome to our baking forum. I see you have received some excellent suggestions on bread baking techniques.
Terri…just to answer your ???? “DID I DO SOMETHING WRONG”.  Well Terri, you did if you didn’t take into account for the elevation that Colorado sits in. Mile~ Hi more or less. You didn’t say wether or not you made any adjustments for it.

  Good luck Terri in your bread baking. You did come to the right place. Enjoy the rest of the day as well.

~FRESHKID.

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Posted: 09 June 2009 01:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Freshkid- I live in the city of Denver.  I hardly ever make changes for high altitude…isn’t that only over 5,000 feet?  If I am making brownies or a cake from a box (don’t tell anyone) and it tells me to add 1/4 cup of flour to dry mix, I do that, but otherwise, I don’t really take that into consideration.  The bread did raise (after I put it in my warming drawer for the last rise), so I didn’t have any problems there.  It was the length of time it took to get it there.  But I understand what I did wrong.  Thanks for your advice.  You will see me on here quite often…I plan to forge ahead and continue the journey!

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Posted: 09 June 2009 02:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Hi Terri,

Great - I like your spirit!  As both the Bibles are new to you be sure and go over the corrections.  Here are the links:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2006/02/corrections_the_bread_bible.html
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2007/07/corrections_the_pie_and_pastry.html

There are some fabulous recipes in both books.  Rose’s Cream Cheese flaky pastry is a great pie crust and is the base for many of the wonderful pies.  She has changed the required liquid from water to cream - here’s the link for that:

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2005/10/roses_favorite_flaky_tender_pi.html

Purely personal favourites are the Stud Muffin (addictive) from the Bread Bible and the Rhubarb/Strawberry tart or Cherry Lattice from the Pastry Bible - can’t choose between them!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84e71BdlfoQ&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9dBWhp3T4A&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5hPdLC1UnA&feature=related

Above are YouTube links of Rose making the Pie Crust mentioned and the Cherry Pie.

Have fun!
Annie

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