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Looking for Rose’s new lemon curd instructions!
Posted: 04 March 2008 06:30 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi!  Rose recently posted a process change in making her lemon curd recipe:  She listed a slight change in the order she added the ingredients.  I saw this somewhere on the site, and now I can’t find it—and, wouldn’t you know, I have to make some lemon curd tomorrow!  Can anyone help me out?

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Posted: 04 March 2008 06:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hane - could this be the thread you were thinking of?

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2008/01/as_orange_as_it_gets.html

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Posted: 04 March 2008 06:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks, Patrincia—that’s EXACTLY what I was looking for!  I especially appreciate the part about storing lemon curd in pressurized jars—a great idea, as it would be convenient for me to make a lot at once and store it for later.

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Posted: 07 March 2008 12:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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(Sorry for the double post)  I just made a quadruple batch of lemon curd using Rose’s new directions (mixing the butter into the egg yolks and sugar before adding the lemon juice), and it came out MAGNIFICENT!  My new candy/frying thermometer (registers 100 F-400 F) was a big help, too; as Rose mentioned in the Cake Bible, the curd reached its perfect thickness at 196 F.

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Posted: 07 March 2008 01:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Mmmm - thanks for posting!  Please tell us what you plan to do with all that lemon curd?

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Posted: 07 March 2008 03:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I used most of it for a large party cake:  some for the filling between layers, and some for the lemon mousseline buttercream.  This is the same combo I used for my daughter’s wedding cake in June 2005, and people are still raving about it.

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Posted: 07 March 2008 05:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Sounds wonderful—please post pictures if you have them!

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Posted: 11 April 2008 03:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Hane, I hope your party cake is/went well with the lemon curd.

I just got an order for a wedding cake with lemon curd filling and posted this question under cake questions here, but saw your post about your cakes.

I am wondering if it is okay to leave the cake out for longer time (wedding) with the lemon curd as a filling.  Did you have any trouble with this?  I was going to use the White Velvet butter cake, so it needs to be room temp when served.  Did you run into any problems with this?

I appreciate any thoughts.

Thanks!

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Posted: 12 April 2008 06:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Hi, Cathy!  I made my daughter’s wedding cake with lemon curd, lemon mousseline buttercream, and a cake similar to White Velvet butter cake.  It all held up just fine for the 24+ hours in which it was at room temperature (assembly time, delivery time, the wedding day).  Keep in mind that the egg yolks in the curd are thoroughly cooked in the process, and the curd contains a lot of acid (lemon juice), so danger of contamination is pretty low.  I’ve been having great luck with making lemon curd since I bought the new thermometer and use Rose’s 196 F. rule.

My wonderful son-in-law’s 30th birthday party is coming up soon, and he’s asked for the same kind of cake for his big day.  I’ll try to remember to take a pic of it to post here!

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Posted: 18 April 2008 01:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Hane,

I just saw your reply and somehow had missed it.  Thank you for the assurance! 

I have trouble getting the curd to 196 degrees for some reason.  I use a nonreactive pot with a glass bowl over—double boiling method.  I’ve been concerned that I will boil the curd, so don’t put the stove on high.  But I do get it close to high.  Do you do anything different?  I keep it on for some time, but it never seems to get to that high of a temp.  I use my good thermometer.

Any advice is welcome….

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Posted: 18 April 2008 01:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I made a double batch of orange curd recently. I had trouble measuring the temperature correctly—it was much higher closer to the bottom of the pan, lower towards the top. I found a hint on the Cooks’ Illustrated site that really helped me. The curd turned out just right.
They suggested you pull a heat-proof spatula through the curd, scraping the bottom of the pan. If the curd flows back together immediately, it’s not done yet. If the spatula leaves a clear trail across the bottom of the pan that then quickly fills in, the curd is “just right.” If the spatula leaves a clear trail that fills in very slowly, it is overcooked and too thick.

Here’s a link, but you will need to be a paid member of their Web site to view it.
http://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipe.asp?recipeids=2266

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Posted: 19 April 2008 01:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Cathy, I think that your problem may be in the use of a double boiler, which would prevent the curd from attaining the proper heat.  I put my saucepan over direct heat, clamp the thermometer to the side of the pan, and stir constantly with a heat-proof spatula.  In The Cake Bible, Rose mentions that manufacturers of lemon curd often bring the mixture to a boil, then immediately run it through a strainer to remove any coagulated bits of egg.

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Posted: 19 April 2008 02:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Agreed… I make it over a direct heat too.  Be sure to use a good quality, heavy bottomed saucepan.

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Posted: 19 April 2008 07:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Oh, good suggestion, Hane! Yes, I also use a heavy-bottomed saucepan over direct heat.

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Posted: 19 April 2008 09:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Thanks everyone.  I’ve been using the double-boiler method b/c I was having such trouble obtaining a metallic taste to my curd.  Even with a stainless steel saucepan or non-stick, which everyone here referred me to in another post.  I have finally been able to make it w/o the metallic taste now.  But have been planning on investing in VISION saucepan just for this purpose.  I will do this b/f this wedding in which I will be making a lot of lemon curd.

On that subject….have you had any trouble with doubling/tripling the curd recipe?

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Posted: 19 April 2008 11:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I had no problem doubling the orange curd recipe. I did use a really big Pyrex measuring cup to boil down the orange juice in the microwave. For lemon curd you don’t need to reduce the juice, so no problem. In fact, I found it easier to make a double recipe than a single one!

By the way, I decided to mix the butter in with the egg yolks and sugar as per Rose’s suggestion. I hadn’t left the butter out quite long enough to be really soft, so here’s what I did:

Put sugar and zest in food processor and whiz until zest is processed very fine. Add egg yolks, pulse to mix. Add semi-soft butter in chunks, pulse to mix. Add reduced orange juice and whiz briefly to mix. Dump it all into saucepan and proceed.

Be sure to weigh your egg yolks, they seem to be varying in size a whole lot these days.

Have fun!

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