2 of 2
2
Springform pan vs. cheesecake pan
Posted: 23 July 2010 11:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  610
Joined  2010-06-07

I found that hard to do. I had to wait until the cake cooled a little and then I slid it onto a cake lifter and then the cooling rack.  The parchment took even longer to remove confused

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2010 08:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3168
Joined  2010-04-25

I think I know what you’re talking about, there, Missy. When I made my apple crumb in my springform, I put parchment on the bottom as well. Then, when I went to remove the bottom, it was like, a permanent fixture on the bottom of the cake!! I was a bit nervous about it. What I did was take a long bread knife and put it between the parchment and the bottom (my springform has a glass bottom), and spun it. It worked wonderfully! Then I just peeled off the parchment. I think you could also use a really flat metal pancake turner and sort of put it in and pull it out. Anyway, it wasn’t as bad as I thought, but boy, was it STUCK TO THAT CAKE!!!!!

I wonder if someone knows an even better way of removing the disk from the bottom of the cake?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2010 12:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  610
Joined  2010-06-07

That is exactly what happened.  Also, the bottom of the pan seemed welded to the cake too.  I the it cool a little because I was afraid of breaking the cake.  I have the Wilton cake turner.  As the cake cooled, I very carefully slid the cake turner under the cake and that is how I peeled off the parchment. But, a knife is a great idea. I never thought of that. Thanks, Anne

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2010 01:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1076
Joined  2007-11-15

Did you grease before you put down the parchment and then again when the parchment was in place? I just slip a little spatula underneath while it sits on a cake rack, and slide out the bottom piece. I find it easier than flipping a traditional cake pan. I do leave the parchment on while it cools.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2010 05:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3168
Joined  2010-04-25

Thanks, Matthew! I definitely greased pan and parchment. Nice to know you can cool on parchment, by the way. I thought it would have to come off for better circulation. I’ll try the spatula trick. The knife makes a little nervous, because, even though it worked great, as I was doing it, I was a bit afraid of jabbing the cake while I’m doing it, so I’ll try that.

On the whole, though, I actuall prefer flipping from a regular pan.  My experience is more limited than many, though, so who knows…time will tell!

Matthew, is it definitely okay to cool on parchment—circulation/cooling/potential sogging-wise???  If so, that would make my life much easier, ans my cooling racks can tend to cut into my cake a bit sometimes, and that would prevent that bit of trouble.

Thanks again!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 July 2010 10:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  610
Joined  2010-06-07

Thank you Matthew. I greased the parchment too. I was able to remove the parchment once the cake had cooled a little

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 October 2010 12:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
Newbie
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  6
Joined  2010-10-05

I don’t know about other folks, but for me I LOVE the Kaiser LaForme line of springform pans for my cheesecakes. The reason that I love them is because they do not leak and are guaranteed not to do so for the life of the user. I have a 9-inch and a 10-inch pan by Kaiser, and I have never had to wrap these pans in foil to keep them from leaking. They fit wonderfully inside of a 12-inch Wilton wedding cake pan that I use for my water baths when I am baking cheesecakes. I am no expert, Lord knows, but I can say that I have used several brands of springforms when I was trying to learn how to bake them successfully. Once I found Kaiser at Williams Sonoma, paid the $40 for it, I have never looked back. I don’t believe that I will ever use another brand. They are nonstick, the buckles would great, and absolutely NO leakage whatsoever. What else could a baker wish for?

http://springform-pan.kaiserbakeware.com/La-Forme-Plus-Springform-Pan-Flat-Base-Leakproof-9-Inch-plu7006370200.html

Linda

 Signature 

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c285/LHensens/lindabttfytulips.gif

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 October 2010 08:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  34
Joined  2008-02-14

I am almost ready to pay the $40 something in William Sonoma for the Kaiser Pan is it really worth it?? Please let me know question Regards.

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 2
2
Back to top