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May Bread Bake-Off
Posted: 05 May 2010 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Oh wonderful, Jenn! I’m glad it worked out for you this time!

Regarding the rising high - I don’t know what Rose’s instructions say, but it’s usually the gluten cloak that forms when you’re shaping it that helps the bread to rise up rather than flow outwards. That’s why you fold it, to create surface tension. It’s difficult with very wet doughs, but perhaps next time you want to try to fold it twice in the long direction? Judging from the size of your holes you don’t have problems with gluten development, so you should have enough to make the bread hold together.

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Posted: 05 May 2010 09:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Jenn, nice job!  That texture looks wonderful.  I’d love a slice now, please.  smile

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Posted: 05 May 2010 10:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Bill - I see you’ve never made bread! Wow. I hope you give it a chance. Silke: I can’t buy store-bought bread, at least “artisanal” type. I call it “dead” bread if it hasn’t come out of my own oven. I haven’t been able to branch out much except for my tweaking of Rose’s basic hearth. My typical, if I haven’t planned ahead, is half whole wheat, half bread flour. If I think ahead I soak a seed mix overnight and add that. Last two I’ve put in some buckwheat flour. I do put in old sourdough starter, and some walnuts. I have a bread machine, and lately I’ve done the sponge in there, the autolyse, and then the first rise. Then I take it out for a second rise. When I’m away from home it’s just me, a dough scraper, a bowl, the flour, and an oven. I did it that way 5 months of last year, and got used to doing it the old fashioned way, but at home, when I’m stretched for time, I’ve resorted to the machine.

edit: I’ve made many other breads, but because I’m really stuck for time I’m sticking for now to the hearth bread. I’m itching to try something else. For those who know Lepard’s book (and you can find the recipe on thefreshloaf.com, Lepard’s walnut bread is really to die for. Totally amazing, though I would recommend decreasing the rye a bit. Well, back to grading.

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Posted: 06 May 2010 02:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Julie - 04 May 2010 07:15 AM

Jessie, they look just perfect, congratulations!  What did Hubby think?

Hi Julie! Thanks a bunch =) I have been MIA for a whole, sorry! Hubby devoured them, so did the toddler! I will be making them again very soon I suspect!

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Posted: 06 May 2010 02:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Bill - 04 May 2010 12:09 PM

Great Job.  They look amazing.  I’ve never baked bread…it may be time to get started.

OH my goodness Bill your cakes are incredible! You simply must try bread this month, you’ve got artisan in your blood my friend! Get that cake bible, and join in on the fun =P Thank you for commenting *big smile!*

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Posted: 06 May 2010 02:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Jenn - 05 May 2010 08:41 PM

This is Ciabatta from the Bread Bible. It’s my 2nd time making this - the 1st time was utter failure as I tried to make it by hand and it was too sticky and ended up adding too much flour (rookie’s mistake). This time I actually read the paragraph intro that Rose wrote, where she said that it’s better to mix the dough in the mixer because then you wouldn’t be tempted to add more flour. So that’s what I did.

It taste really great and it’s gone in 2 days. I love the numerous holes that it has. I’m not very satisfied with the shape though, I feel it’s too flat (not high enough). Somehow it rises sideways more than upwards, which I don’t know why. I know that taste is more important but since I’m still struggling with bread baking my goal is to make it look very close to the picture in the book.

Disclosure: I wasn’t going to post this one, was planning on making it again later this month and post both at the same time (hopefully the next time the result will be better). But since Silke was asking where the other bread are in the other thread, I thought well okay maybe I should post anyway cheese.


Oh Jenn, that is stunning. I adore it’s texture, all the holes are so lovely! I also love the crust, it looks so artfully done, like something I would expect to see in a specialty baker’s display. I know we are our own worst critics, you will get it to your satisfaction soon I know that much! I would love to see your second loaf too, it would be neat to see how they differed. Oh, wow. It really really does look incredible!

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Posted: 06 May 2010 12:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Silke - I didn’t fold the dough. If I’m reading the instruction correctly, it says to push the dough on both sides to create the wrinkles, then dimple the dough, then flip it onto baking sheet, then push the sides again, and let it rise. My kitchen was about 70 degrees and I let it rise per instruction. Perhaps next time I will try to fold it first before doing all the above steps. What do you think?

