1 of 2
1
Old Mousseline, New Mousseline
Posted: 28 October 2009 05:03 AM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2008-02-28

So what does everyone think of the updated mousseline?

I’ve tried it once but I don’t think my tastebuds are refined enough to be able to detect the difference, although it has a smaller amount of butter.  Can’t remember if the sugar quantity varies.  Logic tells me this SHOULD result in a lighter texture - something that should appeal to those who are afraid of eating buttercream to begin with (not that it would make much difference because they are constantly scraping off the buttercream before even tasting it).  But I had made the strawberry version using Cordon Rose conserve so maybe the change in texture isn’t as evident in a fruit version.

Re. the updated technique of chilling the meringue and then beating it all into the butter:  well, I would either be chilling the butter after first beating it, in the original version; or the other way around in the new version.  So it’s all the same to me, although for some reason I feel less trepidation adding cold butter to the room temp meringue, than I do adding cool meringue to butter that’s just been beaten and might in fact be too soft.  I dunno.  In the original version the beaten butter has time to cool in the fridge while I make the italian meringue, so I save some time there.  While in the new version I have to wait for the meringue to chill before I start beating the butter.

Anyone want to weigh in on this?  Hector?  You’d be one of the most experienced with making both types!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2009 08:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4746
Joined  2008-04-16

I looked at the two recipes a few days ago, and the Italian Meringue is identical, but the new recipe uses less butter (perhaps because of Rose’s recommendation to use high fat butter for better emulsification).  So the new version will be a little more Italian meringue-like: sweeter and fluffier.  Also, the new method will be so much easier for all who are loathe to go through the curdling that often accompanies mousseline.

For my not-too-sweet tastebuds, I’ll probably stick with the original, which is already the sweetest of the three hot sugar syrup buttercreams in the Cake Bible.  I need to make cupcakes for Halloween, so I’ll be making up mousseline either today or tomorrow.

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Ultimate Cinnamon Rolls

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2009 11:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  535
Joined  2008-05-03

Does the ‘new’ mousseline not curdle when it’s coming together?  I’ve been too chicken to try it as it seems there is a leap of faith dumping all the butter into the italian meringue!  (I know, I do trust Rose - but I’m chicken!!!)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2009 11:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4746
Joined  2008-04-16

Good question, Annie.  Can anyone who’s made the new version answer that? 

I don’t remember Rose’s video showing much curdling, but that may not be the reality in my kitchen.  I was also thinking that it would be good to eliminate the L-O-N-G beating time that results if you try to manage curdling by beating until smooth after each spoonful of butter (which is what the Cake Bible suggests).

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Ultimate Cinnamon Rolls

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2009 05:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  880
Joined  2009-05-25

I’ve made the new BC and I actually had some problems—I could not get the meringue to cool down as quickly as Rose stated (thereby I am wondering, am I losing volume???)  Turns out, the mixture was too cool in the end (I have a really cool kitchen—so perhaps that was the culprit).  It eventually came together, but I still like the old technique and feel most comfortable with that.  I think I will use the same proportions of ingredients of the new, but just use the old technique (butter to meringue).

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2009 09:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  44
Joined  2009-05-14

I used the mousseline for the cake I made this week. I have never mademousseline before. I doubled the recipe that is on the Miette’s Tomboy cake.
I made 5 batches of it and it and each turned out perfect.  I was so scared it would flop I followed the direction to the letter!
It may be a case of beginner’s luck but I kept thinking to myself…‘this is pretty easy, why was I so worried?’ The raspberry batch I did was equally successful. So I think the new recipe is wonderful.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 October 2009 10:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2008-02-28

Great to know, Melinda!  When I finally ventured to make mousseline for the first time, I too found it was not actually difficult, but that it just has a number of steps that do have to be coordinated.  And leaves a real messy kitchen!

I’m actually finding it a bit more of a pain now with chilling the meringue etc.  I’m not sure why but yesterday I made 2/3 batch of the new mousseline from the Tropical wedding cake recipe and for some reason the meringue took a long long time to cool.  I used an ice bath to speed things up.  The reason is that I usually have a small window of time in which to bake (when the baby’s asleep), so I wanted to get the mousseline out of the way.  The meringue was a fair bit warmer than recommended when I put them together.  I had some curdling but it wasn’t soupy curdling.  It just looked extremely grainy.  From past experience I didn’t worry too much about it, it came together and didn’t take too long either. 

I have not added the passion curd to it yet, just the vanilla - and it does seem a touch more sweet.  I’ll see how it tastes again when the curd has been added.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 12:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1419
Joined  2007-11-15

Imo, it isn’t a big deal.  It is just easier to explain.  Could someone compare CB vs RHC and tell me what is the difference in grams for amount of butter?

When I made the tropical wedding cake, I used my 15.3 cup recipe which is scaled from CB.

When I made the burnt orange smbc from RHC pumpking cake, I didn’t notice any taste nor texture dispairs.  Haven’t checked the butter grams against RHC, I guess I just trust blindly whatever recipe is printed by Rose.

 Signature 

http://myyellowkitchen.com/index-equipment-html/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 02:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  266
Joined  2007-11-18

There are a few different versions of this buttercream out in the world, so if you want one that is slightly sweeter and fluffier than Rose’s original, but without the complicated steps of Rose’s updated version, just search around the internet and try a few of them. It’s traditionally called Italian meringue buttercream.

When I was apprenticing, the version I was required to make was pretty uncomplicated and was also a bit sweeter than Rose’s. It was also a bit lighter and easier to spread.

