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Decorating on IMBC
Posted: 24 February 2010 08:40 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I have two birthday cakes to finish tomorrow and frosting with IMBC. I am planning on using gumpaste flowers on one and modeling chocolate roses on the other if this is okay to do. This is the first time I have made gumpaste and modeling chocolate flowers and it was fun to do. How far ahead can I place the flowers - delivery is Friday- and can I refrigerate the cakes afterwards or I can always put them in the trunk of the car. (It’s Michigan, cold and about 25* tomorrow!)
Do I need to put anything inbetween the flowers and the cake and I will put the wires in straws to go in to the cakes.

Thank you for your help

Colleen

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Posted: 24 February 2010 02:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Gum paste flowers might soften if they are refridgerated.  You can refridgerate your cakes covered with IMBC and put the gumpaste flowers on at the last minute. If your flowers are completely dry they should be okay ontop of the IMBC.  I am making a couple of rose sprays for a cake in March and I don’t want them to touch the IMBC because the recipient will be taking them home.  Someone from Cake Central mentioned that I could place them on rice paper which I could lay on the cake.

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Posted: 24 February 2010 05:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Where do you get rice papers?

I am making my 1st stacked/tiered cake. I have been reading info everywhere and some people said to cut the dowels flush and others cut dowels 1/4” higher than cake. i’m worried that the frosting touches the bottom of the cake board creating a big bald spot. I am concerned because this sounds like my tiers will be sitting on stilts for 4 hours!  gulp

do you think i can use rice paper for this? will it taste funny? or should i opt to use parchment paper instead?

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Posted: 24 February 2010 09:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I had to send for rice paper, but you might find some in a specialty cake store. As for the dowels, if you go to the wilton.com web site, they have a good tutorial about stacking. Rose’s books have some instruction in The Cake Bible. Also, if you can get ahold of a Wilton book at Michaels or Joannes, they have instructions in the back. If you are flat stacking, (one cake on top of the other) the steps are easy. Personally, I like the plastic hollow dowel rods.  If you are using the white plastic plates with the little feet on them, you place the next size plate on top of the bottom one and slightly push to mark the spots. Lift off and push 1 plastic dowel down to the bottom of the base cake on one of the X.s. Mark where it is level with the top of the cake. Take it out and cut all of the dowels the same size; they have to be or your other tiers won’t sit level and you’ll risk a lopsided, tilting, probably gonna fall cake layers. They are hollow so they are easy to cut. Put them back in all of the X spots, place your plate on them and make sure it sits level on the cake. The dowels should come to the top of the cake and the feet snap in more or less. Sometimes you have to fanaggle a little bit but it should sit down straight. Take the plate off and put your cake on it and so on.  The wooden dowls are kind of done the same way, but you use the cardboard rounds. I just like the plastic better and I think they are sturdier.

Be sure you make the people know that you want your plates and dowels back if you use the plastic ones. Get a deposit and tell them they can get it back when they return your stuff. Make it the cost plus aggravation of replacing things. My own daughter left my stuff $50 worth at the fair last year because she ‘forgot’ to go get the plates and dowels from her daughter’s cakes. I made her pay me!

Good luck.

Colleen

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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jeniyo - 24 February 2010 09:51 PM

Where do you get rice papers?

I am making my 1st stacked/tiered cake. I have been reading info everywhere and some people said to cut the dowels flush and others cut dowels 1/4” higher than cake. i’m worried that the frosting touches the bottom of the cake board creating a big bald spot. I am concerned because this sounds like my tiers will be sitting on stilts for 4 hours!  gulp

do you think i can use rice paper for this? will it taste funny? or should i opt to use parchment paper instead?

Parchment paper will work just fine; it’s easier to find, as well!

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Posted: 25 February 2010 12:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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thank you! You gusy are super helpful!

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Posted: 25 February 2010 05:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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jeniyo - 24 February 2010 09:51 PM

Where do you get rice papers?

I am making my 1st stacked/tiered cake.  I am concerned because this sounds like my tiers will be sitting on stilts for 4 hours!  gulp

Personally, I’d rather have the weight of the upper tiers resting on the “stilts” than the cake(s) beneath, which can cause the cake filling the “bulge”.  Be sure you insert your supports straight.  Any crooked or angled ones can slide under the weight of the tiers above. 

Good luck!

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Posted: 25 February 2010 05:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I second Patricia - having the upper layers rest on the stilts is better, I just put a bit of extra frosting in between to increase the friction between the layers and prevent that the top ones slide off. Parchment will work fine. And I personally don’t invest in hardware other than cardboard cake rounds and straws. Even the cardboard rounds aren’t necessary, I’ve often cut them out of cardboard I had and wrapped them in aluminum foil. Bigger straws like Starbucks or Pearl Tea are better as they are more stable.

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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thank you thank you for the boba straws idea. I haven’t thought of that!

do you guys nix a serving of cake for every big straw stuck in the cake?

doesn’t hurt to be safe.

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Sometimes you can pull the straws out easily, other times you have to kind of cut around them.  I wouldn’t recalculate your cake servings to accommodate the straws - you’ll be fine.
smile

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Haven’t had problems yet getting the straws out, either used (clean) fingernails or tweezers. And thanks for teaching me English, I had no idea that they were called boba straws grin

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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ha! that’s because we’re in CA and i’m Chinese. We grew up slurping the stuff.  cheese

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Silke - 25 February 2010 10:29 PM

I had no idea that they were called boba straws grin

They are also known as Pearl Tea or Bubble Tea Straws.

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Hah! I’m in CA surrounded by Chinese (in Silicon Valley) but being German I haven’t had one till a few years back.

I’ll make sure I’ll have some more on my China trip next month!

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Bubble tea (boba) actually originated in Taiwan in the 80’s. Though in the US you can find it in most asian restaurants smile.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea

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Posted: 25 February 2010 06:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Hm, thanks Jenn! I guess I have to go to the local mall than rather than look for it in China - LOL!

What did we do before we had Wikipedia?

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