12x18x2 white velvet cake
Posted: 22 June 2009 01:32 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi all,

  I’m going to bake the white velvet cake in a 12x18x2 cake as the title of this thread suggests. I have never baked a cake this large before so I wanted to get some pointers for large cakes.

  I’m still confused about the best method for even baking. Do you folks prefer the rose nail trick or using the funny looking cup from Wilton?

  The cup confuses me. It looks like I’m supposed to pour some of the batter in the cup, place the cup in the middle of the pan, and then pour the remaining batter around the cup. But then isn’t there a hole in the middle of the cake that gets filled in with the cake from the cup?

  With the flower nail trick, do I just use one nail in the center? And do I put it in the pan after all the batter has been poured?

  I’m also assuming I still use parchment paper regardless of which method is used. Is this correct?

  Do I need to use the baking strips, too?If so, is it okay to have them overlapping a little bit or is it better if there is a small section where there is no strip between the batter and the pan if the strips are not exactly 60” in length?

  Last question here. If I have two of these pans can I bake them at the same time? I have a regular household oven (GE I think. I can clarify tomorrow).

Thanks for reading this and any tips or advice will be greatly appreciated.

-Matthew smile

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Posted: 22 June 2009 02:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi Matthew. I have baked this size cake before, and it works well for large parties. I have never used a nail or a cup, so I can’t give you advice on that. I have used baking strips, and I let them overlap without any problem. I always line the pan with parchment paper.

Do you have a convection function on your oven? That would be the way I’d recommend if you want to bake both pans at the same time. Just be sure to lower the oven temperature by 25 degrees F. If you don’t have convection, you are going to have to keep a closer eye on them and be sure to rotate them for even baking.

When it comes time to stack the layers, I highly recommend that you freeze them first, on a flat cutting board or a cake board. This way, you minimize the risk of cracking and breaking as you manipulate them into place. Let the cake thaw completely before you put the final coat of icing on the outside. This way, the cake has a chance to settle into place and you’ll minimize the chance of cracks or bulges in your final coat.

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Posted: 22 June 2009 09:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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on a cake this size I used 2 flower nails, both in the center but spread out (equal amounts of batter around each). I just spray them with bakers joy and then push them into the batter (which is already poured).

oh, I spay pan with bakers joy, then put parchment down, then spray it again. I never baked 2 layers at once, always seperate (maybe becuase I only have 1 pan!)

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Posted: 22 June 2009 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Matthew, I would bake one layer at a time. It will bake evenly and you will not have to stress over rotating pans etc. Also, will your mixer be able to handle a double batch of batter for the two 12x18 pans? One layer is 7x or 8x the Rose Factor and two layers will be 14x or 16x the RF.
There was an error in the chart for the rectangular cakes. They make only one layer and not two. Just thought I’d mention that in case you hadn’t read it.

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Posted: 22 June 2009 03:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thanks for the advice, folks.

Ski - When you use two flower nails did you just create an imaginary line down the middle and put one nail in the center of each 9x12 section of the pan?

I do not have a convection oven. It sounds like making one layer at a time will be best. I have a good size stand mixer now but making two batches of batter at once will be a bit much for the mixer. It only has a 12 cup capacity and I believe one batch for this size of a pan requires 7-8 cups. I knew the chart had an error about one layer versus two layers but still think about the total capacity of my mixer.

That brings me to my next question. Could someone please confirm that I have interpreted the rose factor and base formula chart correctly? If I understand this correctly, I will multiply the base formula for the white cake by 7-8 for a 12x18x2 pan (i.e. 800 g flour, 800 g sugar, et cetera). Then I will add a little more than six grams of baking powder according to that chart. Is this correct?

Thanks again for the help here, everyone.

-Matthew smile

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Posted: 22 June 2009 05:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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yea thats what I do. It doesnt really matter becuase the nails are going to come out, its just to ensure it will bake evenly so just use your eye and try to make them equal distance away from each other and away from the side of the pan. I think some people even use 1 flower nail in the center and it works (i like to use 2 though)

I just made a 1/2 sheet cake (12x18x2) and I made 2 layers of rose factor x 7.  When I stacked the 2 layers it was VERY tall (didn’t even fit in the 14x19inch box! I had to tape the top UP so it didn’t hit the flowers). SO i would suggest you do 7x’s the rose factor, not 8 lol.  i dont have my book on me to check your calculations, so maybe someone else can help lol.

