White Cake- For Rainbow Layers
Posted: 14 September 2010 08:47 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello Everyone…this weekend I will be making a few things for my niece/god daughter’s birthday party.  My sister in law requested a rainbow layer cake.  It has four layers, (red, yellow, blue and green) with a white icing in between and the icing on the outside needs to be a little stiff to make it cloud like.  I am pretty sure I need a clean white base cake to make the colors come out correctly.  Does anyone have any suggestions?  I also would love a suggestion of what to do for the icing…that would accompany the cake flavor well.  Thanks…I appreciate your help!

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Posted: 14 September 2010 10:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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My sense is that the white velvet would work.  It has butter, so the cake is slightly off-white, but the advantage in flavor and wholesomeness over shortening is huge.  The yellow, red and green will be pretty easy, but the blue may take on a turquoise or aqua hue if you are using pale pastels.  Paste colors and bright hues might be a good idea. 

Here’s an interesting rainbow cake, Rose featured it on her blog a while back:  http://amerrierworld.com/2009/06/22/rainbow-cake-and-unicorns/

As for the frosting, you could use Italian meringue with vanilla or lemon juice in it for a pure white fluffy cloud effect.  Or for a less sweet, slightly ivory fluffy frosting, use gelatin-stabilized whipped cream. 

If you decide a buttercream is in order, the vanilla mousseline in RHC- Miette’s Tomboy- has a larger proportion of meringue and will give you the palest color of the all-butter buttercreams.  Also, for the palest color in a buttercream, be sure to whip the butter well before making the bc, so that it is as pale and light as possible.  The advantage of a buttercream is that it will keep so well at room temp and is a dream to pipe, if you are going to pipe anything.  The whipped cream will have a limited time at room temp (long enough to bring the cake to room temp, but overnight it would need to be refrigerated), and the Italian meringue will get sticky and doesn’t have a lot of flavor (full disclosure, I’m not an egg-white person). 

Good luck, I hope you’ll post a pic, it sounds like such a dreamy cake for a little girl!

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Posted: 14 September 2010 10:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Is this cake white or yellow in color?

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Posted: 14 September 2010 10:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Julie - 14 September 2010 01:21 PM

My sense is that the white velvet would work.  It has butter, so the cake is slightly off-white, but the advantage in flavor and wholesomeness over shortening is huge.  The yellow, red and green will be pretty easy, but the blue may take on a turquoise or aqua hue if you are using pale pastels.  Paste colors and bright hues might be a good idea. 

Here’s an interesting rainbow cake, Rose featured it on her blog a while back:  http://amerrierworld.com/2009/06/22/rainbow-cake-and-unicorns/

As for the frosting, you could use Italian meringue with vanilla or lemon juice in it for a pure white fluffy cloud effect.  Or for a less sweet, slightly ivory fluffy frosting, use gelatin-stabilized whipped cream. 

If you decide a buttercream is in order, the vanilla mousseline in RHC- Miette’s Tomboy- has a larger proportion of meringue and will give you the palest color of the all-butter buttercreams.  Also, for the palest color in a buttercream, be sure to whip the butter well before making the bc, so that it is as pale and light as possible.  The advantage of a buttercream is that it will keep so well at room temp and is a dream to pipe, if you are going to pipe anything.  The whipped cream will have a limited time at room temp (long enough to bring the cake to room temp, but overnight it would need to be refrigerated), and the Italian meringue will get sticky and doesn’t have a lot of flavor (full disclosure, I’m not an egg-white person). 

Good luck, I hope you’ll post a pic, it sounds like such a dreamy cake for a little girl!

I have seen that rainbow cake before yes, that is what I suggested when she asked for rainbow…but the cake is rainbow in its layers with the white icing separating it.  It is actually a very tall cake with pinwheels on the outer for decoration.  She found the cake in Sandra Lee- Semi Homemade…i just can’t bring myself to make cake out of a Pillsbury box…

Thank you for the buttercream suggestions.  I will most likely use a buttercream and may try the Miette’s Tomboy…I will see if I can locate clear vanilla extract.

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Posted: 14 September 2010 10:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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If you have RHC, there’s a good picture of the color of this cake on p. 90, the chocolate-covered strawberry cake. 

Here’s picture from Marie’s blog:  http://heavenlycakeplace.blogspot.com/2010/06/chocolate-covered-strawberry-cake.html

The cake is made with egg whites- no yolks- so it is definitely not a yellow cake.  But it does have butter, which gives it an off-white, or ivory hue.

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Posted: 14 September 2010 11:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Julie - 14 September 2010 01:41 PM

If you have RHC, there’s a good picture of the color of this cake on p. 90, the chocolate-covered strawberry cake. 

Here’s picture from Marie’s blog:  http://heavenlycakeplace.blogspot.com/2010/06/chocolate-covered-strawberry-cake.html

The cake is made with egg whites- no yolks- so it is definitely not a yellow cake.  But it does have butter, which gives it an off-white, or ivory hue.

