Ready to try again…
Posted: 02 March 2010 08:37 PM   [ Ignore ]
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After my last attempt to make white chocolate ganache ended in a big soupy, curdled, yucky mess, I am a little nervous about trying this again.  But today I received a 2.5 kg order of Lindt Piccoli white chocolate.  I plan to freeze most of it but I would like to use some of it for this recipe.  Plus I really want to pair it with the white chocolate mousseline buttercream and either a thin layer of lemon curd or raspberry preserves. 

I just wanted to clarify something before I take the big leap again.  Last time I made it, when I added the white chocolate to the whipped cream I mixed it with the whip attachment on my stand mixer…...followed by tears of sadness when it turned into cottage cheese.  Was I supposed to gently fold the cooled white chocolate into the whipped cream?  I am hoping this was the problem.

Also, one more question.  Why can’t white chocolate ganache be made the same way as dark chocolate ganache?  As in breaking the chocolate into fine pieces in the food processor and then pouring heavy cream (which was heated to the boiling point) over and letting cool until cool enough to whip?  I don’t remember seeing a recipe for it in the cake bible.

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Posted: 02 March 2010 11:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Liza, have you heard from anyone who made this particular recipe and got the results you’re after? Jeanne’s posted ratio of white choc to cream in the thread from your last attempt sent me searching through my books. I, too, had been disappointed in TCB’s white choc ganache. Turns out it was my mistake in choosing that recipe. I’ll explain.

Most of the soft ganache recipes I found have at least half as much chocolate as cream, 4 to 5 oz. choc to 8 oz. cream. Rose’s recipe has 3 oz. choc to 8 oz cream, just under 40%. As Jeanne said, the method is perfect for stabilizing whipped cream. If you read Rose’s intro to the recipe, which I should have done more closely myself, you’ll see that she designed it to serve with berries and such. It’s more like a mousse or a nice topping for Black Forest Cake. You want it to fill a cake, and I wanted a frosting.  I think we both needed a firmer texture.

A medium ganache has the choc and cream in equal ratio 1:1, and a firm ganache uses twice as much choc as cream. The latter is what Jeanne recommended. It’s also the ratio in my CIA recipe for hard ganache. Bonus! The method given is the one you were hoping to use. You can do the same with the 1:1 ratio (medium) or with a soft ganache.

p.s. Forgot to say, the whisk was the right attachment to use. Sounds like a simple case of over-beating. Happens to all of us.

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Posted: 03 March 2010 12:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks Carolita,

I haven’t heard of anyone making this particular recipe from TCB, so I don’t know if anyone else has had success with it.  I guess I am needing a firmer texture for the filling like you said.  I don’t think that I will try this recipe for a filling after reading your post.  I could use a 1:1 ratio of white chocolate/cream for a medium consistency.  My only concern is that it will be way too sweet.

I was just thinking about a tiramisu cake I made last year for my husband.  The filling was Rose’s recipe but I added gelatin to it so that it would be firm enough for a filling.  I had nothing but compliments on the taste.  Wondering if it would pair well with the all occasion downey butter cake and white chocolate mousseline.  I suppose it would be better with a sponge cake but I don’t know if you can bake a sponge cake in an 18 x 12 x2 inch pan.

Wish they wanted Chocolate.  It would be so much easier. Deep chocolate passion cake,  light Whipped ganache for the filling and chocolate neoclassic buttercream for the frosting.  My favourite!!!  Chocolate all the way.  I don’t get too many requests for a white or vanilla cake.

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Posted: 03 March 2010 12:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Liza, I think I tried a higher ratio version several years ago when I was first learning about ganache and playing around with different variations. I don’t remember the exact proportions, but what I do remember was that it was horribly sweet, like you suggest in your post. Unfortunately, it is hard to get around that problem with white chocolate without diluting it a lot as Rose has done. I think that is why a lot of people think they don’t like white chocolate—because of the sweetness. You may just have to play around to find a proportion that suits your tastes. Perhaps you could experiment with a cheaper white chocolate, like Bakers.

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Posted: 03 March 2010 12:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Another option with the 1:1 white choc ganache for a lighter, less sweet flavour is to add an equal amount of cream (by volume) to the chilled ganache. That is, mix white choc into heavy cream that has been brought to a simmer - equal amounts of each. Allow to stand for a minute or so, then stir gently to blend. Cool to room temp, cover with plastic wrap, refrigerate overnight, add cream equal in volume to chilled ganache and whip to desired peaks for use.

Why not try that with a small amount of your Lindt wafers? My favourite brand, btw. Good luck!

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Posted: 03 March 2010 12:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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This sounds like a great idea Carolita.  I will try this tomorrow evening with a small batch to see how it works.

I love the Lindt white chocolate.  Couldn’t help myself today when the package arrived, I had to open it and do some sampling.  (  you know,  just to make sure the chocolate tasted all right.  wink )

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Posted: 03 March 2010 09:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Liza, I have made Rose’s White Ganache successfully.  It is true that it is basically a whipped cream that is stabilized with white chocolate, but like gelatin-stabilized whipped cream, it can be used to frost and fill cakes.  You definitely taste the white chocolate, and anything sweeter would, in my opinion, be too sweet.  If you are only using it for a filling (and not a frosting), very slight overwhipping will not be noticeable.

If you want a denser frosting, white chocolate mousseline or Creme Ivoire would both work.  The creme ivoire sets up with a slightly firm exterior, and is the richest of the three, with the strongest white chocolate flavor.

I feel sure that your white ganache was overwhipped.  This is a function of both whipping temperature (too warm) and how much you whip it.  Perhaps try again with a small portion if this frosting suits your needs.  A few tips:

1. Make sure the melted white choc mixture is cool enough.  Ideally, it will be room temp but not yet starting to firm (set).

2. Make sure your cream is far enough away from being perfectly whipped, so that when you add the white chocolate, you can incorporate the choc without overwhipping.  It is better to add the chocolate too early and sacrifice some volume than to add it too late and overwhip. 

3. Add the choc mix while whipping, i.e., don’t dump it all in at once with the mixer off. 

4. Consider whipping by hand, and stop the moment you see the slightest loss of smoothness. 

Good luck, let us know how it turns out.

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Posted: 03 March 2010 11:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Since I’m not a big fan of “heavy” frostings and fillings I’ve settled on the white ganache in the Cake Bible as my go to frosting for the outside of cakes. I agree with Julie that for a filling it’ll work slightly overbeaten, it still tastes nice, it’s just not as smooth as it could be. It’s a bit tricky to make, I agree. It likes to curdle, even before it’s even close enough to being beaten enough.

One more trick to add to Julie’s list: Ensure that you heat the white chocolate with some of the cream, as instructed in the recipe. I forgot a couple of times and then it becomes near impossible to smoothly incorporate the chocolate in the cream. I find that it works better if I add more of the cream to the chocolate than is indicated in the recipe.

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Posted: 04 March 2010 08:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Great tip, Silke, I’m adding it to my notes!

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Posted: 12 June 2010 01:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I just made this, and now I am wondering if it is strong enough to use as a dam to hold strawberry cloud cream in a cake. Mine worked fine, but I don’t think it’s firm enough. I may try adding a bit of gelatin, as the wedding cake is for tomorrow!

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