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3 teir cake with blue roses
Posted: 06 January 2010 05:42 PM   [ Ignore ]
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This is a cake we did just as a practice cake. it didnt get eatin or sold.

Top teir was red velvet
Bottom tear was Chocolate

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Posted: 06 January 2010 09:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Blue roses don’t exist in nature. That’s probably part of the reason for the reaction you’re getting from your customers.

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Posted: 06 January 2010 11:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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looks fine to me since I cannot do roses in any color…. nor fondant - yet

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Posted: 13 January 2010 09:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Carolita - 07 January 2010 01:12 AM

Blue roses don’t exist in nature. That’s probably part of the reason for the reaction you’re getting from your customers.

i beg to differ actually….

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Posted: 13 January 2010 09:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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and i actually need to change that, im sure yall have noticed it is a 2teir not a 3teir.. lol

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Posted: 13 January 2010 10:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’m no expert, cakegirl, but always understood that blue flowers represent the mysterious and unattainable because they only exist in fantasy.

Before replying, I double-checked my thinking with a quick search of the Internet and found this website, along with others, indicating that the blue roses we see at the florist are either sprayed or the result of genetic modification: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_rose

No intention to be disrespectful towards your work. You seemed to be wondering why the cake didn’t get eaten or sold. I was just hazarding a guess. Who really knows why people are attracted to one cake design and not another?

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Posted: 13 January 2010 03:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I have grown blue roses - they were fairly rare here.  Their colour was not a bright blue - far more subdued and tending towards a dusky purple shade.

I agree blue roses on a cake look odd!

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Posted: 13 January 2010 08:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I think your cake is beautiful. I love blue roses.
<——

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Posted: 13 January 2010 11:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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It’s a pretty big cake and at this time of year, I find most customers are trying to pretend they are still with their New Year’s resolution to eat healthier things, be on a diet, etc.  My dessert sales plummet this month and many places take vacations now because they’ve been going full tilt since the beginning of November.

The other thing I noticed is bubbles? or maybe it’s the way the light hits it, but the bottom tier looks smooth and perfect, while the top tier doesn’t look quite as smooth.  And sometimes you never know with flowers; if you did an arrangement of pastels (so it looked like a garden), maybe the cake would have sold. 

Hopefully it wasn’t a total loss (speaking in terms of $) and that you were/are able to sample it to customers so they get to taste your red velvet and chocolate cake!  That’ll bring them back to place a custom order when they finally fall off their diets wink

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Posted: 14 January 2010 04:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Carolita - 13 January 2010 02:26 PM

I’m no expert, cakegirl, but always understood that blue flowers represent the mysterious and unattainable because they only exist in fantasy.

Before replying, I double-checked my thinking with a quick search of the Internet and found this website, along with others, indicating that the blue roses we see at the florist are either sprayed or the result of genetic modification: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_rose

No intention to be disrespectful towards your work. You seemed to be wondering why the cake didn’t get eaten or sold. I was just hazarding a guess. Who really knows why people are attracted to one cake design and not another?

well, not to be disrepectful either, but i did say this was a practice cake, i guess i should have said this cake was not for sale… we did it as a test cake,..........
i also did a search, and they do actually exsist with out having to spray paint them!

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Posted: 14 January 2010 05:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Jeanne - 14 January 2010 03:55 AM

It’s a pretty big cake and at this time of year, I find most customers are trying to pretend they are still with their New Year’s resolution to eat healthier things, be on a diet, etc.  My dessert sales plummet this month and many places take vacations now because they’ve been going full tilt since the beginning of November.

The other thing I noticed is bubbles? or maybe it’s the way the light hits it, but the bottom tier looks smooth and perfect, while the top tier doesn’t look quite as smooth.  And sometimes you never know with flowers; if you did an arrangement of pastels (so it looked like a garden), maybe the cake would have sold. 

Hopefully it wasn’t a total loss (speaking in terms of $) and that you were/are able to sample it to customers so they get to taste your red velvet and chocolate cake!  That’ll bring them back to place a custom order when they finally fall off their diets wink

Actually it is quilted on top….
and like i said b4, it was just a practice cake,, there was no intend to sell it or eat it..
i did this cake to show the different features of fondant… the quilting side, or the smooth side…
also, not eveyone looks for a origianl traditional cake… some people are into the fantasy part of it
Have you only done traditional cakes? or do people want it their own ways?? do people ask for it to be a
special part of them? such as if they wish for blue flowers you give them blue flowers…. you dont deny them
of their wishes am i correct? would you tell a customer im sorry i dont belive in blue flowers on a cake?? i highly dought
that!!
Thanks for yall’s responses, they do keep me open minded for the future

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Posted: 14 January 2010 05:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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ohwhataday03 - 14 January 2010 12:13 AM

I think your cake is beautiful. I love blue roses.
<——

Thanks !!!! smile

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Posted: 14 January 2010 06:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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cakegirl134 - 14 January 2010 08:53 PM
Carolita - 13 January 2010 02:26 PM

I’m no expert, cakegirl, but always understood that blue flowers represent the mysterious and unattainable because they only exist in fantasy.

