Attemping a Wedding Cake first time!  Help!
Posted: 22 March 2010 10:52 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello!

I am volunteered to make my friends wedding cake. A bit daft I admit as I’ve only done one layer birthday cakes and such!

Anyway I am hoping to make a basic yellow/white cake and have fililngs of mango, raspberry and lemon curd for each of the teirs.  I tested out a yellow cake recipe over the weekend…the cake called for 3 3/4 cups cake flour and 2 1/2 cups sugar. I reduced the sugar to 2 cups and still find it a bit too sweet.

I am wondering how far I can cut the sugar and not worry about messing with the cake structure, moistness?

I am also looking at a recipe that just has egg-whites, will that make a cake strong enough to be stacked? I automatically equate egg white cakes to angel cake types and not sure those can be stacked.

Any other advice for a newbie will be greately appreciated as well!

Thank you so much

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Posted: 23 March 2010 09:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Welcome to the forums ym.  I think it would be alot easier for you to find a cake recipe that you like instead of cutting back ingredients because that could affect the structure of the cake.  If you have the Cake Bible, Rose has some excellent yellow/white cake recipes.  Her all occassion downey yellow butter cake is wonderful.  Rose has also provided in her book a chart in which you can scale these recipes to any size cake you want.  I highly recommend her book.  Not only for her recipes, but for the wealth of information she gives.  She has a section in her book for wedding cakes.

If you find some recipes that you would like to try, make some test cakes to see if you like how they bake up, the texture, etc.  I am not sure if an all egg white cake would be a good choice for a wedding cake.  I don’t know if the structure is strong enough to hold up to tiering layers.  I know you can use buttercakes, genoise, carrot cake and cheesecake to build a wedding cake.  I myself have only used buttercakes for tiering and they stand up quite well.

If you do a search on the forums, there is alot of information for building a tiered cake.

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Posted: 23 March 2010 09:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Stacked cakes aren’t really holding the weight of the cakes.. but rather, inserting wooden dowels into the cakes and the use of separator plates is what supports their weight..  You can still use a tender, moist cake and stack them.  I hope this diagram helps a bit.

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Posted: 24 March 2010 10:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Welcome, ym!

Yes to what Liza said, I also recommend The Cake Bible for its wedding cake chapter.  And as RRCos points out, tiered cakes rest on a support system of cardboard rounds and straws or dowels, not directly on the cake below it.  So you don’t have to worry about holding up under the weight of a tier.  But you do need a strong enough structure to keep the cake from falling in the larger pans. 

The Cake Bible’s butter cakes are a not-too-sweet style, give them a try as they are thoroughly tested and may save you a lot of time.  Even if you come up with a recipe that you like, you will still need to alter it and bake test cakes for the larger size tiers.

Good luck!

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Posted: 25 March 2010 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Thank you very much for all the advice!

Yosha

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