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Making my own wedding cakes…timing help, advice?
Posted: 27 February 2008 07:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Barbara - Do you have a Super Wal-Mart?  They carry dried currants, located just next to the raisins, and are only slightly more expensive.

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Posted: 28 February 2008 06:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Thanks for your input , girls, it’s funny how something as simple as fruit cake can have so many problems!  It didn’t occur to me when I first started using American recipes that I’d have problems with something so simple as flour! That’s where Kate came in, we contacted each other and she started her experiments, you know the rest of the story. Our raisins are also seedless, Barbara, but Amy said she didn’t know what sultanas were, the dictionary defines them as seedless raisins!  Because we can buy them readily I’ve never thought about the differences ,they are very like raisins, slightly bigger and a little darker.  They can be interchanged in a recipe without any problems.
The information about number of servings that I have given Amy is what I copied from my recipe book where it states that an !!inch cake would serve 55-75 guests. I presume it means for a uk wedding, perhaps as you say, Patrincia, Americans are used to larger servings.  I have offered to send out the amounts for a 6 inch cake which could be stacked or tiered on top of the 10 inch one if Amy would need it.  It is quite a complicated business, what with the sizes of tins being different and the ingredients not being quite the same!LOL. 
I hope , in spite of these complications, her wedding is a big success after all this hard work!

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Posted: 28 February 2008 10:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Ooh, I’ve found currants at Whole Foods in their dried fruits section.  It wasn’t a brand name—just Whole Food’s packaging.

-Amy

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Posted: 28 February 2008 10:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Well, you ladies can bet I’ll be in touch throughout this cake-making process.  grin  I’ll go look through all my tins and see what I have.  I’m sure I have a 6”, though.  It would look good on a 10” cake, no?  I’m going to go ahead and do Royal Icing on it.  My friends are kind of excited—they are curious to try out this “new” cake…  LOL!

-Amy

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Posted: 28 February 2008 12:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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For your information, I have been looking up the difference between raisins and sultanas and it is as I suspected, there is not a great deal of difference, they both start out as white grapes but go through a different process in drying.  I think what we call sultanas are sometimes known as Golden raisins in the USA.  I hope this helps a bit in clearing up questions about ingredients.

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Posted: 28 February 2008 01:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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I’m not sure if this was brought up already, but regarding the refridgeration of the cake, I wonder if the hotel would be kind enough to let you store you finished cake in the fridges?  Maybe you can ask and see if they will.  They can then take it to the presentation table on the time youu specify.

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Posted: 28 February 2008 01:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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jeannette - 28 February 2008 10:15 AM

The information about number of servings that I have given Amy is what I copied from my recipe book where it states that an !!inch cake would serve 55-75 guests. I presume it means for a uk wedding, perhaps as you say, Patrincia, Americans are used to larger servings.

Hi Jeanette,

Please know my comments were not meant to contradict yours at all.  My intention was only to give Amy a few thoughts to consider to help her determine what size cakes she’ll need (things most first-time wedding cake makers most likely would not know to consider).

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Posted: 28 February 2008 01:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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No offence taken at all, Patrincia!  I am no expert at baking , just a keen home cook, but when my daughter got married she wanted as much as possible to have everything home based, not commercial, if you know what I mean.  Her cake was made by me and iced and decorated by my neighbour who used to do it as a home based business.  It turned out very well and all guests commented on the moistness and flavour of the cake, probably because a lot of commercially made cakes can be quite dry.  When I saw Amy’s request for a fruit cake recipe I waited to see if anyone over there(USA) would offer a recipe and when none appeared I jumped in feet first!!  I just hope it turns out well for her, I know it would if made here with our ingredients because I have made it so many times.  It really is a good recipe, that’s if you like fruit cake, of course,LOL LOL

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Posted: 28 February 2008 01:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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Jeanette - your fruitcake recipe is probably as authentic as they come!  And what a nice story of how you baked your daughter’s cake and your friends/neighbors decorated it… such an expression of love!

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Posted: 28 February 2008 01:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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rose villanueva - 28 February 2008 05:04 PM

I’m not sure if this was brought up already, but regarding the refridgeration of the cake, I wonder if the hotel would be kind enough to let you store you finished cake in the fridges?  Maybe you can ask and see if they will.  They can then take it to the presentation table on the time youu specify.

Great idea Rose V.  Was it Rose LB that suggested an alternative of storing cakes in a wine storage area instead of a restaurant/hotel walk-in refrigerator?  Wine storage areas are less likely to contain onion or fish odors, and they get minimal traffic flow. 

I’d think twice about refrigerating a cake covered in royal icing though.  What is the practice in the UK Jeanette?

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Posted: 28 February 2008 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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As far as i know, a cake iced with Royal icing would not be kept in a ‘fridge, it would be kept in an airtight container in a cool place. Refridgeration would cause condensation on the surface, I would think, wouldn’t you?  The actual cake, ie. the fruit mix, would certainly not need to be refridgerated, the amount of fruit and spirit in it keeps it moist for months! raspberry

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Posted: 06 March 2008 08:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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Hi ladies!
Okay, this weekend I tested out the white and chocolate butter cakes -and-  mousseline buttercream (yum!), regular buttercream, and chocolate ganache (double yum!)  -and-  the chocolate fondant (omg!  It’s turns your cake into a chocolate bar!)  Death by chocolate, indeed!

So, now I’m trying to figure out my cake display.  I have a cake stand that is loverly and old-fashioned looking, but it’s square and I kind of like how it looks with a round cake on it.  The stand also has sides that slope upwards slightly, which makes a space underneath the cake and at the corners.  (see attachment)  How do I fill the space on the bottom so that I don’t have a cake that ends up not level?
-
amy

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Posted: 07 March 2008 12:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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Lovely cake stand Amy.  The easiest way I can think of the “level” the stand would be to put how ever many smaller cake rounds it takes, under the finished wedding cake, to make the cake sit level with the edges of the stand.  Hope I explained that clearly… if not, let me know and I’ll try again. 

Also, I’d place a piece of non-slip grippy stuff under the smaller cardboard rounds, then glue the rounds together (to each other), and then place another piece of grippy stuff on top of the rounds (between the stack of glued rounds and the wedding cake).  This will keep all the bits and pieces from slipping and sliding around.

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Posted: 07 March 2008 10:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Gotcha.  I’ll try that.  Good idea on the non-slip grippy stuff.  I didn’t even think of that.

The other problem here is that the stiffness of the cake round that the first tier sits on will make a space at the corners where the cake stand slopes down into the center.  Should I just flood that space with icing when I do the piping around the bottom edge?

Amy

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Posted: 07 March 2008 12:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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If I’m understanding you correctly, you can use either icing or greenery to fill the gap between the cake stand and the bottom tier.

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