1 of 2
1
tube pan cake sinks
Posted: 07 July 2010 07:54 AM   [ Ignore ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  41
Joined  2009-10-09

I’ve been having generally good results with most of the tube pan cakes in Rose’s Heavenly Cakes but in a couple of instances the cakes rose to about 3/4 inch to an inch from the top of the pan, or near the top of the center tube and then sunk considerably.

The texture was fine but I’m wondering if anyone knows what might be causing this.  The most recent instance was with teh whipped cream cake on page 29.

I’ve got two oven thermometers, preheated the oven.  I’m using a ten cup fluted metal tube pan.  My understanding is that too much leavening is often the culprit in this situation.

Thanks

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 08:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4783
Joined  2008-04-16

hds, is the cake dipping in the middle (middle meaning halfway between the outer edge and inner tube, not the part closest to the center tube) or is it cooling flat (or domed) in the middle?

Butter cakes do tend to shrink some after you take them out of the oven (if they shrink while still in the oven they are overbaking), and you mention that the texture is fine, so I wonder if this is what you’re seeing?

If the cake really is falling by dipping in the middle, then it could be underbaking (oven too cool or not long enough baking time) or undermixing. As you mention it could also be too much leavening, are your measuring spoons accurate? You didn’t accidentally substitute baking soda for powder, did you?

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Cultured Butter Recipe

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 08:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2010-04-25

I can’t answer your dipping question (although I am very interested in the details and possible resolution), but I’d love to hear all about the whipped cream cake.  That cake always catches my attention, but I"ve not yet had occasion to make it.  Do you love it?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 09:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  210
Joined  2009-10-01
Anne in NC - 07 July 2010 11:44 AM

I can’t answer your dipping question (although I am very interested in the details and possible resolution), but I’d love to hear all about the whipped cream cake.  That cake always catches my attention, but I"ve not yet had occasion to make it.  Do you love it?

Anne, I loved the whipped cream cake. By all means try it.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 02:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  41
Joined  2009-10-09
Julie - 07 July 2010 11:29 AM

hds, is the cake dipping in the middle (middle meaning halfway between the outer edge and inner tube, not the part closest to the center tube) or is it cooling flat (or domed) in the middle?

Butter cakes do tend to shrink some after you take them out of the oven (if they shrink while still in the oven they are overbaking), and you mention that the texture is fine, so I wonder if this is what you’re seeing?

If the cake really is falling by dipping in the middle, then it could be underbaking (oven too cool or not long enough baking time) or undermixing. As you mention it could also be too much leavening, are your measuring spoons accurate? You didn’t accidentally substitute baking soda for powder, did you?

Thanks for your response

The cake domes slightly, something akin to what pound cakes do.  In fact the other cakes from the book that I’ve baked in a fluted pan also tend to dome and sometimes crack slightly.  The finished cake is 2 and 3/4 inches tall.  The pan measures four inches from the counter to the rim measured on the outside of the pan.  (Measuring height from the inside of a curved fluted pan is beyond me)

The cake does not dip in the middle.  (Believe me, I’ve had that experience.)  It cooled flat, pulled from the sides, but just seemed a lot lower than it should have been.  It definitely did not retain the domed height

  I’m positive the baking time isn’t the issue because sometimes I’ve baked these cakes close to the maximum time and measured the temperature per the book’s instruction with an instant read thermometer.  It might be the oven is too cool.  The recipe gives a 350 vs. 375 for dark pans temperature.  I used the 350 but on second look at the pan, its fairly dark.

I"m using the same measuring spoons I’ve used for ages and had no problems with.

My best guess is that its undermixing especially since it doesn’t occur every time .

The cake’s texture is good if a tad bit dense.  The more I think about it, the more I think its a combination of undermixing and an oven slightly too cool.

But would love to here any suggestions.

Thanks much

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1420
Joined  2007-11-15

I think Julie has hit the answers.  and in my experience, the whipped cream cake will shrink considerably if left in the oven too long.  it does shrink during cooling, too.

 Signature 

http://myyellowkitchen.com/index-equipment-html/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 03:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  44
Joined  2010-06-12

I made the whipped cream cake for the first time last night. It’s fabulous. I can’t even get over it. And it’s ridiculously easy to make. I can’t recommend it enough.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 04:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2010-04-25

Thanks Patrick & Knit1Bake1 for your thoughts on this very “magnetic” cake—I swear, this cake drives me crazy, and I will make it as soon as I can squeeze it in!!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 04:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4783
Joined  2008-04-16

hds, what was the internal temp when you took it?  Peaking and cracking could be normal (as for a pound cake), or could mean an overbaked/overmixed cake.  Most butter cakes should reach 205F within the time indicated. 

