Robin hood best for blending flour
Posted: 15 June 2010 01:04 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I am just wondering if this flour is similar to wondra flour.  has anyone ever used it?  I am not sure how to determine what the protein amount is.  In RHC Rose states that the percentage of protein for wondra is 9.8 percent.  On the label for the robin hood best for blending flour it states there is 4 grams of protein per 1/4 cup.  I am just wondering if I can use it in place of wondra flour for genoise.

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Posted: 15 June 2010 01:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Liza - 15 June 2010 04:04 PM

I am just wondering if this flour is similar to wondra flour.  has anyone ever used it?  I am not sure how to determine what the protein amount is.  In RHC Rose states that the percentage of protein for wondra is 9.8 percent.  On the label for the robin hood best for blending flour it states there is 4 grams of protein per 1/4 cup.  I am just wondering if I can use it in place of wondra flour for genoise.

On the web site, it says that the 1/4 cup is 30 grams, so if you take 4/30 = 13.3 percent protein, which is a lot higher than cake flour.  Plus, the web site indicates only that it’s finely milled; I gather that Wondra is pregelatinized so that it blends better than plain flour.

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Posted: 15 June 2010 02:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thank-you Charles.  I wasn’t sure how to determine the percentage.  I will stick with Rose’s substitution of cake flour and cornstarch.

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Posted: 15 June 2010 05:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Liza,

I have used this flour to make Rose’s genoise successfully. I looked on their website and they state that “Best For Blending Flour is milled using a special process to provide you with a granular flour that blends easier into wet or dry ingredients with less dusting or clumping than regular flours”- this sounds very similar to wondra flour.
I think that the calculation of protein by the previous poster is incorrect.
120 grams (1 cup) of Robin Hood product contains 12 grams of protein
120 grams (1 cup) of Wondra contains 11.7 grams of protein—- 9.8 percent protein means 9.8 grams for 100 grams Wondra so the calculation is
9.8/100=x/120
x=9.8x120/100
x=11.7

I would go ahead and use the product.

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Posted: 15 June 2010 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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jan - 15 June 2010 08:19 PM

120 grams (1 cup) of Robin Hood product contains 12 grams of protein

Where are you getting this data?  Their web site says the flour has 4 grams per 1/4 cup (30 g), which equates to 16 grams per cup of flour (120 g).

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Posted: 15 June 2010 10:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I find the nutritional info. on Canadian flour to be annoying.  With a 1/4 cup or 30g serving size, the rounding error alone is huge! The 30g serving size (to my knowledge) is standardized.  I have used the best for blending in pies (did have some shrinkage even after chilling so the extra protein makes sense) but it did seem to work ok in the angel food cake, but I didn’t do a side by side test so I wouldn’t know with certainty.  I believe I saw Wondra at Walmart, so even in Canada, you could get your paws on it.

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Posted: 15 June 2010 11:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Charles you are correct, I was in a rush to get to an appointment and did the math too quickly. I quoted information about how the flour is made from the website though -so that is correct.  I used it with great success in the genoise and the cake was not tough at all and it rose to full height. I have also tried it in angel food cake and it worked well there too.  I haven’t found Wondra where I live so I find the Robin Hood product an acceptable substitute. I prefer it to cornstarch/flour mixture because I don’t like the flavour of cornstarch in cakes.

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Posted: 16 June 2010 07:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Rose now recommends potato starch instead of cornstarch when cutting flour for butter cakes, it might work as well as cornstarch in genoise.

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Posted: 17 June 2010 12:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I never even thought to look in Walmart.  Next time I am there I’ll have a look.  It would be nice if they had it there.

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