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Making my own wedding cakes…timing help, advice?
Posted: 26 February 2008 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I can get it ready-made, but when I roll it out, I can never get it rolled out really thin.  I know it’s not supposed to be super-thin, but if it’s too thick, it tastes icky, like I’m eating plastic.  LOL!

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Posted: 27 February 2008 01:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Patrincia - 26 February 2008 04:45 PM

I can’t open the link, but wow…. the attire sounds amazing.

I can’t help you with a fruitcake recipe, but Rose’s white, yellow and chocolate cakes are all wonderful.  Her Mousseline buttercream is safe at room temp for up to 2 days, and her ganache is safe at room temp for 3 days - I’d stick with those for your fillings too (stay away from anything perishable).  You can make all your cake layers, buttercreams, and/or ganaches long in advance and store in the freezer (I would highly suggest purchasing one of the new Reynold’s Handi-Vacs and the accompanying 1 gallon sized bags to store your components completely airtight in the freezer).  Then assemble the day or night before you need them and store in the fridge until it’s time to go (I like to put a couple of boxes of fresh baking soda in the fridge when I have to store a cake - added insurance if you know what I mean).  Better yet, store them in the fridge inside bakery boxes (my bakery sells them inexpensively).  Transport the cakes cold.

Hi Patrincia,
How long does it take to thaw the cake layers and the icing?  Should I just let them sit in the fridge overnight?  (I guess, my questions is how will I know it’s ready to frost?)

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Posted: 27 February 2008 02:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Hi Amy -  Thaw times will depend on the size of your cakes layers or batches of buttercreams.  Cakes thaw relatively quickly and don’t need to be completely thawed before you start frosting them.  Buttercream takes a bit longer - I ususally put frozen bc in the fridge the night before I need it, then leave it on the counter for a few hours before it reaches room temp (don’t forget to re-whip it briefly to restore it’s consistancy).  You can certainly thaw both cakes and bc directly on the counter - either way you choose to do it, be sure to keep everything wrapped well during the thawing period (so any condensation that forms will form on the outside of the wrapping).

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Posted: 27 February 2008 02:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Jeannette,

Your recipe is for an 11” cake.  I have 10"x2” pans.  Will that work, or does it change the bake time?

Also, would you layer this recipe in a wedding cake?  Would I double this recipe and that will make two 10” layers?  If so, what icing do you fill it with?

If I don’t use royal icing or fondant, will buttercream work okay, or would it taste funny together?

Thanks ladies!  It’s Wednesday!  Woohoo!  Week’s 1/2 over, thank goodness…

-Amy

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Posted: 27 February 2008 03:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Amy,  the recipe is for an 11inchX 3inch tin. It is not a layer cake, it is packed with fruit so it doesn’t need a filling.  I have never known this type of cake to be iced with buttercream so can’t say whether it would be suitable but I don’t think it would work. Some people who don’t like icing just use marzipan(almond paste)but that is unusual,,most use Royal or Fondant .  This recipe would fill an 11inch round or a 10 inch square tin.  Do you have these size tins?  In the book there are recipe amounts for other size tins from 6 inch - 11 inch, all deep tins. If you let me know the size of tin you can get I can give you the right amounts of ingredients to use. 
  The marzipan should be put on 2 weeks before the wedding, and you can ice it a week or so later.  In the book it says an 11 inch cake will serve between 55- 75 guests.  I would gladly make it for you if I lived near enough! grin

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Posted: 27 February 2008 03:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Well, my glass cake stand is circular, 12” edge to edge.  So I looked for an 11” tin, and couldn’t find one (locally at least).  I’ve found 8”, 10”, 12”, and larger (they’re all 2” high).  I did find a 10"x3” circular tin, though.

10-11” isn’t very big—even at 3” tall, I’m amazed it’ll feed so many guests.  I suppose the pieces are small since it’s so heavy.

If you lived near enough, I’d definitely be taking you up on that offer!  grin

-Amy

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Posted: 27 February 2008 03:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Jeannette,
I Googled “Traditional English Fruitcake Wedding” and found some pictures where people have stacked the cakes in tiers.  Is that possible w/ the fruitcake?  If so, then I could do a 10” round and a 6” or 8” round for the top tier, right?

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Posted: 27 February 2008 04:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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It is becoming fashionable over here now to serve stacked cakes as in USA.  usually they are tiered with pillars between the cakes or sometimes on special cake stands hired out by cake suppliers.  The cake is cut into smallish pieces, about 3X2X1 inch., depending on the number of guests.  At my daughter’s wedding there were about 120 guests and she had a 3 tier cake but the top cake wasn’t used on the wedding day, in fact I think she had it as her first Christmas cake, it kept perfectly even though I’d made it probably in April!  If you are having butter cakes as well as the fruit cake ,do you think you need a tiered cake?  I have read that fruit cakes are not so popular with Americans so perhaps a 10 inch cake would suffice?  Anyway, if you want any more info. I’ll gladly type it out for you,so don’t hesitate in asking.

