Bubbles in Mousseline?
Posted: 20 January 2010 11:14 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Spreading it left behind lots of pits in the surface of the frosting.  Bubbles, you think?  How can I fix this?

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Posted: 21 January 2010 09:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi CharlesT,

Sometimes I have the same problem.  I usually dip my off set spatula, or whatever you are using to ice the cake in very hot water, then I wipe it dry and smooth it around the cake.  The heat from the spatula kind of melts just the top layer of the icing and it is enough to get rid of the bubbles and you are left with a very smooth surface.  Just make sure that you wipe your spatula dry first.  You don’t want any water to mix in with the buttercream.  Hopefully this helps you.

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Posted: 21 January 2010 11:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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The bubbles are normal in a whipped buttercream.  I have found that the texture is sometimes a little less “bubbly” if you make the bc ahead (at least a day), and rebeat with a hand whisk before using. 

I like Liza’s suggestion.  I have also found that a flatter spatula angle (perhaps 20 degrees) works better for smoothing than a more perpendicular angle (90 degrees).  If the buttercream is particularly soft, a brief chill in the refrigerator can help firm it enough to facilitate smoothing.

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Posted: 21 January 2010 12:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Liza - 21 January 2010 01:39 PM

I usually dip my off set spatula, or whatever you are using to ice the cake in very hot water, then I wipe it dry and smooth it around the cake.

Hi Liza, thank you.  While I was in the middle of my problem, I vaguely remembered about hot spatulas to create ultrasmooth surfaces, but didn’t know it would solve a bubbles problem.

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If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

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Posted: 21 January 2010 01:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Julie - 21 January 2010 03:47 PM

I have also found that a flatter spatula angle (perhaps 20 degrees) works better for smoothing than a more perpendicular angle (90 degrees).

Ah, that explains why my final solution worked:  I used one of those Wilton flat triangle shaped profiling tools to put rows of equally space rows around the edge.  I had to hold it flat to avoid removing too much icing.  If anything, the frosting was too thick; maybe because I added the Bill quantity of chocolate, but didn’t reduce the egg whites.

As a side note, I’ve determined that Chocolate buttercreams are very unsatisfying, at least ones where the eggs get whipped.  Way too light.  Flo Braker has an interesting version she calls “Sabayon Buttercream” that I may try next.

Thank you!

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If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

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Posted: 21 January 2010 02:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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CharlesT - 21 January 2010 05:28 PM
Julie - 21 January 2010 03:47 PM

I have also found that a flatter spatula angle (perhaps 20 degrees) works better for smoothing than a more perpendicular angle (90 degrees).

Ah, that explains why my final solution worked:  I used one of those Wilton flat triangle shaped profiling tools to put rows of equally space rows around the edge.  I had to hold it flat to avoid removing too much icing.  If anything, the frosting was too thick; maybe because I added the Bill quantity of chocolate, but didn’t reduce the egg whites.

As a side note, I’ve determined that Chocolate buttercreams are very unsatisfying, at least ones where the eggs get whipped.  Way too light.  Flo Braker has an interesting version she calls “Sabayon Buttercream” that I may try next.

Thank you!

this is an aside also, the sabayon buttercream is practically rose’s silk meringue butter cream without the meringue. I love the chocolate version of the SMBC so I can imagine the sabayon buttercream would be yummy—as well as more creamy and dense than the SMBC.

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Posted: 22 January 2010 01:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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belasuna - 21 January 2010 06:37 PM

the sabayon buttercream is practically rose?s silk meringue butter cream without the meringue. I love the chocolate version of the SMBC so I can imagine the sabayon buttercream would be yummy?as well as more creamy and dense than the SMBC.

Thanks for that insight.  It’s great to see how one recipe is connected to another, because it helps develop the ability to mix and match things you like to create something new.

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If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

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