Julie - thanks! I love the texture as well, it’s funny that bread with holes are more desirable. It taste better texturally when it’s not compact. Where I come from people won’t like it because they think you’re trying to cheat them (sell you a big bread that is empty on the inside) LOL.

Jessie - such nice words you wrote! It is true that we are our own worst critic, which is why I said that I’m very pleased with the texture before I “criticize” the shape. Don’t want to give the wrong impression, smile. Though I have to tell you that I did not criticize the Trifle I made, instead my chest was swollen from pride (please forgive the self patting in the back here cheese). I will post the next ciabatta, it’ll be good for comparison!

Now Silke and Julie - where are your breads? smile

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Posted: 06 May 2010 01:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Hm. You have Peter Reinhart’s book, don’t you? What does he say (I’d look, but mine is in a box in the other house….)? I always fold ciabatta - and it’s a pain because it’s so wet!

My burger buns will happen in 2 weeks I think. The cats and I will migrate back to the Bay Area on Sunday (last push to finish the kitchen Saturday - yeah!), and then I’ll travel for a few days, and then I’ll move the kitchen back in. And then I’m back in business I hope!

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Posted: 06 May 2010 01:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Jenn- where is my bread? I just bought wheat berries and honey yesterday, I’m planning to make the 100% whole wheat bread from the blog if I can find a way to grind them with my home equipment.  Also loosely thinking of some semolina and/or durum breads, which are my favorite, maybe later in the month… 

Today I’m making the filling for the RHC lemon crown, made the ladyfingers yesterday and they are in the freezer now (Mother’s Day cake grin )

Silke, I’m so excited for you to be moving into your new kitchen soon!

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Posted: 06 May 2010 01:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Julie - 06 May 2010 04:22 PM

Silke, I’m so excited for you to be moving into your new kitchen soon!

Oh, me too! Although they were very fast, considering all the problems we had - 8 weeks including taking out a weight bearing wall, working through a roof leak, and refinishing the floor…. But it’s time, the ski areas are closing, but there still is too much snow to go mountain biking. And I miss my Bay Area friends! And baking without altitude challenges….

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Posted: 06 May 2010 01:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Silke - Rose’s Bread Bible is the only bread book I have. My cookbook collection is pretty slim. The Peter Reinhart book was from the library - I was checking it out.
I did search on his ciabatta recipe on google successfully, and yes he did say to fold once on the long side. So will have to try this for sure.
Just remembered, I would do you proud, sort of red face , I used my bench scraper to move the dough from the countertop to the silpat mat.

I’m excited about your kitchen too. It does feel fast, your contractor friend must be very efficient.

Julie, happy Mother’s day to you! Tthe lemon crown sounds heavenly. You will post the result? I’d love to see it!

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Posted: 06 May 2010 02:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Julie - do you have a grain mill? I’m still on the fence trying to decide whether I should get one.

The lemon crown looks awesome, and I have all the ingredients, but zero freezer space.

Jenn - very proud of you! The folding should help you with the shape of the ciabatta. Let us know!

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Posted: 07 May 2010 09:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Jenn, thanks for the good wishes, I chose the lemon crown party because I love all things lemon, but also so I wouldn’t have to lift a finger on Mother’s Day, other than to pull it out of the freezer.  :)

Silke, I would love to get a grain mill, something that can produce excellent, finely milled flour from wheat berries and also from nuts (especially nuts, I use nut flours more often than whole wheat).  I just haven’t been able to find a strong, specific recommendation on a product that’s currently available.  Anyone have one that they’ve used to make nut flour?

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Posted: 07 May 2010 10:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Silke, I’ve been thinking about buying a grain mill for several years. Haven’t taken the plunge yet - I’ve considered many different types. In an Amazon splurge the other day I bought one of those grain flakers. Haven’t used it yet. Apparently it can also grind flour, but I don’t think it would be too efficient. The idea of rolling one’s own grains, making cracked wheat, etc., has been appealing to me, and it was fairly inexpensive.

Beth

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Posted: 07 May 2010 10:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Julie - I think you’d need a completely different machine. I think most grain mills say that they aren’t suitable for nuts. Let me know what you can find out. Some grinders aren’t even suitable for the more oily seeds, etc

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