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Magi Cake Strips
Posted: 03 September 2009 11:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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I wonder if it would help if you soaked it in a solution of hot water and baking soda. Baking soda is excellent when it comes to absorbing odours.

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Posted: 04 September 2009 08:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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Good idea.  What brand of strips are we talking about here?  I have purchased several sets of magi-cake strips over the years, but recently I purchased Wilton strips.  The Wiltons definitely had a bit of an odor, but it baked away after a few uses.

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Posted: 04 September 2009 03:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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They are Wilton Strips and after several years of baking, the smell is still there.  Will try the baking soda idea.  I am getting annoyed with Wilton, they are taking over the cake world.  A local shop that used to carry Magic Line pans, now only carries Wilton.  Some Wilton products are excellent, and others, well…

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Posted: 04 September 2009 11:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
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Yep, they’re taking over the baking world…. not a bad thing if they put out great stuff, but most of what I see has been disappointing.

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Posted: 01 October 2009 10:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
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Carol,Rozanne, Patricia et al,
It’s been a while since I’ve been on the Forum. This is a bitter-sweet time for me as I embark on my first wedding cake experience for November 14. My father passed away on September 4th., so I have not been in the baking frame of mind. With that said, hopefully this cake will be good therapy.  I just wanted to let you know that I made a 12 inch layer yesterday with the cake strips and squeezed the water out, instead of sliding my fingers down the strip. This worked. I froze the layer on a cardboard round. Thus, my next question. Was it a mistake to use the cardboard round to freeze? When I defrost it will the round be wet or soggy to use on the actual wedding cake? As I go forward with other layers should I do something different? I’m a bit overwhelmed right now.  Need to get my heart back into this for my daughter’s sake. Claudia

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Posted: 01 October 2009 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 51 ]
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Oh Claudia - I’m so very sorry to hear that you lost your beloved father… so very, very sorry!

Nothing like taking on a big cake project to get your mind off of everything else.  I squeeze my strips too, not totally dry, but enough that they don’t drip.  I wouldn’t freeze cakes on a cardboard for exactly the reason you described.  If you need a flat surface, you can place the wrapped cake back into the baking pan, just until the cake freezes solid, then take it out of the pan.

Congratulations on your daughter’s upcoming wedding!

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Posted: 01 October 2009 10:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 52 ]
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Patricia, Thank you for your kind thought. Since I put it on cardboard and it’s frozen now, can I remove the cardboard and re-wrap the cake on nothing with the plastic wrap and foil? I decided to start baking some extra layers ahead of time. The wedding is still about 6 weeks away. Too soon to make and freeze?

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Posted: 01 October 2009 11:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 53 ]
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Claudia, my heart goes out to you. Deepest sympathy on the loss of your father. There really aren’t any words except to say that we’ll be with you as you move through the next few weeks coming up to your daughter’s wedding. Please rely on us to help in any way we can.

I’m glad Patrincia answered your question about the cardboard. I was going to advise that it wouldn’t be a problem, because I froze the layers for my sister’s wedding cake on cardboard a couple of years ago. But rethinking, I’m not sure. The cardboard was commercial grade, quite thick and heavily waxed—not the thin kind with silver foil on it. The cake layers were each on their own cardboard, frozen for two months. I would likely have thawed them in their wrappings, but it’s too long ago to say for sure.

More recently, have also frozen cake layers on Styrofoam cake rounds. They seem to release easily. But you’re safest to do as Patrincia suggested—freeze your wrapped cake layers in the baking pan or maybe on a cookie sheet, then tuck back in the freezer. I’ll pass on one bit of hard-won experience. If you use it, wait until the cakes are frozen solid to add a layer of aluminum foil. It’s too easy to put dents in the cake, especially with heavy duty foil.

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Posted: 01 October 2009 11:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 54 ]
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Thank you Carol…I just unwrapped the layers…now 2- 12 inchers…and took the cardboard off. I think they would have been fine, but I was afraid of any flavor releasing on them. I wrapped one in Plastic wrap, put a cake round in the bottom of the baking pan against the wrapped cake then I put a cake round on top of the pan and wrapped the whole think in foil. The second round I re-wrapped in plastic wrap then foil and placed on top of the frozen cake in the pan. I then put them both into a painters clear plastic bag and sucked the air out with a straw.  Are there plastic freezer bags big enough for 9 and 12 inch rounds? I thought the gallon zip locks would at least fit the 9 inch rounds, but no luck.

