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Fully baking tart shell
Posted: 23 October 2009 10:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Roxanne - 23 October 2009 12:30 PM
Julie - 23 October 2009 12:20 AM

I found these urn-sized coffee filters at a restaurant supply/party supply store in my tiny little town- the cashier thought I was loony to be so happy to find them!

:-D

I can get them at Sam’s Club and Costco by the case, but then I end up with 1,000 coffee filters taking up much needed storage space. Since I only use about 10 filters a year for tart shells, I just get them at a coffee shop. They usually don’t mind parting with a few of them.

I’m telling you guys - use them for cleaning windows, mirrors, even stainless appliances.  They won’t leave any streaks or lint debre.  This is an old trick I learned working at McDonald’s in high school.

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Posted: 23 October 2009 11:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Roxanne - 22 October 2009 06:30 PM

Starbucks UK menu lists 3 different filter coffees brewed every day, so I am sure they are using these filters, because they typically brew the coffee 2-3 gallons at a time and keep it in thermal urns. I don’t think it’s any different than what they do in the USA.

Hmmm maybe their espresso machines use filters - I am a huge fan of Starbucks and until I moved job I used to go to my local one several times a week, but they definitely don’t sell filter coffee, because I remember asking when they first opened and they said the nearest thing was Americano, which is espresso with added hot water.

I will ask however next time I’m in town, unfortunately I work in the middle of nowhere at the moment…

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Posted: 13 November 2009 11:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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I had a pecan pie in a restaurant that I have never forgotten.  The crust was like a chewy sugar cookie.  I am thinking of using Rose’s cookie tart crust for a pecan pie this holiday season.  Must the crust be pre-baked? I’m concerned that the crust will overcook with the filling in it.  Thank you.

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Posted: 14 November 2009 12:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I would recommend partially pre-baking it, at least. And cover up the edges with foil right away (even while prebaking) and all the way through regular baking. You’ll get a nice firm bottom crust this way.

I made a pumpkin-pecan pie last Thanksgiving with a partially prebaked crust. I didn’t cover the edges all the time and they got too brown. Other than that it was great!

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Posted: 15 November 2009 12:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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fondant - 14 November 2009 03:19 AM

I had a pecan pie in a restaurant that I have never forgotten.  The crust was like a chewy sugar cookie.  I am thinking of using Rose’s cookie tart crust for a pecan pie this holiday season.  Must the crust be pre-baked? I’m concerned that the crust will overcook with the filling in it.  Thank you.

If you don’t par-bake the crust before baking the pie, by the time the crust is baked all the way through, the filling will be toast, and if you bake the pie just until the filling is set, the crust will be raw. Custard based pies need to have their crusts par-baked before filling.

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Posted: 16 November 2009 06:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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asphodelia - 22 October 2009 05:01 PM

Thanks Jess, that’s easier to get hold of, for sure!

I’ve found a US website that lists various types of coffee filters, could you tell me which is the one I’d need (for a 10 inches) tart? Then once I know the dimensions and style, I’ll see if I can track some down.

http://www.cw-usa.com/supplies-filters.html

The caterers I share space with use frozen pie shells which they line with foil/beans to par-bake.  You could do something similar if you are having trouble finding the coffee filters with the flat bottom and pleated sides.  Shape the foil to the inside of the pan before you start (you might want to spray the underside of it very lightly with pan release before you put it in to bake) and keep it aside until you need it.

I also have the best results with a fully frozen shell, and the weights up against the sides.  I use pennies, to be honest with you!!

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Posted: 16 November 2009 09:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Rose has discussed this on the blog.  There are so many ways to blind bake a pie shell, but she prefers parchment, or better yet, coffee filters over foil, and she prefers rice over beans or weights.  She says:

? For blind baking (baking a pastry shell before it is filled), use a large-urn coffee filter to hold rice as the weight that keeps the crust from rising. The filter absorbs butter from the crust, and the rice, which toasts slightly, can be used for pilaf.

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Posted: 16 November 2009 04:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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That is pretty much my preference too.  I used parchment for many years, and probably still think it is best; however, the urn filters are so easy, it is hard not to like them, even though I find that they stick to the crust a little.

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Posted: 18 November 2009 03:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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A trick to keep the coffee filters from sticking - spray them with just a little bit of oil or baking spray. (I don’t have baking spray, but we do keep canola oil in a hand-pump Misto container and that works well.)

I like pennies for weights, too. Someday I must try the rice trick—lightly toasted rice that’s soaked up some of the butter from the crust—sounds delicious!

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