Spoiled Cream…
Posted: 13 September 2009 01:01 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I have some cream that is beginning to spoil.  Anyone know of a good use for it?  (an old family recipe or something?)

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Posted: 13 September 2009 01:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Can you make creme fraiche or something out of it?

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Posted: 13 September 2009 09:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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My understanding is that the olden days’ recipes calling for soured milk or cream worked because those products weren’t pasteurized. Rather than just souring slowly now, they spoil. So today’s recipes usually call for buttermilk. If your cream has barely begun to spoil, what about quiche? A deep-dish, robust one with lots of veg, spices and strong-flavoured cheese to mask the slight off taste. I sometimes do that when I have an excess of cream or milk and freeze individual pieces for thawing and eating as needed. Another favourite strategy is to make a chowder. If I’m pressed for time, and the cream or milk is close to its best-by date, I pop it in the freezer to slow down deterioration until I can get to it.

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Posted: 13 September 2009 11:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Carolita, milk can be frozen? I never knew that…this forum is great! I learn something new all the time.

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Posted: 13 September 2009 11:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Hmmm, perhaps start by boiling it for a few minutes to kill off bacteria.  Then use it in something that will be consumed today, or freeze it.  If you freeze it, fat cell membranes will get pierced by ice crystals, so you won’t be able to whip it very well, though you might be able to use it in something that is already emulsified, like quiche or a roux-based sauce or soup.

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Posted: 13 September 2009 03:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Yes Shimi, milk can be frozen. My source is lots of personal experience and booklets I’ve collected from various federal and provincial government food and agriculture agencies and NGOs. Here’s a direct quote from one:
“Milk is usually stored in a home freezer for two reasons: to preserve extra supplies on hand when the family is leaving on vacation, or to facilitate purchasing large supplies on infrequent trips to supermarkets. Normally it is considered too bulky to store in large quantities in a home freezer for an extended period of time.
“Nonhomogenized milk will exhibit fat separation, flavour deterioration, and settling-out of the the protein much more readily than homogenized milk. Raw milk will not keep satisfactorily in a home freezer.”

Freezing cream of all kinds, especially whipping cream, is more problematic because it suffers separation, flavour deterioration and may become difficult to whip. Certainly the same volume would never be achieved with the latter. But rather than waste perfectly good cream, I have frozen and used it in the types of savory applications Julie and I discussed above. I’ve also whipped it with a few drops of lemon juice to get a bit of volume, and served it as a sauce over cakes and puddings. But not for company, only for home consumption. wink

Frozen dairy products should be thawed in the fridge. If separation occurs, their smooth texture can sometimes be revived with a twirl in the blender. Of course, it’s wise to use them quickly, and the importance of proper wrapping/packaging with moisture-vapor-proof materials intended for freezing cannot be overemphasized. Waxed cartons used for many dairy products are not up to the task.

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Posted: 14 September 2009 01:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thank you for typing all that info out! It’s really helpful. I’ve only frozen buttermilk before; it’s hard to find here so I tend to grab a few cartons when I see them. Well, at least I’ve been freezing them properly. I usually decant the carton into 1/2 cup or 1 cup portions and freeze them in individual freezer bags. Takes up less room and I can just thaw what I need.

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Posted: 14 September 2009 02:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Interesting conversation.  I have a friend who buys milk and freezes it, but in our house, it doesn’t last long enough to have to worry about it spoiling - we go through more than a gallon a day!
My mother never froze heavy cream per se, but when I was a child she would freeze dollops of Chantilly Cream sprinkled with nonpareils - she’d serve them frozen - such a sweet treat that everyone loved.

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