Help! Sheet cake for 100 servings
Posted: 24 October 2010 10:55 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi all!

I am new to this website, but I have browsed here before and have found everyone so helpful that I just had to join!
I don’t consider myself a pro, but I do love to bake!
I am about to try my hand at a larger cake than I have ever done.  The request is that it be one square cake decorated to look like a wrapped gift (in white & pink) and then a sheet cake that will stay in the kitchen to be cut and served from there. I will need to have enough for approx 200-220 servings.
I was thinking a 14 inch square will produce approx 100 slices? Is this correct or should I go ahead and make the 16 inch square?

And as far as the sheet cake…...I am guessing that the easiest is to bake two thin cakes and stack them? My question is how thin should the thin layers be?

I understand that 1/4 sheet is 9x13 (which is the only size rectangle pan that I own). I am wondering if I should try to use these, or just go out and buy a 12x18 pan?
If I use the 9x13 I imagine I will need to bake at least 4 thin layer cakes to stack and then put side by side to get close to 12x18…..but is this size enough for 100 servings or will I need more?

Oh boy! sorry for all the questions~ I am a bit nervous…any help is greatly appreciated!
BK

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Posted: 24 October 2010 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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BK, Hi and welcome!  Sorry, I don’t have much experience with large orders, but just wanted to say that sheet cakes in general look better taller than shorter, so you may want to keep those layers a good thickness.

As far as the servings, one method is to decide on the size of cake (i.e., a 2x2 square 3” tall) slice that you’d like to give each person and go from there.  Hopefully the cake gurus with large order expertise will be by soon. smile

Good luck!

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Posted: 24 October 2010 08:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi!  I have just been going through the same drill for a large cake I need to deliver on Nov 7th.  Last night I was folding a 12” x 18” parchment paper to see what potential slices I could get.  I am planning to make two regular sized 12"x18” sheets, stacked on top with butter cream in middle and ganache on outside.  This should be approximately 4” tall when all put together.  I think the most manageable (in terms of slicing directions) with a generous portion size (since the only other dessert will be some fresh fruit) is 4 rows of 18 slices that will each measure 1"wide x 3"deep x 4"high.  That would produce 72 slices   (the Cake Bible p. 490 says 80 slices for 2 layers of this size, but that is for a standard wedding cake slice which runs a bit smaller.)  Since I need at least 100 slices, I’m planning to stack a 9"x13” rectangle on top, a la the Incas. 

I recommend you get the 12 x 18 pan.  Even if you don’t end up doing a ton of large cakes, you can also use it to make a quick two-layered 9” x 13”.  Just slice the sheet in half length wise and stack.  It also gives you possibilities when needing to do large funky shapes for groom cakes and the like.  You will, however, also need a sufficiently large cooling rack.

In terms of recipe size, I have had good results using the Yellow Butter Cake recipe for two 12-inch by 2-inch layers (Cake Bible p. 484) for my one 12x18 rectangle.  I’m going to try the chocolate butter cake (p. 487) for this next one.  Check out the master chart on p. 490 and you’ll see they have similar Rose Factors so it works.  The cooking times are flipped for the Level 6 cakes (just learned that on this site the other day!) so your cooking time should be 40-50 minutes.  My last one needed 40 minutes. 

Be sure to use parchment with baking spray when preparing the pan, and you can still use bake-even strips by pinning together two smaller ones.  Rose suggests a longer rest period on the wire rack for larger layers (20 minutes), so be sure to adjust that as well.  With butter cakes, they are easier to handle when assembling if you chill them in the fridge or freezer…this seems particularly helpful when trying to maneuver such large layers.  Instead of a cake pan bottom, I usually use a cardboard cake base to help move the layers. 

Hope this helps!

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Posted: 24 October 2010 09:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thanks for the input!
I realize the main source of information on this site is the “cake bible”......ummm I am in Mexico and therefore can’t just run to the nearest store and pick up a copy. Can I get a downloadable copy?

I was planning on using chocolate box cake….so if I get the 12x18 pan how many boxes?

Ok thanks again!

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Posted: 24 October 2010 10:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I see that the newest cookbook—Rose’s Heavenly Cakes—is available on Kindle through Amazon.  It is a beautiful book.  You might also check the library.  In the meantime, try two cake mixes per single sheet. About the only thing I still make with a cake mix is my grandmother’s rum cake, which adds vanilla pudding mix and rum to a yellow cake mix (Frangelico is a nice variation, too.)  Since making my first butter cakes out of the Cake Bible about 18 years ago, I haven’t used a cake mix since for anything else.  They are really that good!!! So at some point try to snag a copy and give it a try smile

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Posted: 07 April 2016 04:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’m going to try the chocolate butter cake (p. 487) for this next one.  Check out the master chart on p. 490 and you’ll see they have similar Rose Factors so it works.????


gosakto

 

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Posted: 07 April 2016 11:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Let us know

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So many recipes - so little time.

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