1 of 2
1
Buttermilk powder
Posted: 18 July 2009 06:10 PM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1442
Joined  2008-09-27

Has anyone used this (reconstituted) as a replacement for buttermilk?

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 July 2009 07:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

Yep! I’ve used it mainly in scone and muffin mixes. No problem! A yummy result that’s more convenient than fresh buttermilk to store and worry about the shelf life. The only time I found the reconstituted buttermilk didn’t work was to produce creme fraiche with Rose’s recipe.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 July 2009 02:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1442
Joined  2008-09-27
Carolita - 18 July 2009 10:19 PM

Yep! I’ve used it mainly in scone and muffin mixes. No problem! A yummy result that’s more convenient than fresh buttermilk to store and worry about the shelf life. The only time I found the reconstituted buttermilk didn’t work was to produce creme fraiche with Rose’s recipe.

Cool, I bought a can today.  Are there any other dried products that can usefully substitute for perishable goods?  It makes me feel powerful to have everything I need, always.  grin


Thank you!

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 July 2009 05:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  794
Joined  2007-11-15

I don’t think this product is available here in the UK, otherwise I would get it too!  I’ve never seen it anyway.  However I believe it is quite easy to make your own buttermilk by adding lemon juice to milk and leaving it for a little while, I’ve never done it like that but I’ve heard it works well.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 July 2009 11:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  682
Joined  2008-01-24

Perhaps a bit more than you asked for but this is the best info on buttermilk I have seen…
http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/Cheese/BUTTERMILK.HTM

As the learned professor points out modern cultured buttermilk is made by simply culturing milk with streptococcus lactis. Which is different from the common bulgaricus etc used to make yogurt. I like the different flavor so I keep buttermilk in stock and I use it with fruit and granola. The dried is a pretty good substitute in a pinch but like powdered milk is not as good as the real thing.

 Signature 

“This pizza is a symphony of flavors”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 July 2009 06:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  535
Joined  2008-05-03

Jeannette, You can buy buttermilk powder in the UK from flourbin.com.  Here’s the link:
http://www.flourbin.com

Annie

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 July 2009 09:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2613
Joined  2007-11-15

I’m so glad to read this post… I’ve wondered about the powdered buttermilk so many times.  I usually just make my own like Jeannette described.

 Signature 

Come visit me at

Blog:  http://butteryum.org
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ButterYum
Pinterest:  http://www.pinterest.com/butteryum/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ButterYum.ATastyLittleFoodBlog

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 July 2009 12:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1012
Joined  2007-11-21

I’ve used the powdered at times, but doesn’t compare to the real thing.  I usually pick up a container of butter milk…I make biscuits and pancakes with it quite often…I rarely finish the container before it goes bad but I don’t mind the little bit of waste, the products made with it are delicious.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 July 2009 04:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  794
Joined  2007-11-15

Just seen your message about buttermilk powder, Annie.  Have you used this company yourself and do you recommend them?  Have you used the powder also?  It would be useful to know of a supplier of some more obscure items, I can get most things but not everything!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 July 2009 06:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  535
Joined  2008-05-03

Jeannette, firstly I agree with Bill that the powder isn’t as good as the real thing.  I buy buttermilk in Tesco so rarely use the dried but have it just in case.  I have only ordered once from flourbin.com as they charge exorbitant fees to ship to the Highlands & Islands.  For you it will be fine as you are in the centre of civilization!  However, they do have hard-to-get items such as Vital Wheat Gluten - the only source I’ve found in the UK.  They also have French Type 45 flour for pattiserie which is probably the nearest thing to cake flour available here.

Annie

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 July 2009 01:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

I have used soured milk (with lemon juice or vinegar) in pancakes and such, but have to agree with Bill and others that there’s nothing like the real thing. Fortunately, buttermilk in a half-litre size is readily available in my local supermarkets. Even so, it can often approach its “best by” date without my having plans for the balance. When that happens, I pop it in the freezer. It needs a good shake after thawing in the fridge to get the liquid and fat reunited again. But it works.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 July 2009 12:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1428
Joined  2007-11-18
Carolita - 23 July 2009 04:27 AM

Even so, it can often approach its “best by” date without my having plans for the balance. When that happens, I pop it in the freezer. It needs a good shake after thawing in the fridge to get the liquid and fat reunited again. But it works.

Thank you Carol. I always wondered if buttermilk could be frozen. I should have just tested it myself but never got around to doing it. What brand is the half-litre size?

