My 1938 German Cookbook
Posted: 03 March 2010 03:56 PM   [ Ignore ]
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The discussion elsewhere got me thinking about this book.
The Tyrolese Cookery Book by David De Bethel
I am not a great collector of cookbooks but this was a gift from Dorothy Noe. A dear great aunt who lived in Maine. She married a tall linguist who worked for naval intelligence during the war. He loved France and taught French and fencing at high school. They traveled extensively and she bought this book in London before the war. I thought our German correspondents would find it interesting. It is a slim volume, only 47 pages.

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“This pizza is a symphony of flavors”

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Posted: 03 March 2010 04:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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How cool, Gene! Although you’ll offend any Austrian looking at it, Tirol is in Austria, Suedtirol is Italian (if you’re wondering why so many Italians in the Olympics had German names - they were all from Suedtirol, which is German speaking, and the main part of Italy that has snow!).

I find the combination of recipes on the page you posted interesting - a cake and potatoes in mustard sauce. Hm.

Have you made any of it?

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Posted: 03 March 2010 10:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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No one on this forum has admitted being Austrian so I let that detail slide. The book is a sort of travelogue with the recipes presented from the places the author visited. I haven’t tried any of the recipes. As you can see they are all brief and to the point. “bake about 1/4 hour” Ooookaaaay

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Posted: 03 March 2010 11:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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What a treasure, Gene! Thanks for sharing.

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Posted: 04 March 2010 08:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Awesome book, Gene!  Loved looking at it, the print in the second photo is beautiful.  And the honey-cake recipe is very interesting, sort of a cross between a cookie and a candy.  This is reminding me that I need to try a few recipes from an old Austrian pastry book that someone gave to me after I brought genoise to their house.

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Posted: 08 March 2010 03:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Okay so y’all shamed me into it. I made a batch of Mein Lieblingshonigkuchen.
The first question that occurred to me was the measures. How much was a British ounce in 1938? A bit of Google led me to the conclusion that I would just pretend all of the measures are modern American. Second issue. I went to the cupboard and it was bare of APF. It all got used up for the pizza fest. I had some white whole wheat though and I decided that would be good company with der/die/das honig. Then of course I had no lemons. 4oz of orange zest turns out to be quite a lot. I grew fearful at just over 2 ounces and decided enough. I also could find no baking soda. Argg. I think of myself as a baker? So I used 1 tsp of Rumford. I decided a pinch was 1/4 tsp of cinnamon and nutmeg. Don’t like cloves and I couldn’t fathom what mixed spice might be. There was no salt mentioned. I decided maybe they would have used salted butter so I added 1/4 tsp of salt.
With those deviations in mind I followed the recipe exactly. cheese
Baked at 340 convection for about 10 minutes or until the edges began to brown.
The cookies turned out quite nicely. They did not spread. They rose just enough to dispel heaviness. Pretty good. I will make them again I think. Lemon zest with the orange would be good. Where would the Austrians have gotten lemons and oranges mid winter in the ‘30s do you suppose? Via train from Italy?

I have in mind another recipe from this book that involves many layers of pancakes which are drowned in a custard and baked. Hmmm.

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Posted: 08 March 2010 07:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Gene - 08 March 2010 07:52 AM

With those deviations in mind I followed the recipe exactly. :cheese:

This made me laugh!

I have in mind another recipe from this book that involves many layers of pancakes which are drowned in a custard and baked. Hmmm.

Sounds yummy and interesting- I’ve been wondering about cakes/desserts made from stacks of crepes ever since someone mentioned a cake made of them.  Wonder if this is similar?

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Posted: 08 March 2010 02:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Hey, I’m glad it worked out for you! Austrian sweets are well known, it sounds like the pancake thing will be super yummy! Just thinking about it I want to have it for lunch!

German cookies at least don’t usually spread very much. I got scared with my first American cookies, when they turned into big disks…. Lemons and oranges - yes, from Italy or any other country south of them, around the Mediterranean. Tirol is just behind the border looking from Italy.

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