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Posted: 22 June 2009 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Matthew, yes, multiply all the ingredients by 7 or 8. If you do 7x the RF you will need 8.75t of baking powder and for 8x the RF you will need 10t of baking powder. Hope that helps.

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Posted: 22 June 2009 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thanks again for the replies, Ski and Rozanne.

Ski - I plan on making two half-sheets but they will not be stacked. I plan on leveling them before frosting, though. Therefore I was thinking the I should use the RF 8 instead of 7. Did you level your layers before stacking and still have a cake that was a little too tall? If so, what was the approximate thickness of your layers after you leveled them?

Thanks,
Matthew smile

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Posted: 23 June 2009 09:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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no they were perfectly level after they baked (thanks to magic stips and flower nails) there was no need to do anything to the layers.  They were perfect.

In my opinion one layer would have been too thin…and i like fillings in my cake lol.  I am going to guess one layer of mine using RF7 was about 2 inches high. Using RF7 and 2 layers with filling in the middle made a very tall (but not freakishly looking) cake.  Rose factor 8 will be even taller if you stack 2 layers! then it probably wont fit in the box lol.
If you make only 1 layer using rose factor 8 I have no idea how tall it would be. Again, I think the RF7 was around 2 inches high…

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Posted: 23 June 2009 04:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Thanks for your input, Ski. I ended up using the RF 8 instead of the 7 and two flower nails (as you suggested) for the test run last night. The cake turned out pretty good.  My friends have requested two one-layer 12x18 cakes so I figured I should use the 8 rather than the 7. I think if I were stacking them then I would use the 7 as you recommended. I’m going to level the cake and see what it looks like after it has been frosted before I decide whether or not to level the cakes being made for this weekend.

Thanks for all the help here, folks.

-Matthew smile

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Posted: 23 June 2009 04:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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did the layer not come out level?  How tall is the layer with RF8?

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Posted: 24 June 2009 09:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Ski - I baked the cake the other night and the top had a little bit of a dome but not as severe as the dome I get on my round cakes. After talking with my friends that I’m making the cakes for this weekend we decided not to level the cakes. I would probably level them if I were stacking them. But since I’m not stacking them I won’t level these cakes. I’ve just been in the habit of leveling my cakes since I stack them. I found that when I don’t level them before stacking them then assembling the layers and frosting them is a lot more difficult. Plus, when I level the cake I get to taste a sample of the cake before I serve it to others and make sure everything is good to go.

Rozanne - I am so glad you pointed out that the baking powder needed to be multiplied by the RF, too. I thought the baking powder had a separate table of weights and measurements from the base formulas because it remained constant. I would have had way too little baking powder in the cake.

Thanks for the help, everyone. I really appreciate it.

-Matthew smile

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Posted: 30 June 2009 09:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I use the Wilton cups in my large cakes and also in a 10” or 12” cake. You spray them inside and out with vegetable spray, place in the middle of the pan and fill around them; them spoon about the same amount of batter height wise into the cup. When you take the cake out, take the plug, turn it upside down and out comes the plug and that’s what you fill the hole with. Works like a charm and your cake bakes faster because the heat is distributed evenly. It’s like the nail you put in your baked potatoes to make them bake faster.

Colleen

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Posted: 17 July 2009 12:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Rozanne, Thanks for the help regarding the Rose factors and Baking Powder. I don’t know why it has always been so unclear to me to multiply the Base level amounts of baking powder in the chart by the Rose factor. Before I started all of my Wedding test cakes several months ago, I thought the level that each size pan falls into remained a constant. Thank goodness I didn’t start practicing my 12 inch layer until I found this out. By the way, I also tested Carol Walter’s Yellow Cake, and baked it in a 12x2 inch pan. It came out great without fussing with the baking powder….there was one tablespoon.  It also worked perfectly with 2-9x2” pans. I also halved the recipe and made 2-6x2 inch pans. I think once you understand the ratios of flour to baking powder (1-1 1/4 tsp per cup of flour) I’ve found most recipes in balance work without going nuts with the chart. I say this with great respect and admiration to Rose.

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Posted: 17 July 2009 06:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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You’re welcome smile  I’m glad I could help in some small way.

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