will food coloring interfere with the taste of my homemade icing
Posted: 24 September 2009 10:31 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi I am making my daughter a homemade carebear cake for her 1rst birthday and I want the cake to be colorful including the icing, I was told that I can just add food coloring to it but my question is will the food coloring affect the taste of my icing.  I’m gonna make some homemade cool whip frosting because I don’t like my icing sugary. I also would like to know how much food coloring should I add for my recipe, here is the recipe

1 package instant vanilla pudding
1/4 cup powdered sugar
1 cup cold milk
8 ounces Cool Whip-Thawed

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Posted: 24 September 2009 11:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi.  Most of the baking and discussions that go on at this forum are about the recipes that are in Rose Levy Beranbaum’s books…and this is not at all the type of recipe she uses.  I can say that if you use Paste or gel food colorings from a craft store or cake decorating shop, they are very very concentrated and you need very little.  They also will not affect the flavor.  I don’t know much about the liquid color you get in the supermarket…but I don’t think they will have any effect on flavor that is noticable.  Typically, with the gel colors, one drop is enough to make a difference in the color…so I add one drop at a time until I get the color I want.

Goodluck.

Hope this was helpful.

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Posted: 24 September 2009 12:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Skylar, I’d like to suggest that you read the ingredient list on the Cool Whip container at your supermarket and the instant pudding package. You’ll see they’re full of sugar—mostly in the form of corn syrup and fructose—plus hydrogenated oil ( i.e. trans fats) and a long list of chemicals that are suspect in terms of health.

Next, check out the recipe for White Ganache on page 278 of the Cake Bible. It meets your preference for a whipped frosting with a vanilla taste that isn’t too sugary. To get the different colours you want, you could use chocolate melts instead of the plain white chocolate. Or if you prefer, you can use plain white chocolate and tint the ganache. Just don’t put liquid coloring agents directly into the chocolate or it will become lumpy. Bonus! The recipe couldn’t be easier. There are other possible recipes in TCB—for example, the super-stabilized whipped cream on page 256.

I promise! We won’t kick you out of the forum, if you use a recipe other than Rose’s. cheese But we probably won’t be able to restrain ourselves from encouraging you to consider the use of healthy, natural ingredients in your baking.

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Posted: 24 September 2009 02:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Skylar,
I agree with Carolita. Though I’m new to the forum and just started trying Rose’s recipes, am also more fond of natural healthier ingredients. Plus, they taste so much better! I think once you’ve tried Rose’s recipe (or other homemade icing/buttercream recipe) you wouldn’t want to go back to the store bought version ever again!

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Posted: 24 September 2009 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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You definitely want to use a gel or paste color; there’s enough stablizers and gelifiers in the pudding and cool whip to prevent it from watering out; you can find this kind of food coloring at a craft store like Michael’s.  Wilton is pretty much the only brand available at consumer retail stores.

Depending on when the birthday party is, you might want to experiment with the whipped cream recipes in the Cake Bible; what you’re describing is sort of like a pastry cream (the pudding and cold milk) lighted with whipped cream (the cool whip).  It also depends on how you’re doing the Care Bear - lying down? sitting up? and if you’re using this to pipe stars on the cake like a Wilton character pan or if you’re smoothing/swirling it on a stand up bear pan.

If the party is sooner, have a back up plan just in case.  I had someone call today for a Princess party theme Saturday AM pick up (not possible, we have 5 weddings this weekend plus various and other assorted celebration cakes) - I suggested that she get cupcakes for the kids and let them use the edible glitter you get at Michael’s to decorate them.  So maybe cupcakes would be a good back up plan if you have kids at your daughter’s party ....

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Posted: 25 September 2009 06:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Red food coloring, in particular, is known to give an off taste and Wilton does make a no-taste red food coloring.  Having said that, I know many kids are sensitive to food dyes and I really try to avoid using them, except as an accent.  I try and make “natural” colored icings by adding fruit purees, curds, etc. or by using chocolate.  Perhaps it is not as much “fun,” but I can guarantee you they taste way way better and I know it’s better for them too.

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Posted: 27 September 2009 02:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Sherry, do you just mix fruit puree right into icing? Does it not interfere with the texture? Do you strain the puree first? Sorry for the many questions, I also try to avoid food coloring in anything, and have been wondering how to avoid it if I want to make colored icing.

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Posted: 29 September 2009 02:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Hi Jenn,
I usually make Rose’s recipes so she has specifically indicated the proportions of puree to buttercream (keep in mind this is the real, rich stuff) and also has recipes for making the puree.  I do have some family with dairy allergies so I sometimes do cupcakes with shortening based icing and to be honest, I just experiment.  I’ve used raspberry puree (yes it is strained) and even jams.  I usually don’t do elaborate “Theme” decorations.  Just a swirl with the piping bag star tube.  I really am not a fan of the shortening based icings as they are so gritty and sweet, so as far as texture goes I don’t actually think I am ruining too much! Another great alternative is a fruit whipped cream…the colors aren’t strong, but they taste soo good.  Rose has a great strawberry recipe.  Of course, it doesn’t have a long shelf life, but it usually doesn’t stay around that long—but these are best used for topping a cake rather than a filling, unless a very light sponge based cake.  You could always take a small amount of your base recipe (say 1/2 cup and add 1 tsp. jam) and keep adding jam until you reach a point where a) it is awesome and works, or b) fails miserably at which point you haven’t ruined a whole batch.

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Posted: 29 September 2009 01:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Sherrie - this really helps! Thanks a lot. I generally don’t like shortening either, I could tell if store-bought dessert has is shortening-based (after taste like there’s a layer of film in the mouth).

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