I don’t bother pre-beating the butter. I’m not sure what the point of that is. I didn’t learn it that way as an apprentice. I basically whipped egg whites with sugar until moderately stiff, then beat in the syrup. When it was cool, I just started adding bits of butter at room temperature until the whole thing came together. Never failed for me.

 Signature 

Visit my blog: The Mile High Baker at http://www.milehighbaker.blogspot.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 07:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4746
Joined  2008-04-16
hectorwong - 29 October 2009 03:21 AM

When I made the burnt orange smbc from RHC pumpking cake, I didn’t notice any taste nor texture dispairs.  Haven’t checked the butter grams against RHC, I guess I just trust blindly whatever recipe is printed by Rose.

I checked before making it, and the silk meringue is exactly the same as the Cake Bible version, no changes.  Sadly, this was the buttercream that I dropped and the glass broke (burnt orange).

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Ultimate Cinnamon Rolls

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 08:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4746
Joined  2008-04-16
Roxanne - 29 October 2009 05:42 AM

I don’t bother pre-beating the butter. I’m not sure what the point of that is.

I did a side-by-side comparison of unflavored mousseline, same brands of sugar, butter, eggs, etc., but with one batch using butter that was creamed until very pale and fluffy, the other used butter straight from the stick.  The batch with the creamed butter was noticeably paler (whiter)- helpful if trying to achieve a whiter BC for wedding, etc.  Since the color is due to air bubbles, I would imagine that the creamed butter makes a higher volume (yield) of BC, and a slightly fluffier one.

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Ultimate Cinnamon Rolls

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 01:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2008-02-28

My bad for not doing this before starting this thread.  But I’ve just checked the recipes, and found (using amount of egg whites as the base - which I’m not even sure is the correct way to compare):
- the mousseline from RHC’s Tropical wedding cake is exactly the same in terms of ingredients as the version in TCB
- the mousseline in Miette’s Tomboy (pg 147) has less butter, but the same amount of whites and sugar
- the version from the Strawberry Cake (pg 93) has MORE butter and sugar for the same amount of whites, and I’m assuming this may be to allow it to accommodate more tart strawberry butter (slightly more than 1 cup, compared with the 3/4 cup in TCB)

Anyway not to over-complicate things, as Hector says.  Not a big deal.  Just curious now.  Well now I know I can’t simply interchange the recipes - which I did earlier tonight.  I had added the proportions from 2 different mousseline recipes in RHC to make a larger batch instead of scaling from one of them - I know, it’s one of those DUH, Why Did I Do That??  things, but I had the idea I was going to apportion out some of it to make Miette’s Tomboy later this week, and the other part was added to the batch I had made last night for my son’s birthday cake.  I was afraid the partial batch I had made from the Tropical wedding cake recipe yesterday wasn’t going to be enough.  Now it’s all sitting in the fridge, 2 different recipes dumped into one container.

Whatever.  Not going to stress too much about it unless something happens when I add the passion curd tomorrow!!

I just have to say, though, that using vanilla cognac makes it taste absolutely stupendiferous.  I never was too keen on the straight vanilla mousseline but whew this was stunning.  My son was licking the beaters and bowl clean, cognac notwithstanding.

On pre-beating the butter.  I used not to do so.  Now I do.  I find it makes the texture so much airier and lighter.  I skipped chilling the meringue tonight though.  Didn’t seem to be a problem.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 01:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  156
Joined  2008-02-28

Oh, and here’s the comparison using 150g egg whites as the base:

The Miette’s Tomboy mousseline has the same amount of sugar as the TCB version but 370g butter instead (about 20% less)

The Strawberry Cake (pg 93) mousseline uses 220g of sugar (200g for TCB) and 474g butter (454g for TCB), 1.1 cups tart strawberry butter compared with TCB’s 3/4 cup.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 01:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  865
Joined  2008-03-09

I did a quick comparison of all the new mousselines in RHC with the classic mousseline from TCB shortly after I got my new book. What impressed me most was Rose’s genius in finding a way to make the new high-fat butters work in her version of Italian meringue bc. Made her classic recipe with high-fat butter in August at the bakery where I was working - they use it for everything - and it was a disaster. Whereas I’d never had a problem before and haven’t since with TCB version made with regular butter at 80% fat content.

Shimi and maybe others, too, have made Rose’s classic mousseline with high fat butter and not had problems. Hers was a different brand and cultured - my bakery’s high fat brand was creamery. Who knows? In any case, we now have mousseline recipes especially formulated for high fat butter and that seems, to me, a wonderful contribution to the baking world!

As others have noted, there are changes in the method, too. It would be wonderful to hear from Rose about her journey of discovery in creating the new mousseline. Perhaps she’ll post about it one day on the blog.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 04:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  592
Joined  2007-11-27

A few years ago, my distributor gave me Plugra instead of my usual butter (it was a huge windfall, I usually order 5 cases at a time).  I was a little anxious about how it would perform in the buttercream but it was beautiful and I wish they would make that mistake more often (they charged me the same rate as for the usual butter!).  So I know from experience that high fat butter works ok in the regular mousseline buttercream I’m making.  I’m waiting til the off-season to bake my way through the new book.  Everyone will be on a diet in January so I’ll be in trouble trying to get everyone else to eat what I’m making!!

 Signature 

I Dream of Jeanne Cakes selected by Brides Magazine as one of their 100 Favorite Bakers (2013)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 October 2009 04:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  535
Joined  2008-05-03

Oh, Julie, I’m SO sorry about your spilt buttercream.  I think that dropping the bowl is even worse than it not working out.  Were you able to rescue ANY of it?  Had you already made the cake?  I feel your pain!

Carol, all butter here in the UK is high butterfat.  I’ve never had a problem with mousseline using it.  Maybe there was something up with the creamery butter?

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
Back to top