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Aluminized Steel
Posted: 26 May 2010 11:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Vanie, perhaps do a search both here on the forum and over on the blog and you’ll find Rose’s recommendations on pans.

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Posted: 27 May 2010 01:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Stainless steel pans are not good for baking? I definitely wasn’t expecting that! Thought the years, I’ve been concerned about the use of aluminum pans: Scientific researches has shown that, people whom died with Alzheimer, had much more aluminum in their brains then those ones that had died from another disease. Aluminum is a heavy metal, and it can be poisonous. There’s no way to know (at least for now) if the amount of this metal we get while baking, is going to show us its side effects in the future.
I know, sometimes, Science says one thing today and then, years later, it says another completely different one, but it doesn’t make my worries disappear. I’ll have to think about it. Anyway, I’m going to keep distance from stainless steel pans.

Thanks you all!

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Posted: 27 May 2010 01:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Yes, I agree with Charles, I wouldn’t use stainless steel for baking, although I understand your concerns about aluminum. I just try to think I’m not really using it that often. Aluminum heats up and cools off very quickly—same reason it was popular for those metallic drink tumblers in the 50s smile

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Posted: 27 May 2010 10:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Vanie - 27 May 2010 04:06 AM

Scientific researches has shown that, people whom died with Alzheimer, had much more aluminum in their brains then those ones that had died from another disease.

That result has been known for over 30 years, and in all that time, there has been no evidence discovered that links Alzheimer’s with aluminum consumption.  No reputable medical authority thinks that it does and it has been looked at extensively.  The aluminum in the brain is a result, not a cause of Alzheimer’s.

Aluminum bakeware is perfectly harmless and most often the best choice in terms of performance.

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Posted: 27 May 2010 11:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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I think I can deal with aluminum for baking. I’m really interested to learn how to do it well.
I heard about it very recently, but if this discussion is antique, I can make a search for that. Just to make me fell better when using my next aluminum pan. 
Charles, I hope you’re all right!  grin

I have 2 more questions:

1) Can those dark spots I’ve mentioned (in a non stick pan), spoil the cake?

2) Charles says those yellow spots in my non stick muffin pan can be, maybe, polymerized oil. What exactly is that means? Can it cause any kind of problem to the cupcakes or something else I’ll be baking on that pan?

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Posted: 27 May 2010 12:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Vanie - 27 May 2010 02:43 PM

if this discussion is antique, I can make a search for that. Just to make me fell better when using my next aluminum pan.

It is indeed very old.  When the association first was discovered, people became paranoid by everything that contains aluminum.  Anti-perspirant, antacid tablets, water filtration systems, medication, our water supply, etc.  We get aluminum in our diets from many different sources, but most of it is excreted by our kidneys.  If there were any strong connection between eating the stuff and Alheimer’s, we’d likely know about it.  If there is any connection, it must be very small.  This overall is a problem that accusations tend to be sticky; if somone accuses a politician of dishonesty, you can never quite view him in the same way, no matter how thoroughly he’s vindicated.  I do understand the anxiety, but if we are to live in peace, we have to act on the best knowledge that we have, even though our knowledge is never perfect.

Can those dark spots I’ve mentioned (in a non stick pan), spoil the cake?

I’ve never seen such dark spots, but I’ve never had a cake ruined by anything to do with a pan, only my own ineptitude.  grin

says those yellow spots in my non stick muffin pan can be, maybe, polymerized oil. What exactly is that means? Can it cause any kind of problem to the cupcakes or something else I’ll be baking on that pan?

When you bake anything that has oil in it in a pan, some of the oil becomes baked on to the pan and becomes almost impossible to remove.  This is how cast iron skillets become non-stick;  they start off brown with the baked on oil (polymerized oil), but then turn black.  This stuff is unattractive, but harmless, and may actually improve the pan performance.  However, I always use parchment for my baking sheets, so they stay unblemished.  The trays I used for roasting things have become almost black.

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Posted: 27 May 2010 01:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Charles, you’re awesome! LOL

My concern about the dark spots, came of the fact I heard somewhere, it could cause the cake do not bake uniformly. I mean, the pan would be hotter, where the spots are. That’s why I was so concerned about it.

