Cheesecake pan removal
Posted: 09 January 2010 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi everyone,

I’ve been baking for a long time, but I wanted to see if there were any new ideas for cheesecake pan removal. (I apologize if this was covered elsewhere…I didn’t see it.) My auction item for my childrens’ school was a cheesecake each month for the highest bidder. The only issue I have is getting the cake off the pan. I’m lining the pan with parchment and typically freezing until I can pull the cake off the pan, but it seems like there should be a better way. I also worry about the effect of freezing the cakes. I don’t want to lose that perfect texture.

Most of the cheesecakes have a crust, but some do not.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

Liz

Oops. I see that I posted in the wrong place. I’ll repost.

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Posted: 09 January 2010 05:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi,

My first thought on removing the cake from the pan would be to make the crust thicker.  I find that when I do that, I have an easier time removing the cake from the pan. Alternately, you could bake it in a disposable pan and not remove it at all. I hope this helps.

Jan

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Posted: 09 January 2010 07:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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What kind of pan are you using?  I use loose bottom pans, and have never had a problem.

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Posted: 09 January 2010 08:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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...or are you having trouble getting it off of the bottom disk?

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Posted: 10 January 2010 01:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I recall somewhere (likely TCB) that Rose recommends chilling the cake thoroughly, placing plastic wrap (can’t remember if it is spray oiled or not) directly on top of the cake, and inverting onto a plate (preferably something that can rest inside the cheesecake pan).  Then take a towel dipped in hot water and place against the pan bottom and eventually it will loosen.  I did this with the Pumpkin Cheesecake from RHC and it turned out fine.  I had to slide the pan bottom off.  Then reinvert and remove the plastic wrap.

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Posted: 10 January 2010 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’m not having trouble removing the pan, I just want to get the cheesecake off the bottom to give it to someone without giving her part of my pan. I have been able to do this by freezing, and by inverting some cakes, but I worry about messing up the texture of the cheesecake- or about ruining the top of the cake by inverting.

I have inverted some (without freezing), but I don’t want to wreck the smooth top, either. Will that work for most cakes? If you oil the plastic wrap, is there any residue or effect on the cake?

I’m probably being too perfectionistic here, but I want every cake to be beautiful, delicious, and have a great texture…

Is there any kind of disposable bottom that could go into the pan before baking (I’m thinking of a cheesecake with a crust), that would allow you to slide the cheesecake right off the bottom of the pan, or am I living in some kind of baking dream world.

I should clarify that I am getting all of the cheesecakes off the pan effectively, I was just hoping to skip the freezing step to maintain texture. [And since I’ve had children, I pretty much have no clue what else has been happening in the rest of the baking world, so I thought it was worth a query. smile  ]

Thanks everyone!

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Posted: 10 January 2010 11:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Not exactly a new idea, but one that I find delightful and have never seen anyone else use. I first learned of this idea from Rose in The Cake Bible - a thin round of biscuit as the base and even the sides, if you wish. Not biscuit as in *baking powder biscuits* but the French word (bis-kwee), the thin sponge which is baked in a 1” high sheet pan and most often used to create rolled cakes with filling.

Might not work for every style of cheesecake you make, but there are many different flavours possible to mix and match with your cheesecake fillings. There’s the usual almond-flavoured, often called jaconde. Rose has a recipe for that as a variation of a plain vanilla biscuit in TCB. Other variations, too, and you could come up with more yourself. She used the almond one as a base for her Golden Glory Cheesecake, and I’ve used it as a base and layers for opera-style cakes. Have used the ginger variation as a base for one of her lighter butter cakes (the Golden Luxury), when that was the best way to work the bride’s desire for “ginger somewhere” into the flavour profile of her lemon wedding cake. It was delicious! And so unique.

Check out Rose’s note on p 142 TCB, where she talks about this (cutting it with scissors, etc.). As she says, a sheet of biscuit has many possibilities. I like to have some on hand in the freezer at all times. Have even cut cake decorations from it - small stars that looked so nice on top of a ganache-covered birthday cake. And bonus! you can use it to line the parchment-lined bottom of your pan before pouring in the batter, where it will help enormously with the release when it comes time to remove the cake from the pan. (Or you can bake the cake as normal and unmold on to a round of biscuit sitting on a cardboard cake round.) Another bonus is that the biscuit base nicely absorbs any excess moisture.

Also check out Rose’s notes p 82 for tips on unmolding cheesecake. Are you using parchment? That would help. Also the usual running a thin spatula around the sides, placing the pan on a heated burner for 10 to 20 seconds, moving back and forth, and then invert. Reinvert, if desired.

Last but not least, check out her unmolding tips and all the ways in which Rose has handled the base, its release, etc. in her newest book, Rose’s Heavenly Cakes. Cheesecakes pp 242 - 260.

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Posted: 10 January 2010 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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How about making a round with heavy duty foil and placing it on the pan secured with shortening or baking spray, before adding the batter.  Maybe a cardboard round?

Also, a non stick tart pan bottom is great to slide it under and do the transfer.

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Posted: 10 January 2010 08:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Liz - 10 January 2010 12:49 PM

I’m not having trouble removing the pan, I just want to get the cheesecake off the bottom to give it to someone without giving her part of my pan. I have been able to do this by freezing, and by inverting some cakes, but I worry about messing up the texture of the cheesecake- or about ruining the top of the cake by inverting.

I have inverted some (without freezing), but I don’t want to wreck the smooth top, either. Will that work for most cakes? If you oil the plastic wrap, is there any residue or effect on the cake?

I’m probably being too perfectionistic here, but I want every cake to be beautiful, delicious, and have a great texture…

Is there any kind of disposable bottom that could go into the pan before baking (I’m thinking of a cheesecake with a crust), that would allow you to slide the cheesecake right off the bottom of the pan, or am I living in some kind of baking dream world.

I should clarify that I am getting all of the cheesecakes off the pan effectively, I was just hoping to skip the freezing step to maintain texture. [And since I’ve had children, I pretty much have no clue what else has been happening in the rest of the baking world, so I thought it was worth a query. smile  ]

Thanks everyone!

If you use a tasteless oil, you won’t have a problem.  You could theoretically use a pan spray as well but I’ve never tried that.

At the bakery, we use removeable bottom pans and I have several of the wide “spatulas” from the King Arthur catalog (they have a red handle, and I think they’re manufactured in Germany).  It’s about 10” wide and 10” long.  It works beautifully.  The only kind of crust I have any trouble with on occasion is an oreo cookie crumb crust - it likes to stick.

You also might consider using a topping - sometimes they can really make a plain cheesecake look festive; and it takes care of any issues that might come up if you have trouble flipping it for those times where you aren’t using a removeable bottom pan.

What a fun gift - for you (getting to make all those cheesecakes) and for the recipient!  Have fun!

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