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Mousseline the nervewracking buttercream!
Posted: 29 January 2008 05:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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I found this link.
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/EggPasturization.htm
I don’t see how the hot sugar syrup could provide enough heat to pasteurize the egg whites in Mousseline. Especially when it is being drizzled into a cold mixing bowl. As the link suggests the risk is pretty low. I eat/cook mostly organic however and I have never seen organic pasteurized eggs. We buy naturally nested eggs from local farmers and I expect the conditions are decidedly unsanitary which is why this makes me so nervous. I would feel tremendous guilt if I made a special occasion cake and everybody got sick.

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Posted: 29 January 2008 05:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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I found this link.
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/EggPasturization.htm
So it looks like 160 is the right temp.
I don’t see how the hot sugar syrup could heat the egg whites to that temp though. Especially when they are being drizzled into a cold mixing bowl.

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Posted: 30 January 2008 02:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Thanks for posting that website, I just finished reading about all about eggs!!!  You all have to check it out it will def put us at ease for those of us who still opt for using eggs in BC and such.  Here is a bit of info I got regarding eggs pasteurizing, and BTW they mentioned you can pasteurize at 140 degrees but it needs to be held for 3.5 minutes (won’t forget that one again) and whites, yolk, whole eggs have dif temps of coagulation so that is pobably why it needs to be held at 140 for 3.5 minutes. 

“4. Doesn?t cooking destroy bacteria?

Even light cooking will begin to destroy any Salmonella that might be present, but proper cooking brings eggs and other foods to a temperature high enough to destroy them all. For eggs, the white will coagulate (set) between 144 and 149? F, the yolk between 149 and 158? F, and whole egg between 144 and 158? F. Egg products made of plain whole eggs are pasteurized (heated to destroy bacteria), but not cooked, by bringing them to 140? F and keeping them at that temperature for 3 1/2 minutes. If you bring a food to an internal temperature of 160? F, you will instantly kill almost any bacteria. By diluting eggs with a liquid or sugar (as in custard), you can bring an egg mixture to 160? F. Use these temperatures as rough guidelines when you prepare eggs.”

Check it out at
http://www.aeb.org/LearnMore/FightBac.htm#passingyolk

I pasteurize all my mousses this way and it is not complicated once you have had some practice.  It is an added job, but you know you’re safe.

What do you guys think of the site???

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Posted: 20 May 2012 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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If anyone has looked at the video Julius provided with Ann Bakes, she heats the egg white in her KA bowl over simmering water, whisking all the while by hand and then proceeds to add the sugar, and continues to whisk, and tests it by dipping her finger into the mixture and rubbing between 2 fingers to see if it is gritty, which means the sugar hasn’t melted. So if it hasn’t melted, then she continue to heat and whisk by hand which she says takss a few minutes, and then tests for grittyness again. If smooth, then she puts the bowl back onto the KA mixer and puts the PADDLE in and then adds the butter one piece at a time while beating, and when it comes together, she adds her lemon oil and beats it in the batter to flavor it; and then talks about use color paste to color the SBC.

So that being said, the whites of the eggs are cooked, so to speak. It has to, because sugar won’t melt unless it’s hot enough. So it’s like slowly tempering the egg whites before and after adding the sugar.

BTW, I know that when I make a Passover cake, without any leavening agent in it, but using only egg whites in it which must be beaten to fluffy & peaks before folding into the batter, if the egg whites sit in the bowl before incorporating it into the batter, there will always be liquid residue of the egg whites sitting at the bottom of the bowl unless you make the batter first and then whip the egg whites last then fold in.

I would think there would be some issue with doing the same thing with a mousseline or other such icing/frosting which calls for beaten raw eggs whites. I think the youtube video is an excellent way to go. Check it out.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBBoRMWcfNc 

I will be trying this method myself this week and let you know how it goes.

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