Before replying, I double-checked my thinking with a quick search of the Internet and found this website, along with others, indicating that the blue roses we see at the florist are either sprayed or the result of genetic modification: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_rose

No intention to be disrespectful towards your work. You seemed to be wondering why the cake didn’t get eaten or sold. I was just hazarding a guess. Who really knows why people are attracted to one cake design and not another?

well, not to be disrepectful either, but i did say this was a practice cake, i guess i should have said this cake was not for sale… we did it as a test cake,..........
i also did a search, and they do actually exsist with out having to spray paint them!

Blue roses are beautiful and mysterious. However, Carol is right. They are not natural in the sense that roses don’t have a gene for the color blue. Any blue rose we have now do grow naturally but they have been genetically engineered to have the color blue.

I think the roses on your cake are very realistic. In my opinion I don’t like too many flowers on the cake because they kind of overwhelm everything. If you want to do a blue rose cake maybe only using a few would enhance the mystery and beauty of that elusive rose.

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Posted: 14 January 2010 07:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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[quote author=“cakegirl134” date=“1263520931
Actually it is quilted on top….
and like i said b4, it was just a practice cake,, there was no intend to sell it or eat it..
i did this cake to show the different features of fondant… the quilting side, or the smooth side…
also, not eveyone looks for a origianl traditional cake… some people are into the fantasy part of it
Have you only done traditional cakes? or do people want it their own ways?? do people ask for it to be a
special part of them? such as if they wish for blue flowers you give them blue flowers…. you dont deny them
of their wishes am i correct? would you tell a customer im sorry i dont belive in blue flowers on a cake?? i highly dought
that!!
Thanks for yall’s responses, they do keep me open minded for the future

I misunderstood your original post, when you said it didn’t get eaten or sold; I thought you were creating the cake for a shop and wondering why it didn’t get sold!

The quilting wasn’t obvious in the photo, to my eyes.  Thank you for pointing it out.

In the years I’ve been in business, I think it’s hard to define what a traditional cake looks like.  Twenty years ago (in this country), most people thought a wedding cake was white, maybe pillars, swags, buttercream flowers.  Then The Cake Bible was published, Martha Stewart’s Wedding book was out and bakers began to challenge the notion of “traditional” as far as wedding cakes go (please note, I’m speaking of a US customer base - rolled fondant has long been used in the UK and Australia). 

When clients come to me, they usually have some ideas about what they want. There’s so much more out there now than in previous years - with the Food Network, books, magazines and web sites.  Twenty years ago, brides went to their local bakery and looked through their pictures and picked what they wanted.  They didn’t have the resources available now.  Now when clients come to see me, they have pictures from magazines, the web - you name it.  As a designer, I can look at all the photos they show me and see what the common themes are and then begin to work up a custom design. I sketch things out, and it is a collaborative effort. 

If I understand your question correctly - about do I tell a customer if something they are asking for won’t work - yes, I will give them the benefit of my experience.  If I think something won’t work (aesthetically), I will find a gracious way to bring that up - usually by asking where the cake will be displayed, what’s on the walls behind it - some way to bring it up without denigrating the client because that’s not right.  During our conversation, the client will begin to picture the cake in that spot and sometimes come to the same conclusion.  Sometimes not.  I had a client who wanted a design that I originally did in white fondant; she wanted chocolate.  I said that some of the detail would be lost by having dark chocolate on dark chocolate; she decided that’s what she wanted anyway. She later told me that she realized what I’d been saying after seeing the pictures; but she was happy with the cake, and that’s what really matters.  Another client wanted completely different designs (and I mean wildly different, and not in a good way either) on each of the cake tiers.  We spent a long time on the design phase and I even made a mock up so she could see it.  I didn’t care for it personally, but she loved it.  The only thing she wanted that I couldn’t do was to put inedible sequins on the cake.

If you are happy with your creation, that’s all that counts.

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Posted: 17 January 2010 03:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Jeanne,
thank you for all that…. its definitly insiteful…. and i do understand where you are comming from when you say
” yes, I will give them the benefit of my experience.  If I think something won?t work (aesthetically), I will find a gracious way to bring that up - usually by asking where the cake will be displayed, what?s on the walls behind it - some way to bring it up without denigrating the client because that?s not right.  During our conversation, the client will begin to picture the cake in that spot and sometimes come to the same conclusion”
was not quite how i intended the question, but it did help me rethink things.. i do find ur work to be amazing.. I really appreciate the constructive critisim from you and anyone who offers it for that matter.. i will take it all in and learn from it.. i have not been at this as long as most of you i am sure of that, i would love to learn more from anyone who is willing to offer their knowlege,
if anyone has any tips that would help me in any way please let them out. lol.!!!
Thanks again!!!!

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