Crosspost plus some from blog:  Question about bundt pan vs. angel food pan vs. tube pan
Posted: 05 October 2010 11:33 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi Rose!

I am such a HUGE fan of your books. I think I have them all! Sometimes the recipe’s fascinate me, and I want to try them. Other times I just look at the pictures in awe and just know that I could not do them. I bought a scale simply because one of your earlier books said that baking needed to be very precise and that a scale would provide that. I use it all of the time!

If you don’t mind, I do have a question. I make this cream cheese pound cake recipe that I got from a web site that calls for the standard amounts of sugar, butter, cream cheese, eggs, vanilla, and almond extracts. When I have beaten it in my KA mixer, the batter is very fluffy and very thick, which is how I imagine it should be. I put it in my pan having to turn the pan around with one hand, literally spreading it around the pan with a spatula so that I can get all of the batter in there.

I have an angel food pan that I cook it in, and even though I bake it as directed for 1 hour and 15 minutes at 325 degrees F, it is NEVER done at the center. It is always wet there; however, it appears to be perfectly done around the edges and maybe about 1/2 way towards the center. Then I have to bake it for 10 to 15 minutes more for the center to get done. Of course, this causes the outside to be quite dry by the time the center is done.

I also have an 11-cup stoneware bundt pan from Pampered Chef, and that one takes even longer to cook all the way through. So my question is this, what kind of pan should I be using and where in the world do I find it? The stoneware pan holds 11 cups of batter according to Pampered Chef. I have no idea how much the angel food pan holds. It does have a removable center tube insert with it.

I have put an oven thermometer in my oven to determine correct temperature, and it is exactly what the oven is set for every single time. I am truly perplexed, and I would really appreciate it if you could shed some light on this issue. I love this pound cake! The texture, the taste, everything about it totally rocks on the day it is baked; however, on the 2nd day not so much because it is so dry. Where did my moisture from the day before go? I don’t make it as often because of this issue. I like to eat pound cake without anything on it if it is baked correctly, and if this one happens to come out moist on a lark I just love it. Thank you for your help!

I am including the actual recipe that I use from Allrecipes.com so that you can see what the cake is made from. Here is the link to it:  http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Cream-Cheese-Pound-Cake-I/Detail.aspx

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups butter
1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese
3 cups white sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
6 eggs
3 cups cake flour

Directions
Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Grease one 10 inch tube pan.
Cream together the butter, cream cheese, and sugar until light. Stir in the vanilla and the almond extracts. Add the flour and the eggs alternately, beginning and ending with the flour. Pour batter into the prepared pan.
Bake at 325 degrees F (165 degrees C) for 1 hour and 15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.


Linda in NC

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Posted: 05 October 2010 09:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I would use the pan that they specify in the recipe- a ten inch bundt pan. An angel food pan is different and the stoneware pans don’t work well just as Hector said in the blog. Martha Stewart has a very similar recipe and she uses two loaf pans.
Good Luck

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Posted: 06 October 2010 11:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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jan - 06 October 2010 12:45 AM

I would use the pan that they specify in the recipe- a ten inch bundt pan. An angel food pan is different and the stoneware pans don’t work well just as Hector said in the blog. Martha Stewart has a very similar recipe and she uses two loaf pans.
Good Luck

Thank you for your reply. I appreciate Hector’s advice along with yours. My issue is when I Google a 10-inch bundt pan image, several of them come up, and most of them look like my angel food pan. I truly am missing what the difference is between all of them. I do get why one would not want to use the stoneware pan because as Hector said it does retain heat for a very long time after it is removed from the oven. When I tried that recipe in that pan, the cake was so dry it was not good at all. I was not a happy camper that day.

This is really confusing me. I can bake a cheesecake like nobody’s business. They come out perfect every single time.. I can make normal from scratch cakes very good as well. This recipe with a bundt pan is really stumping me. I cannot figure out why it isn’t getting done in the center close to the tube to save me.

Thanks again for your replies. If you happen to have any images of what a 10-inch tube pan should look like or even where I can get one, I would appreciate the feedback.

Linda

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Posted: 08 October 2010 10:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I posted a bit about this on the blog.  I’m with Linda on the pan issue.  The recipe calls for a 10” tube pan, not a bundt pan.  An angel food cake pan is a tube pan.  Hector said an angel food cake pan is wider, but that would lead to overcooking, not undercooking.  If the pan has a dark exterior (which most angel food cake pans do not) then that could promote overcooking at the edges. 

As I said in my blog post, you can try cooking at a lower temperature.  On the blog you didn’t say what temperature you cooked at, so I didn’t know if you were at 375 or what.  Going lower than 325 is unusual, but it seems like the only likely solution other than switching pans.  (I’ve been experimenting with cooking brownies at 300 to keep them moist.)  I doubt that switching to a similar type pan such as a bundt pan or a pair of loaf pans is likely to make a difference, as these are basically equivalent.  The only other thing that comes to mind is to switch pans to something intentionally different to alter how it cooks.  So for example you could make half a recipe in the same size pan and see if the center cooks faster as a result of being thinner.  Or try a 9x13.  (Of course it might cook in only 30 minutes, so check early.) 

One thing to keep in mind is that your expectations may not match the recipe author’s expectations.  The recipe author may like dry pound cake.  (Most pound cake is on the dry side, in my experience.)  In find that most people are happy to eat any home made cake that has some sugar in it.  Even people who bake a little often aren’t very discerning.  I take failed baking projects to pot lucks all the time and get rave reviews anyway.  Most recipes are not written with particular attention to the exact type of pan or the exact quantities of ingredients.  The author wrote “3 cups cake flour”.  Since there’s no weight, that’s vague.  It could be anywhere from 10 oz to 14 oz of flour.  Maybe even more.  (I don’t use cake flour much, but I know that a scoop of all purpose can weigh 6 oz, even though Rose says only 5 oz on her conversion charts.)  How much flour have you been using? 

This recipe has a strange mixing method, in which you add the eggs alternately with the flour.  I don’t believe I’ve ever seen that before.  Anybody have any idea why you’d want to do that?

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