Too stretchy/rubbery brioche dough that is difficult to roll
Posted: 03 October 2010 01:15 AM   [ Ignore ]
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hi guys!

i have been recently tried baking breads…the bread family is something new to me and actually isnt really my cup of tea. Although i dont have the bread bible as well(havent found the book here where i live)...i still did try it. smile

I tried baking this kind of bread called brioche dough for the first time and it did turned out well on the first time but there is something that really has me thinking regarding this…i dont know if what i am doing is correct or not….But why is it that after i have made my dough and left it in the fridge overnight to proof, in the morning as i roll it…its too stretchy that when i try to roll it using my rolling pin…its like its rubbery and i cant seem to roll it as desired…it keeps on stretching and coming back!

Is there something wrong with it? Do you think it lacks something or maybe i over kneaded it or under kneaded it? or maybe something about the proofing period? or maybe it was cold coming from the ref? i really dont have any idea here.  Well..i did make it using my stand mixer using my dough hook attachment and i did follow the recipe to the T. I am just not sure why it comes out like that?

I did saw a video of someone making it and when he rolled it using his rolling pin…it was easily rolled much like a pizza dough! how come mine takes a ton of force to roll? and when i roll it…it comes back?

Hope u can advice me smile

PS: i did try it again today and it did came again like that….the other half i stored in the freezer cause i cant continue with it unless i find out first what went wrong. I want to take up this challenge and i hope i can do it right the next time! hope u can help me! smile

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Posted: 03 October 2010 05:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I love to make brioche, it’s a wonderful dough- soft and silky.

The snapping back you describe is from the development of gluten.  What kind of flour did you use?  And what kind of flour did the recipe call for?

I highly recommend Rose’s brioche, it is in all of her “bibles”, Cake, Pie/Pastry, and Bread.

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Posted: 04 October 2010 12:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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the recipe uses half of bread flour and all purpose flour.

But is the “tagging” sensation really present in a brioche dough? i was thinking(from the video i saw) that the consistency of the dough would be much like a pizza dough when rolled, taking its shape readily as u roll it. In this case of mine…the dough after taking out of the fridge and punching, was very tough to stretch…its like its fighting and having “tag of war” with me! hehehehe! when i place it on my surface and try to roll it…it would take a ton of force for me to roll it and make it rectangular in shape and as i do it..it retracts back to a ball.

PS: is that so? awww…i only have her latest book “Roses heavenly cakes”...too bad for me…:(

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Posted: 04 October 2010 01:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Rose’s brioche is in Rose’s Heavenly Cakes, p.346, I recommend it.  The last time I rolled brioche there was a little bit of the springing back, but not much.  It certainly didn’t resemble a tug of war!

If you want to proceed with your current recipe instead, either choose flours with lower protein content or work (knead) the dough less, or both.  For an extensible (rolls more easily) bread flour, I like using Gold Medal’s Better for Bread.  King Arthur flours generally have higher gluten contents than other national brands like gold medal or pillsbury, so if you are using KA unbleached AP, you might want to skip the bread flour.

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