Thanks for all of your explanation!!

P.S.: By the way, how can I bring here, what somebody else has said no the FORUM, like you have done? Sorry, I’m a kind of dummy!  red face

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Posted: 27 May 2010 02:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Vanie - 27 May 2010 04:27 PM

My concern about the dark spots, came of the fact I heard somewhere, it could cause the cake do not bake uniformly.

If there are variations on the outside of the pan, it probably does cause *some* variation in the browning of the crust of the cake, but also consider that since aluminum is such a good conductor, the increased temperature will tend to equalize.  And not everyone disapproves of the extra browning of the cake; Cooks Illustrated rather likes it, because they feel it adds flavor.

While a lot of critiques might be *technically* true, I’m skeptical that we see a lot of real world evidence of them.  I suspect that the heat distribution within the oven is a bigger source of uneven baking than are our cake pans, even if you bought the cheapies at the supermarket.  I’ve read on many baking forums that these Airbake type pans don’t brown cookies well, but I know from having had them for years, they certainly do.  And in side-by-side tests with solid aluminum sheet pans, I couldn’t tell the difference between the browning results. 

I think that our technique has a greater effect on our products than our equipment does.  There is a saying that I’m sure you’ve heard:  “It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools.”  That said, I enjoy using well-built tools.

P.S.: By the way, how can I bring here, what somebody else has said no the FORUM, like you have done? Sorry, I’m a kind of dummy!  red face

Are you referring to the quoting?  You need to surround their text with [quote] their text here [/quote]

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Posted: 27 May 2010 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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?It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools.?

I’m trying - hard - do not be a poor crafstman, Charles.


Thanks so much for your time and patience!  grin

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Posted: 07 June 2010 12:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Charles, thank you for the recommendation.  I thought I’d include a picture of the cookie sheet since it is so unusual…does this look like polymerized oil? You can see where I scratched the heck out of the pan trying to remove it.  : (

CharlesT - 24 May 2010 03:20 AM
Loopy - 23 May 2010 11:55 PM

Charles, sorry to hear about the rust.  Speaking of aluminum pans (sorry, not completely unrelated but maybe a little off-topic), I have the WearEver model 5314, 13 gauge aluminum cookie sheet, which discolored the very first time I used it.  I baked little parmesan crisps on parchment, and the twelve little Parmesan outlines stayed on the sheet and never left.  I tried scrubbing them off once, which was a mistake and only scratched the pan.  Other than appearance, it works fine, no warping etc. but I have always been mystified as to the instant discoloration.  Does anyone know why this happens, and is there something special I should have done to care for/season the pan initially?  Thanks!

Maybe your spots are polymerized oil.  This is the toughest thing to get off aluminum.  I’ve had some success with “Goof Off”, the little yellow can you find at the hardware store to remove paint.  Apply a little bit and some gentle rubbing with a paper towel and it will remove the hardened oil.

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Posted: 07 June 2010 12:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Loopy - 07 June 2010 03:02 AM

does this look like polymerized oil?

Not to me.  I think of polymerized oil as yellow or brownish, but maybe what you have is just the first stages.  Still, I took some of that goof off and rubbed a spot on my baking sheet and it turn bright and shiny.  It took a number of applications, though and my paper towel was covered with some greenish blue stuff.  I’d take a picture of it, but the batteries of my camera need recharging.  No decent light, anyway.

Also, you might try abrasives that have much smaller particles than stuff like comet, etc.  I’m sure they make an aluminum polish, which you might find at an AutoZone.  And then there’s silver polish.  Small particles make surfaces shiny, big particles make them dull.

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Posted: 07 June 2010 09:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Loopy - 07 June 2010 03:02 AM

You can see where I scratched the heck out of the pan trying to remove it.

Loopy: 

I bought some aluminum polish at AutoZone during lunch today and attacked one of my sheet pans with it when I got home.  It now shines almost like Sterling Silver.  I bet it would remove your scratches.

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