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Urgent help w/ moussline
Posted: 24 July 2009 05:13 PM   [ Ignore ]
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i mad e abatch and a half…..during the transfer of syrup to egg whites, some of it missed the bowl (about 1/8 cup maybe). now the mousseline is very soft, almost soupy. I am about to have a breakdown if i have to make this again. Any way to save it??

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Posted: 24 July 2009 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I assume you’ve already incorporated the butter then?  I can’t think of a way to fix the under-stabilized egg whites if that is the case.  I guess you could try chilling it and see what the texture is like.

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Posted: 24 July 2009 05:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Actually, maybe a bit of cream cheese would stabilize it—just a guess here—is that compatible flavor wise?

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Posted: 24 July 2009 05:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Oh Dear!!  Not sure what to say…to piggy back off of Matthew, maybe some white chocolate if the flavour warrants!

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Posted: 24 July 2009 05:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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A couple of T syrup not making it into the bowl shouldn’t create that much of a problem. Maybe your room temp is very warm right now? And/or the butter was too warm? Whatever… read Rose’s side note on p 245 TCB and follow what she says there. Chill bc until it’s between 65F and 70F or cool to the touch. Then beat until smooth.

If you still have the problem, white chocolate is a good suggestion. Cocoa butter might be even better, if you have some on hand. It’s a great stabilizer. Other stabilizers are all the gums (agar, guar, algin and pectin). Then there’s gelatin. But really, what you’re facing sounds more in need of some temperature control.

Added by edit: Just remembered! The sure-fire cure for a bc that’s going south because of thinning in hot conditions (and can’t be rescued by chilling) is a hard flake shortening. Most often, a small percentage of coconut fat. It must be made liquid before being incorporated into the icing.

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Posted: 24 July 2009 09:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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it is very humid here in NY today, but it seemed like a lost cause.i threw it away and started over. I’m not making cakes for a long time, i am stressed lol

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Posted: 24 July 2009 09:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Awwwwww, ski! Looks like both the baker and buttercream had a meltdown today. Never mind, you can tuck this lesson away for another day. You probably don’t realize yet how much you learned from the experience.

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Posted: 25 July 2009 03:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Oh dear ski…so sorry for you. Same thing happened to me just last month, there was something wrong with the butter and the mousseline never emulsified and firmed up, even after repeated chilling and beating. So… I made a fresh batch using a different brand of butter, which worked perfectly! Then, since I’m too much of a cheapskate to throw anything out, I mixed in the ‘soft’ batch with the new perfect buttercream - and it worked!! Of course now I had a double batch of mousseline….so I took out what I needed at the time, flavored it, and froze the rest unflavored. This way you can flavor it with whatever you want after it has thawed.

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Posted: 25 July 2009 02:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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There are many mousseline horror stories, enough to write another cake bible, so don’t feel alone.  I used to blame it on my mother as one thing she couldn’t be near to work!  But I tell you one thing, it remains the #1 buttercream in the world, so it is worth all the trial and error till you feel comfortable with it.

Temperature is CRUCIAL, both of the syrup, of the cooled meringue, and of the butter.  My $20 cdn quicktip thermometer is so handy, in fact I have 2 just in case.  There is NO way I could make mousseline without them!

Rose’s upcoming cake DVD has a short demo for mousseline!  Oh, btw, I have the bread DVD ready to be sent out, details posted on the blog.

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Posted: 25 July 2009 06:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Ski, don’t worry - you did the right thing. If it is soupy, it will never set up - just start again. But please keep baking!

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Posted: 25 July 2009 08:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Actually -  speaking in the hypothetical since the soupy batch is in the trash bin -

If you made another batch, you could have used firmer (cooler) butter so the mousseline is firmer than it would be typically.  Then you would add small amounts of the soupy mousseline to it and it would “even out” as it were. 

The temp of the syrup needs to be at least 235 at a minimum in order for this to work at all; I routinely make this multiple times a day and pull the syrup off the stove at 239 and it works perfectly, every time.  It works at 248 too so conditions in your kitchen will make your results variable.  On a warmer day, use cooler butter; in the winter, you might have your butter at room temp and get the same results.

if it happens again, don’t toss it; put it in the fridge and check it every 10 minutes.

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Posted: 25 July 2009 08:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Jeanne - that’s great to know.
and, to clarify, I didn’t mean that I thrown the failed batch in the trash! While I didn’t know you could actually resurrect it to a full bodied mousse, or the proper texture, I usually just put it in the fridge to use as a sauce.
Hector told us the trick!