 Signature 

http://heavenlycakesenjoyedonearth.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 July 2009 12:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  794
Joined  2007-11-15

I think that is a good idea to freeze it, I shall have to try it too.  I can buy 300ml cartons in a local supermarket, if I can freeze it I will get a few and have a ready supply in the freezer.  What would we do without our freezers!  LOL

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 July 2009 02:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

Yep, the freezer is my friend! Especially if going on vacation and not wanting to waste perishables. But all the time really, maybe because I have Scottish blood in my veins. smile Buttermilk, yogurt and sour cream can all be frozen and then used after defrosting in the fridge. Sometimes the texture is affected. But it’s often revived by giving the container a good shake or put contents in the blender briefly. Even frozen whipping cream can be whipped, if you add a few drops (no more) of lemon juice. Never gives the same volume as fresh, of course. Read somewhere on the forum or in Rose’s books that it can be frozen whipped. Might try that someday when I have extra, though I’m always more tempted to make creme fraiche. Love the stuff!

Rozanne, the fresh buttermilk brand I use is Island Farms, a local dairy here on Vancouver Island. It comes in the L and 500 ml size (2% M.F.).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2009 09:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4698
Joined  2008-04-16

I think that freezing milk and cream only works in certain situations.  According to Harold McGee, when dairy products are frozen, fat and ice crystals pierce the fat membranes, and you get separation of fat into grains of butter, or, if you heat the defrosted milk, the butter grains liquefy and pool on top.  In my experience, cream that has been frozen and defrosted will not whip properly, and will separate when added to heated mixtures, like sauces or custards.

I have had excellent results with freezing cakes that are frosted and decorated with gelatin-stabilized whipped cream, or chocolate-stabilized whipped cream (light whipped ganache), including ice cream cakes.  This only works with the frosted cake, i.e., you can’t make the gelatin-stabilized whipped cream, freeze it in a bowl (like you would buttercream), and then defrost it and use it to frost a cake. 

On the other hand, I have successfully made Rose’s cream cheese pie crust with defrosted cream cheese.  And, I haven’t done it, but it seems like it would be worth a try to see if defrosted milk/buttermilk could be used in a butter cake batter, as the eggs may be enough emulsifier to hold all the diffferent components in suspension, including the separated fat from the frozen dairy.

Carolita, it’s interesting to think about your trick of using lemon juice on defrosted cream, I wonder if it denatures the proteins enough to enable them to surround air pockets, much like heating milk allows it to be frothed for a cappucino…

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2009 10:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

I am always happy to stand corrected and learn more on matters of research—information I’ve gleaned from a written source. But on the milk issue, Julie, I can speak from personal experience. My ex and I were posted to England in the early ‘90s and through his work, we were permitted to shop at the American base food stores which are heavily subsidized by your government. Imagine getting butter at 35 cents/pound! Other deals too numerous to mention. It didn’t make sense to own a car overseas because of the excellent subway service where we lived and worked. So every three or four months, we rented a vehicle and drove to one of the bigger U.S. bases where there would be the most choice in goods available.

We’d come back with the trunk and back seat loaded! Food mostly and always, several 4 quart jugs of 2% milk. Into the freezer, they went. When the jug in the fridge was getting low, I’d pull another from the freezer and tuck it in the fridge to thaw. With the milk, I didn’t even have to shake or otherwise amalgamate the milk fat and liquid. But I would give the jug a little shake, just from force of habit to get any last ice crystals mixed in. No problem drinking “as is” and no problem reheating for other purposes.

The frozen, whipped cream idea is one that I saw on the forum or Rose’s blog. As I said, haven’t tried it myself. But the idea was not to whip and leave it as a lump, thaw and use. Rather, the person said to pipe or mound it in preferred portion sizes on a parchment-lined sheet, freeze and then bag for later use to top puddings, etc. (Sorry, wish I could remember who suggested that, but it does fit with advice in my favourite freezer book.)

I’m with you on the cream cheese idea!!! It’s so expensive that I try only to pick it up on sale and freeze it to have on hand for my favourite cheesecake. I freeze countless other things, too, always checking my freezer book first for “freezability” and also for recommended storage time. I even freeze salad greens that are reaching the end of their time and throw them in fruit & veg smoothies. Leafy celery tops to put in the stock pot. You name it. Like I said, it must be the Scot in me! smile

Don’t know that name, Harold McGee. Will look him up—thanks for the pointer!

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
Back to top
 
‹‹ Poured Fondant      stacking 3 layer tiers ››