Clarified butter and Genoise problem
Posted: 23 January 2010 11:26 PM   [ Ignore ]
Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  65
Joined  2009-11-25

Hello, everybody. Greetings from Rio.
This time I tried to make Rose’s Genoise Classique.
I have a question, please: how do I know the butter is clarified: is it when it starts to become browny? Is there a precise temperature?

I am a little disappointed with my cake because it was only 1 inch high.
I also think it was extremely dry (without the syrup)... Is it always supposed to be syruped?
Can overbaking be the reason for that excessive dryness?

Thank you and have an excelent Sunday!
Felix

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 January 2010 12:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1077
Joined  2007-11-15

Hi Felix,

Yes, in general, you do need to syrup genoise or it will be dry. I think Rose has a video making this you could watch, and also a posting about genoise height on the main blog. You may not have beaten the eggs long enough or over-folded the batter.

If you brown the butter when clarifying it, it is called beurre noisette, and more delicious in my opinion, but you don’t need to take it that far for clarifying. Just until the white solids fall to the bottom, and the butter is clear under the foam.

And, yes, overbaking can cause dry cakes, but in this case, it was probably the lack of syrup.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 January 2010 12:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1376
Joined  2008-09-27
Felix - 24 January 2010 03:26 AM

I am a little disappointed with my cake because it was only 1 inch high.

As Matthew said, you may have collapsed the foam by not folding efficiently.  I’ve done that *a lot*.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 January 2010 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4839
Joined  2008-04-16

Yes to everything Matthew and Charles said.  Genoise has to be syruped or it will be dry, and a little lacking in flavor (though Rose’s are more flavorful than most).

For Genoise, definitely take the butter solids to a rusty-brown color, buerre noisette.

It should be taller than 1”.  There are several things that can affect the height:
-If your mixer is less powerful than a Kitchen Aid (like a hand mixer), you will need to beat the eggs on high for at least ten minutes (at least five minutes for a Kitchen Aid or similar).
-The full amount of beaten eggs specified in the recipe (for a four-egg genoise, this is a scant cup) needs to be folded into the browned butter or it will be too heavy.
-The cake flour/cornstarch (or Wondra) must be sifted over the eggs in two batches.
-Use a balloon whisk or slotted spoon for folding.
-Don’t fold more than necessary.

Overbaking- if you watch the genoise towards the end of baking, the center will peak and then very slightly shrink/flatten.  It will also shrink a little from the sides, unless you are using cake strips.  As soon as that little bit of shrinking happens, it is done.

Good luck!

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  Peanut Butter Cups, All Grown Up

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 January 2010 03:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  65
Joined  2009-11-25

Thank you, Matthew, Charles and Julie.
I have syruped the genoise and the taste was nice (plain syrup with 2 spoons of Monin Blueberry).
But in terms of appearance and height, it was really disaponting to check out the video by Rose wich you have mentioned. Hers is so high and fluffy, and I see she DOES NOT syrups the genoise in the video (instead she serves it with fruit puree).
But I will try again and follow the directions you have given to me.
Thank you all!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 January 2010 04:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1077
Joined  2007-11-15

I just saw that too, but I have never eaten genoise without syrup as it does get quite dry.  I assume she must mean you can go without syrup if you eat it directly after baking, or within a few hours. Still, I can’t imagine it could be as nice and moist as a syruped genoise.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 January 2010 06:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4839
Joined  2008-04-16

I agree with Mathew, and I assume Rose does too, at least to a certain extent, because she does not feature an unsyruped genoise in any of her books.

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  Peanut Butter Cups, All Grown Up

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top