On the other hand, if “poor volume, compact structure” sounds like it could be your problem, then the table on p. 8 of RHC suggests that the problem is old or too little baking powder, or cold butter or eggs.  Were your ingredients too cold?

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Cultured Butter Recipe

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 04:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2010-04-25

Most butter cakes should reach 205F within the time indicated.

Apologies for momentary hijacking—

Julie, is this a temp I can use fairly reliably in addition to the spring back and toothpick test for butter cakes in 9” rounds, bundts, little loafs, etc? 

I was wondering, because the small pistachio cake I made for hub and self sunk…..in the middle….all the way down…ALL THE WAY DOWN LIKE A VORTEX.  Of course, it was on the top rack, etc., and the ‘real’ cakes didn’t, but I was wondering if I could use my thermomenter as a back-up, as I’m usually baking “side cakes” along with the “real” ones.

Many thanks!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 09:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4783
Joined  2008-04-16

Anne, I think so.  Sponge type cakes, including chiffon, often do better (at least at my house/oven) with a lower finished temperature, but most classic butter cakes seem to do well just over 200F.  I take the internal temp along with monitoring the other signs, and note down the temp that seems right whenever I bake something, and the consensus (in my kitchen) seems to be about 205F or maybe a little less.

 Signature 

B&T Blog:  Cultured Butter Recipe

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 10:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  610
Joined  2010-06-07
Anne in NC - 07 July 2010 11:44 AM

I can’t answer your dipping question (although I am very interested in the details and possible resolution), but I’d love to hear all about the whipped cream cake.  That cake always catches my attention, but I"ve not yet had occasion to make it.  Do you love it?

That cake always catches my attention too. Whipped cream and ice cream are my two weaknesses. i cannot be left alone with either of them

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2010 11:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2010-04-25

Whipped cream and ice cream are my two weaknesses. i cannot be left alone with either of them

Watch out, Missy!  If it’s up to Silke, soon you will also be addicted to beautiful, hand-made serving platters!!!

consensus (in my kitchen) seems to be about 205F or maybe a little less

Julie—thanks so much.  I am going to definately start doing this as well, aiming for 205 to begin with!  Very much appreciated!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 July 2010 06:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  610
Joined  2010-06-07
Anne in NC - 08 July 2010 02:02 AM

Whipped cream and ice cream are my two weaknesses. i cannot be left alone with either of them

Watch out, Missy!  If it’s up to Silke, soon you will also be addicted to beautiful, hand-made serving platters!!!

 

Hand made serving platters gulp  where????

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 July 2010 11:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2010-04-25

Missy,

Here’s a quote from Silke in this topic:

These are my two favorite ceramics shops:
http://www.etsy.com/shop/artsielady
http://www.etsy.com/shop/atelierBB

I love Etsy because you buy directly from the artists, and it?s not made in China and mainly enriching wholesellers, retailers, and other people with sticky fingers?


Some really pretty stuff there!!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 July 2010 11:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3149
Joined  2010-04-25

If the cake really is falling by dipping in the middle, then it could be underbaking (oven too cool or not long enough baking time) or undermixing.

Julie,

I baked an “extra” little pistachio cake, and it sunk all the way down in the middle. Not a problem, as it was for the hub and self, and is still delicious.  It could be that it was on the top rack or something.  But I’d love to get your thoughts on a mixing question.  I (A) usually make more than the amount of batter called for—usually for 3 layers total, so 3x a single layer recipe or 1.5x a double-layer recipe—and (B) only have a hand-held mixer.  To compensate, I (A) always mix about 25% longer than called for and (B) always mix on a speed higher than called for.  Unfortunately, I destroy the symmetry by adding that I also (C) will usually add my eggs in a sort of “half 4” rather than 2 additions (since it is more egg mixture than a single batch).  I’ll add 1/4 egg mixgture and mix just to get it going, then add another 1/4 and mix for the 20 seconds, then add 1/4 and mix to get it going and then the last 1/4 for 20 seconds.  Does that sound like good practice to you or could it be a bad idea on other grounds?

Thanks so much for your (and anyone else’s) thoughts!

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 2
1
Back to top