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Posted: 27 February 2008 04:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Okay—I’ll just do the 10” cake.  That’ll be easier on me, anyway.  grin  At the very least, I could dress up the top with flowers to give it height.  I have some silk flowers leftover from my bouquet.  Thanks again!

Let me know if the ingredients you sent will work for a 10” tin.  Thanks!
-Amy

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Posted: 27 February 2008 05:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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You’ll need to scale down a bit for a 10 inch tin.  The book gives amounts for the 11 inch tin and a 9 inch tin so I’ve calculated an amount between the two for you.
Here goes- - 1lb 10 ozs. currants;  10 ozs each of raisins and sultanas;  3ozs each of peel and cherries;  13oz flour; salt and spices the same ; 1 1/2 of treacle;
13ozs each ofsugar and butter; 6 eggs; 3ozs almonds; rind of 1 lemon and 1 orange.  I hope this works out alright for you. The book also gives amounts for a 6 inch cake so if you feel the 10 inch is not sufficient you could stack the smaller one on top.  There are lots of websites with wedding cake ideas for you to look at, I’m sure you have lots of ideas of your own though.  The flowers idea sounds lovely. I do admire you doing all this work yourself, are you a trained dressmaker?

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Posted: 27 February 2008 05:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Awesome!  Thanks so much!

I’m not really “trained” as in schooling of any kind…but I’ve been sewing since I was a wee thing.  My mother sewed all our clothes growing up, and I learned at her knee, sewing doll clothes and such.  As an adult, I didn’t sew much for myself, but when I was in my early-mid 20s, I was introduced to Civil War Reenacting, so the historical clothing bug infected me pretty badly.  I pretty much don’t sew anything these days unless it’s something historical using patterns from the mid-19th century, be it clothing, quilts, or novelty items.  I love getting patterns from Godey’s Ladies Book and making dresses out of them—or recreating original garments, like my wedding dress.  It’s so much fun!  Tailoring for men was a whole new experience for me, that’s for sure.

I have made dresses for others—but I have the worst time fitting people at a distance.  That’s where my lack of training knocks me down.  So I’ve only made things for my fiance and my friends who live nearby.

-Amy

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Posted: 27 February 2008 06:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Thanks for telling me about yourself, we have a lot in common although I guess I’m much older than you!  I have always loved all needle skills, knitting, crochet, embroidery af all kinds, I’ve even made quilts!  I have one daughter and two sons, my daughter and younger son are twins.  My daughter has taken after me , in that she also likes sewing and although she didn’t make her wedding gown she did make her young bridesmaid’s dress which was beautiful.  She is a perfectionist, the dress could have been worn inside out , it was as neat on the inside as it was on the outside!  She also started like you, making doll’s clothes and then progressing to some for herself.  Alas, she is now a very busy mother of two girls so gets very little time for sewing and actually it is cheaper to buy than to make your own now. C’est la vie!
I’ve just been looking at your blog again and I marvel at all your efforts, if I was your mother I would be so proud of you, as I’m sure your mother must be!Good luck!
Jeannette. grin

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Posted: 27 February 2008 06:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Thank you!  grin  You make me feel so happy!

I do plan on making a quilt to commemorate my wedding—my first quilt!  grin  (well, if you don’t count an Irish chain I tried when I was a kid.  Irish chain and log cabin never did much for me… straight lines, I guess.)

I want an autograph quilt (signature quilt?), which I heard was popular back then.  So I’ll be sending out bits of cotton fabric for my friends and family to write their names on.  I haven’t decided on a pattern yet…looking for something that would have existed in 1860.  I adore the Peony pattern, but I’ve never seen any like that with signatures on it.  If you have any suggestions or books, let me know!  My email is .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or you can PM me.

Take care,
Amy

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Posted: 27 February 2008 07:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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US wedding cake portions are typically 4 x 2 x .5-inches.  I prefer a little larger slice. 

Some things to keep in mind… will the wedding cake be the only dessert served?  If so, plan to serve larger pieces.  Also, if you serve more than one cake flavor, your guests will want to sample more than one.  The reception time will play a role in the mix too… so much to think about smile.

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Posted: 27 February 2008 07:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Jeannette, over on this side of the Atlantic raisins are usually seedless. I guess we Americans are wimps about seeds. wink

Currants can be hard to find or expensive. Sometimes I just chop raisins coarsely instead. Not as elegant but it works.

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