Great…yes…I have both books, I got RHC for Christmas and then decided I needed TCB.  I Think I will definitely go with this cake.  I am going to use food coloring gel as suggested in the recipe for the cakes so I am sure I can get the blue to darken.  Thank you.

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Posted: 14 September 2010 03:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Ok…so I have the Pinwheel cake recipe that my sister in law is asking me to make and a photo…

They are calling for 48 oz of a classic white pillsbury frosting with an additional 1/2 cup confectioners sugar.  What can I do that is some what equivalent to this?

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Posted: 14 September 2010 06:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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schnacks143 - 14 September 2010 06:46 PM

They are calling for 48 oz of a classic white pillsbury frosting with an additional 1/2 cup confectioners sugar

Yikes!  Just the thought of all that canned frosting makes me shudder.  It’s a cute cake, and it’s commendable that you’re trying to give them something more wholesome!

If you can live with an off-white, my first choice would be the Miette’s tomboy version of vanilla mousseline.  Otherwise, a whiter and fluffier option would be Italian meringue.  Even though it’s sweeter and less flavorful than mousseline, I would still prefer it to a super-sweet, shortening-based confectioner’s sugar frosting.

If your food colorings are large in quantity, be sure to deduct them from the liquid in the recipe, as scratch cakes don’t have the tolerance for adding things that a mix does.

I’ve never used a seven-minute frosting, but I think it’s similar to Italian meringue, you could look at that, too.

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Posted: 15 September 2010 08:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Yes…all of that frosting…it makes me ill.  Especially when I read the ingredients on the can…

Maybe what I can do is a combination of the mousseline in the middle and use the Italian meringue on the outer.  This way it will have some flavor, but the white fluffy exterior will be present. 

I am planning on using the gel food colorings.  How do you think this will work with the batter?  Should I still cut a little of the milk?  The red and yellow call for the entire tube (that bothers me as well- cake just shouldn’t be this way)...and the blue and green are both half of the tubes.

Thanks for all of your help!  Your suggestions are appreciated.

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Posted: 15 September 2010 10:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Wow, I have zero experience adding food color to cake batter.  The gel will be liquid plus some sort of gelling agent, probably a starch of some sort.  If I had to guess, I would say that the gelling agent cancels out some, but not all of the liquid.  So, if it were me, I would probably do something like sub 1T of the gel for half or two-thirds of a T of milk.

Perhaps someone else will chime in?

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Posted: 16 September 2010 08:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Julie - 14 September 2010 09:56 PM
schnacks143 - 14 September 2010 06:46 PM

They are calling for 48 oz of a classic white pillsbury frosting with an additional 1/2 cup confectioners sugar

Yikes!  Just the thought of all that canned frosting makes me shudder.  It’s a cute cake, and it’s commendable that you’re trying to give them something more wholesome!

If you can live with an off-white, my first choice would be the Miette’s tomboy version of vanilla mousseline.  Otherwise, a whiter and fluffier option would be Italian meringue.  Even though it’s sweeter and less flavorful than mousseline, I would still prefer it to a super-sweet, shortening-based confectioner’s sugar frosting.

If your food colorings are large in quantity, be sure to deduct them from the liquid in the recipe, as scratch cakes don’t have the tolerance for adding things that a mix does.

I’ve never used a seven-minute frosting, but I think it’s similar to Italian meringue, you could look at that, too.

Is the Italian Meringue you are talking about the one that is listed as part of the Silk Meringue Buttercream?  How does this frosting fair?

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Posted: 23 September 2010 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Thank you for all of your help…attached are a few photos…

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Posted: 23 September 2010 10:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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It did!  The cake was delicious, but the Vanilla Mousseline did not have enough flavor for me. 

One question I do have about the Mousseline (which seemed to come out fine) is when you add the heated sugar mixture is the egg supposed to become a marshmallow consistency?

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Posted: 23 September 2010 11:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Your rainbow cake looks perfect!  The Elmos are adorable, too!  Great job, were the kids and mom thrilled?  The vanilla mousseline looks perfect, too, when I saw the photo the first thing I thought was that you used the meringue, so it looks quite pale.

Did you end up subbing the gel food color for some of the milk, or just adding it? 

When I make vanilla mousseline, I add more extract than Rose does, about 1 tsp per cup of buttercream if pairing it with chocolate, a little less with non-chocolate.

When you add the hot sugar syrup to the whites, they expand quite a bit and become more firm and sticky, especially as they cool.  I guess that’s sort of marshmallow-y. 

Now that I’m back on this thread, I see that I missed a question earlier- yes, the Italian meringue is just the egg white portion of the recipe.  There’s a stand-alone recipe for it in the Cake Bible section on meringues, p.298.  In RHC, the lemon meringue cake is an example of a cake frosted with Italian meringue.

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