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substituting regular cocoa for dutch-processed?
Posted: 18 March 2010 09:24 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I want to make Rose’s Chocolate Butter Cake and it calls for dutch-processed cocoa, which I can’t find ANYWHERE. Does anyone know if there’s a way to modify the recipe to use regular cocoa? Thanks for any thoughts!

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Posted: 18 March 2010 09:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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No, this is not an even exchange.  Dutch cocoa is more acidic.  You can buy it online from http://www.penzeys.com

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Posted: 19 March 2010 12:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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perry - 19 March 2010 12:24 AM

I want to make Rose’s Chocolate Butter Cake and it calls for dutch-processed cocoa, which I can’t find ANYWHERE. Does anyone know if there’s a way to modify the recipe to use regular cocoa? Thanks for any thoughts!

In theory you should be able to add natural along with some baking soda to neutralize the acidity.  You’d probably have to remove some baking powder from the recipe.  The Joy of Baking website offers the following conversion:

Substitution for 3 tablespoons (18 grams) Dutch-processed cocoa:  3 tablespoons (18 grams) natural cocoa powder plus pinch (1/8 teaspoon) baking soda

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Posted: 19 March 2010 02:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Charles is correct. It’s the natural cocoa which is more acidic, and Dutched cocoa has been treated to make it more basic or alkaline. It’s called by different names, perry, so you may have found but not recognized it in a store near you. It’s more readily available, actually, than natural cocoa in most places. Check out ingredient labels that say dutched, European style or “cocoa processed with alkali”.

The two can be substituted each for the other, but chefs on both sides of the Atlantic typically prefer dutched because of its darker colour and smoother flavour. Also, it disperses more easily in water - the original reason the method was developed in the early 1800s. Normally the “dutching” is achieved with the use of potassium carbonate in the processing, but the addition of baking soda can also neutralize natural cocoa’s acidic properties.

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Posted: 19 March 2010 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Just a quick note on Dutch Processed cocoa…I couldn’t find it in my supermarkets either.  Then I discovered that the markets in my area keep the dutch processed cocoa (The most common brand in my area is Droste - which is one of the brands that Rose recommends) with the hot chocolate mixes and they stock the natural cocoa (like Hershey’s) with the baking supplies.  Maybe you’ve been looking in the wrong place?  I know I was.

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Posted: 19 March 2010 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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The regular grocery stores in my area don’t carry it either; we do have a gourmet type chain that carries Droste.  I order Callebaut over the web.

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Posted: 19 March 2010 07:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I have heard very good things about the callebaut but have yet to have the chance to use it even though the shop is just 3 blocks away. I am less inclined in the ways of chocolate bakery.

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Posted: 25 January 2012 06:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Along the same vein, what if I only have SACO, which is a blend of BOTH natural & Dutch processed cocoa? Do I alter the recipe’s other ingredients or would it be easier to just buy 100% Dutch processed?

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Posted: 25 January 2012 07:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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LadyHopper - 25 January 2012 10:30 PM

Along the same vein, what if I only have SACO, which is a blend of BOTH natural & Dutch processed cocoa? Do I alter the recipe’s other ingredients or would it be easier to just buy 100% Dutch processed?

Replacing dutched with natural is probably fine, although the reverse may not be true.  Dutched plays no role in the leavening process, so replacing it with natural probably won’t have much effect, since there would be nothing alkaline for it to react to.  However, if your dough IS alkaline, such as through too much baking soda, there is a chance your batter could be overleavened.

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Posted: 11 April 2013 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Can anyone tell me if you have tried using Hershey’s Special Dark Chocolate? It does not compare to the better quality ones like Callebaut and Valhrona. I read that the Special Dark is a blend of dutch-processed and unsweetened (regular) cocoa powders. I would think that this would have been a perfect substitute for dutch processed cocoa. As it turns out, my cake turned tar black in color. Though the flavor remained true to the chocolate flavor I wanted, it just did not look appetizing due to it’s “burnt, charcoal-like” hue.  Any thoughts?

Thanks.

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Posted: 11 April 2013 08:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I like the super dark. I buy come “black” cocoa from King Arthur’s in order to deepen the color of things like brownies. I only use it for a portion of the cocoa.

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Posted: 12 April 2013 09:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I’ve also had cakes made with Hershey’s Special Dark cocoa come out completely black.  I think, but have not tested it to be sure, that this happens more in recipes with a lot of baking soda.  Look for a recipe with all or mostly baking powder and see if it’s better.

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Posted: 14 April 2013 11:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Wanted to report that I baked a test cake yesterday with Hershey’s Special Dark cocoa, and had success by doing two things:

First, I switched the baking soda to baking powder, multiplying the baking soda measurement by four to get the right b powder amount.

Second, I find this cocoa to be quite mild, so I increased the weight by about 23%, subbing it for the same weight of flour.

The cake came out an appealing dark brown but not black (other baking soda cakes I’ve baked with Special Dark have come out completely black), and had just the right amount of cocoa flavor (for me).

Hope that helps!

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Posted: 18 April 2013 04:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Can you please clarify if you meant subbing 23% of cocoa to equal the weight of the flour means reducing the flour by 23% and replacing it with the cocoa?
Thank you for doing a test cake on the Special Dark Cocoa.

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Posted: 19 April 2013 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I have used this cocoa a few times lately because I was interested in gaining some experience with an ingredient that I don’t have to mail order (normally I like Guittard Cocoa Rouge).  The test cake that I baked most recently called for 42g of cocoa, and based on previous experience with the Special Dark, I did two things.  First, I increased the amount of cocoa by 10g, to 52g, and reduced the flour by the same weight, 10g.  So it was 23% of the weight of the cocoa.  Then I switched the baking soda in the recipe to baking powder (multiplying the soda by four to get the equivalent leavening power in baking powder).  Baking soda makes cocoa darker in color and, when it is enough to make it quite dark, makes it milder in flavor.  This was just an adjustment to suit the recipe to my personal taste, which is for a chocolate cake that is full-bodied, not too sweet, and has plenty of chocolate flavor.  Hope that helps!

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Posted: 30 April 2013 09:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I always use normal cocoa instead of Dutch process, and it never makes a difference…

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