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Posted: 01 October 2009 11:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 55 ]
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Claudia, I think the painters bags you’ve used will be just fine. They’re not touching the cake itself, just acting as more insulation against the cold air. The layers are so well-wrapped that I’m sure they’ll be perfect! But yes, there are large bags big enough to contain full size sheet pans (24x16). I’m sure any local bakery would happily sell you a few, if you explain the situation. I don’t think they’re moisture- or vapour-proof, but they are food-safe and used widely for every possible purpose in bakeries. Mostly to cover products going on trolleys in walk-in freezers and coolers, but also to cover anything that has to sit out on the counter for awhile and you don’t want it to dry out.

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Posted: 01 October 2009 12:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 56 ]
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Hint to all - freeze cakes that are extremely well wrapped in food safe plastic first, then vacuum pack them in Space Bags for long term freezer storage - they have really LARGE sizes that accommodate large tiers. smile

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Posted: 01 October 2009 03:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 57 ]
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Claudia, I’m so sorry to hear about your father. It is indeed a bitter-sweet time for you. We are all here to help you out during this difficult time - baking or otherwise.

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Posted: 02 October 2009 09:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 58 ]
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thank you Rozanne, and all of you for that matter. I think I ‘m just overwhelmed right now with my organization of the project.  Help me out here, please. The wedding is on Saturday. I have all my Ganache and MBC frozen. When can I take those out of the freezer and into the refrigerator to be ready for the filling and frosting? I know they must be at room temperature. Rose says they last 8 months frozen and 1 week in the fridge. What about if they’ve been frozen…how long can they defrost in the fridge.  I’m sure I’ll read what I’ve written after I post this and think what a moron I am!  I guess I’m just looking for a time line for taking frozen elements out…including the cakes.  So sorry… I know I’ve asked or read this before in the forums…I just can’t find it.

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Posted: 02 October 2009 11:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 59 ]
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Claudia, I think the previous posts you were looking for were probably from Jeanne. I’ll put them at the end of my message so you can read them yourself, if needs be. The first includes her time-line for cakes covered in bc; the second post relates to fondant-covered cakes.

Here’s the basic info on her bc version, done on consecutive days if I understand correctly. She makes large batches of bc and has them on hand, so that’s not included in the time-line:
Day 1 - Bake cakes - refrigerate
Day 2 - Build individual tiers - refrigerate
Day 3 - Do crumb & final coats, final assembly of tiers and decoration

My time-line was slightly different for the last bc wedding cake due to circumstances at work. Days 1 and 2 can be done any time. Days 3 & 4 can be done on consecutive days. The wedding was later on a Saturday, so I did day 4 on the actual day. If your wedding is early on a Saturday, do Day 4 on Friday. That might be best in any case. As mother of the bride, you’ll be busy on the actual day of the wedding.

Day 1 - Bake, cool, wrap & freeze cakes
Day 2 - Prepare buttercreams and fillings (fridge or freezer if made far in advance)
Day 3 - Assemble individual tiers and do crumb coat
Day 4 - Final assembly of tiers, final bc coat and decoration

For more info on Jeanne’s production time-lines:
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/606/P15/#5069
http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/190/#1792

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Posted: 02 October 2009 11:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 60 ]
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oops! I’m the moron. I saw the word “timeline” and right away, started looking for Jeanne’s posts. You were asking when to take frozen elements out to thaw. Not the whole production timeline. Well, perhaps the info will be helpful anyway.

But to ansr your real question, I find that overnight in the fridge is fine for cakes. With the buttercream, depends how much is in the container. And there are two stages to consider: thawing in the fridge and bringing to room temp before rebeating. I do overnight for the thaw and to be on the safe side, about 4 hours to bring to room temp.

You can speed the latter up in different ways. The one I favour is measuring out approximately how much I need for each tier and spreading it thinly in large shallow containers of some kind. Have read somewhere, whether in forum or Rose’s books, a tip about applying heat in one way or another. The thought just makes me nervous because of the potential for taking it too far, and I’d have melted bc.

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