2 of 2
2
3-Tier Wedding Cheesecake and frosting questions
Posted: 15 July 2009 11:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  8
Joined  2009-07-13

Yes, the Neuchatel style is 1/3 less fat, I think the box says.  I hope that’s been the problem. Yes, the cakes are for Saturday. I have taken the day off and will do the baking today. As far as sour cream goes, my choice is pretty limited.  I have been using Daisy Sour Cream because that was the only brand sold at the store, other than the store brand, and I generally shy away from that when baking for an occasion such as this.  What I bought is already at room temperature and even if I am able to find something different I’m running out of time, since I understand that all ingredients are supposed to be at room temperature.  I live in west Texas, and sometimes my choices are somewhat limited. 

Thanks for your ongoing “tutelage”... smile

JanHen

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 July 2009 11:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4698
Joined  2008-04-16

Neufchatel is not cream cheese, it is a lower-fat cheese similar to cream cheese.  It will not work as well, and is probably the cause of both the softness of the custard and the weeping.  Use Philadelphia brand, the original, which has less water than Neufchatel and has emulsifiers, which result in a creamier, non-weeping texture.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 July 2009 12:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  8
Joined  2009-07-13

Yea!  Thanks for the clarification, Julie!  I did buy regular Philly Cream Cheese last night, in the hope that the Neufchatel might be one of the causes of my problems.  I really had no idea there was such a big difference; I just thought that Neufchatel had less fat.

Thanks,
JanHen

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 July 2009 12:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1055
Joined  2007-11-15

I haven’t had any problems with Daisy brand.  I’m curious why you were told not to use it.  I do use Breakstone as well.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 July 2009 05:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  290
Joined  2007-11-16

The person who told me to avoid Daisey brand said it was not as thick as Breakstone.  I probably should try it myself and check out the results, a good excuse to make a cheesecake, LOL.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 15 July 2009 06:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2613
Joined  2007-11-15

I haven’t noticed a difference between the two brands either.

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 July 2009 01:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  170
Joined  2008-04-29

I agree wholeheartedly with MrsM and the others that the light cream cheese (Neuchatel style) is the culprit. All you have to do is look at the two products side by side—one looks more like cheese, and one looks more aerated, like whipped cream cheese. and even if the only difference was less fat, that still make a huge difference in a custard recipe, and is surely the cause of the squishy-ness.

Also, on flavor, cheesecake has so few flavors and ingredients you must not substitute (in my book). I am not normally a brand whore when baking, but Philadelhpia Original Cream Cheese is the only one I will use for cream cheese icing, and for cheesecakes. I have experimented with organic, cultured, low-fat, high-end and low-end cream cheese…..and I keep coming back to Philly. It really has the best flavor and texture for baked goods.

Luckily Philly is available everywhere, unlike some of our other favorite baking ingredients.

I have not noticed a difference between sour creams as much, and I have used Daisy for this cheesecake.

JanHen, let us know how it goes! I want someone to request a wedding cheesecake from me, so I get to make one.

 Signature 

http://scratch.typepad.com/
http://www.milkglassbaking.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 July 2009 06:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  8
Joined  2009-07-13

I certainly appreciate everyone’s comments! I’ll post a picture once it’s completed, if that’s do-able.  I used Philadelphia Cream Cheese and Daisy Sour Cream after reading everyone’s comments.  They have retained their firmness and I was able to turn them out without any problem.  They look very nice…no drooping or sagging.  Too bad I can’t taste them without cutting in to them like I would be able to if I were leveling a regular cake.  smile  Now my big problem is “weeping”.  Whenever I’ve pulled the cakes out of the fridge to check on them, they’re weeping at the base.  Is there a way to stop this?  I will be frosting them tomorrow morning with Rose’s white chocolate buttercream frosting, and piping a simple border.  I’m stressing that the border will look like mush by the time of the reception.  Suggestions?  Comments?  Solutions? 

Thanks everyone!
JanHen

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 July 2009 06:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1055
Joined  2007-11-15

Hmm, I would probably set them on top of thin layers of sponge cake, which you can cover with the frosting later when you pipe.  The sponge cake would absorb any moisture coming out of the cakes.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 July 2009 07:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

Sponge cake is a great suggestion. Right on, Matthew! There’s a particular sponge that is so easy to make, that Rose recommends as a base for her cheesecake. That’s the Biscuit Roulade on pp. 142 to 144, TCB. You can make it in a jiffy, and I promise that you really can outline the circles the way she describes and then cut them with your scissors!

I wouldn’t use any syrup with them. They’ll sop up all of that weeping liquid from the cheesecakes instead, and be all the more tasty for it. Rose used the almond biscuit as the base for her Golden Glory Wedding Cheesecake. But there other options, including just the basic recipe flavoured with vanilla. Have a look at TCB and see if that or one of the variations “speaks” to you.

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 2
2
Back to top