Chocolate plastique
Posted: 03 July 2009 07:21 AM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2009-04-19

Can anyone give me a tried and tested recipe for chocolate plastique? I have tried several times now - both white and dark - and just can’t get it quite right. I am using 8oz chocolate with 1/4 cup corn syrup for white choc and 1/3 cup corn syrup for dark chocolate.. It hardens well in the fridge but the second I try to mold it…it is all greasy and “flops”!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 July 2009 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1012
Joined  2007-11-21

I do have a recipe, but not with me.  When I get to my book, and then back to a computer, I will post it for you…but if you have access to Toba Garrett’s “The Well Decorated Cake” the recipe in there works just fine.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 July 2009 02:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

Gerry, I had instant success with Rose’s modeling chocolate using the recipe on pp 325-6 TBC for making roses. Chocolate modeling paste is also known as chocolate pastic or plastique aka chocolate clay, chocolate leather and maybe other terms as well! Her proportions for 8 roses are 6 oz. summer coating chocolate with varying amounts of corn syrup, depending on whether you’re using coloured, white or dark bittersweet chocolate. It’s important to note that summer coating chocolate, also known as compound chocolate or chocolate melts, is a different animal from couverture, which I think is what you’ve been using.

Toba Garrett’s formula that Bill mentioned uses couverture, I believe. Her proportions are 1 pound chocolate with 5 fluid ounces (7.5 oz or 210 grams by weight) of light corn syrup. Less for white or milk chocolate. At least, I assume it’s the same formula. My version is from her book Professional Cake Decorating, which I haven’t tried since I was so happy with Rose’s recipe. And bonus! The compound chocolate is less expensive than couverture, while being more than adequate in terms of quality for hand modeling purposes.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 July 2009 09:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2009-04-19

Thanks for the responses, will try again with the recipe in TCB and would also appreciate the one from the other book mentioned. At the moment…all I have are wilting roses!!!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 July 2009 11:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

Here are the instructions for Toba Garrett’s chocolate plastic:

1. Chop chocolate finely and place in a bowl over simmering water. Stir to melt chocolate evenly. When three-quarters melted, remove from heat. Continue stirring until all the pieces are melted.
2. Use a rubber spatula to stir in the corn syrup. Continue to stir until the chocolate starts to leave the sides of the bowl (about 60 seconds for dark chocolate, 20 to 30 seconds for white or milk chocolate).
3. Scrape chocolate mixture onto plastic wrap and spread out to about 1/2 inch thick. Place another piece of plastic wrap directly on top. Refrigerate or let rest in a cool place for 24 hours.
4. Once aged, cut into smaller pieces. Microwave the pieces for just a few seconds to take off the hard edge. Knead thoroughly with the heels of your hands until the chocolate has elasticity and a shiny coat. Wrap in plastic wrap until ready to use.

Keeps for several weeks without refrigeration provided it is placed in a cool, dry area.

For white or milk chocolate, use 1 oz less than you would for dark chocolate. Thus, use 4 fl. oz corn syrup or 6 oz/168 grams by weight for 1 lb. white or milk chocolate.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 July 2009 07:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  625
Joined  2007-11-27

I make choc plastique in the microwave but you have to be supremely careful not to scorch the chocolate, especially using white chocolate.  Short bursts to melt and stop before it is completely melted; and while I’m waiting for the residual heat to melt all the chocolate, I zap the corn syrup for a few seconds to warm that up.

To salvage that batch that is too greasy (too much corn syrup), you can knead in confectioner’s sugar or blot it with a paper towel if you are keeping it at rm temp.  You might even need to do both. Sometimes this can happen even with a formula you have been using for years, and it’s usually because there’s too much corn syrup.

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 July 2009 07:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2009-04-19

Thanks to all for the advice I will try both ways and let you know how i get on!!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 July 2009 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  86
Joined  2008-04-23

The consistency of modeling chocolate seems to vary a lot with the specific type of chocolate. Fortunately, you can adjust the texture after the dough is made by kneading in more corn syrup to soften it, or more melted chocolate to stiffen it.

Cathy

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 July 2009 06:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  935
Joined  2009-05-25

I recently made roses for La Porcelaine and found that placing some silica gel packets in a container with the roses helped to dry them up.  Although, it sounds as if you’re wilting roses wouldn’t make it that long.  It was quite humid and they would not dry, so I thought I didn’t have much to lose.  You can also buy silica gel in large amounts and put in a bowl in the same container.  I also put some in the box when I took my cake out of the fridge—no condensation issues at all!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 July 2009 06:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2009-04-19

Thanks you for this advice, will certainly use it next time as our humidity here in Malaysia is mega high!!

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top