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Posted: 21 August 2009 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Ski, if it makes you feel better, I was making the Raspberry Mousseline last year for my State Fair cake entry.  Well ... something was out of whack, temperature wise.  Probably because I got impatient and didn’t let the recipe components get to the right temperature.  Just as I was nearing the end of the emulsifcation process, everything broke down.  Completely.  Irretrievably.  Of course this was at 10pm or something.  Luckily I had allowed enough time for mishaps just like this and had another day to make the raspberry puree (which I have burned, again, being too impatient) and go thru the process again.

The good news?  I won the day!  So - keep trying.  Mousseline can be a bit scary to make but it’s worth it and you will get used to how it comes together.

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Posted: 21 August 2009 06:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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I was grateful yesterday that we’d had this discussion. Made a 2x batch of lemon mousseline for the wedding cake that’s in progress for tomorrow (luxury lemon discussed in another thread). When I added the liqueur, Limoncello, it would not incorporate. The bc was slopping around in the bowl, getting smoother and smoother.

The bakery was so hot! We keep the butter out, because it’s used all the time. I’d been careful to put my measured amount in the cooler for awhile. But this? Yikes. I still had the curd to incorporate, too. Remembering this thread, I kept my cool. Took the temp of the bc and sure enough, it was heading into the 80’s. Into the cooler, it went! Pulled the bowl back out only when the temp was between 65 and 70, just like Rose says in the side note. The liqueur mixed in fine, and so did the curd.

A big thanks to Jeanne, too, for her instructions (I think in another thread) about how to pour the syrup right into the bowl, skipping the intermediate step of using a measuring cup. It worked like a charm! smile

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Posted: 24 August 2009 11:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Jeanne - 25 July 2009 11:20 PM

If you made another batch, you could have used firmer (cooler) butter so the mousseline is firmer than it would be typically.  Then you would add small amounts of the soupy mousseline to it and it would “even out” as it were.

That’s exactly what I do. As was said too, make sure the butter isn’t too soft. We have that funky high dew point here in NJ so the butter will get super soft in no time, even in air conditioning.

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Posted: 25 August 2009 12:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Carolita - 21 August 2009 09:12 PM

I was grateful yesterday that we’d had this discussion. Made a 2x batch of lemon mousseline for the wedding cake that’s in progress for tomorrow (luxury lemon discussed in another thread). When I added the liqueur, Limoncello, it would not incorporate. The bc was slopping around in the bowl, getting smoother and smoother.

The bakery was so hot! We keep the butter out, because it’s used all the time. I’d been careful to put my measured amount in the cooler for awhile. But this? Yikes. I still had the curd to incorporate, too. Remembering this thread, I kept my cool. Took the temp of the bc and sure enough, it was heading into the 80’s. Into the cooler, it went! Pulled the bowl back out only when the temp was between 65 and 70, just like Rose says in the side note. The liqueur mixed in fine, and so did the curd.

A big thanks to Jeanne, too, for her instructions (I think in another thread) about how to pour the syrup right into the bowl, skipping the intermediate step of using a measuring cup. It worked like a charm! smile

Currently having the same issue when adding the Limoncello.  Hoping the cooler trick works.  I’d love to know why such a narrow temperature window affects the final product so much.  What are the signs of the comment on the side of TCB where the buttercream will begin to separate if you beat it too soon?  Is there a chance with the 10 minute intervals in the cooler, that I’d bring the mousseline too low, go to beat, then ruin the batch?  The batch couldn’t get much worse than what it was when I just tried to pipe it earlier and it came out as a yellow paste with yellow liquid…eww.


**EDIT: The mousseline seems okay now.  The runny soupy stuff I guess was just trying to use the mousseline too soon in too hot of a room with too hot of hands (i tried the two bag approach).  I checked on it every ten minutes and it seemed to set more but still slid around a bit in the mixing bowl.  I was able to get some of it to pipe (as I was running out of energy for the night) and the rest I put in an airtight container in the fridge.  I’m just worried that this only happens some of the time and because of that what adverse affects will the final product have.  I’d hate to see the frosting go all grainy and soupy after bringing the piped cupcakes up to RT.  1 batch of mousseline down, probably 7-8 more to go. (only have 5QT mixer so 2xs the recipe almost overflows the bowl.)

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