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Crusting Buttercream
Posted: 27 March 2008 02:11 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello,

I am trying to discover how to make a crusting buttercream. I have seen that you can do a fondant looking smooth buttercream using the paper towel technique. but to do this I need a crusting buttercream.

Now all the recipes I have found use Shortening. I am from Australia and this is not somthing we use or redilly availabe. I can find it in my cake supply shop, but I also think this would not be particulary healthy option. so any tips or recipes would be fantastic

I am just not a great fan of fondant covered cakes and preffer the use of buttercream. but I want to make the finish product super smooth.

In rose’s cake bible she mentioned that most cakes with this finish are either fondant or royal icing set then sanded. I was wondering since this book was published if there have been improvements in this department.

I have just been assigned to create my brothers engagement and wedding cakes and I want to use a smooth buttercrem finish.

Thank you all for your time its greatly appreciated

Brett
xxoo

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Posted: 27 March 2008 09:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi VelvetDream - I think it’s safe to say most of the regulars on this particular blog are devotees to Rose’s butter/cooked sugar syrup/meringue based buttercreams and much prefer their flavor and texture to the ones called “crusting” buttercreams (powdered sugar/shortening).  Did you know you can get a wonderfully smooth finished coat with Rose’s buttercreams?  You can find a lot of helpful suggestions if you do a search on the blog (click on Rose’s blog above).

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Posted: 27 March 2008 05:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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i’ve used the mousseline buttercream often and found that it crusts with refrigeration… that is, if i’m thinking what you’re thinking when you say “crust”...

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Posted: 27 March 2008 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hi again.  The mousseline should get firm upon refrigeration, but it shouldn’t crust (stay dry and “crusty” on the surface at room temperature).

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Posted: 27 March 2008 09:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Velvet Dream
The “crusting” thing happens because the recipes that crust have meringue powder in them to stabilize the icing and alas, crust or “dry”.  They are made with shortening or a combo of butter and shortening with icing sugar and meringue.  THey are never “cooked”.  Rose’s buttercreams are totally different.  Personally [and as Patrincia points out]  the contributors of this blog do not use a “crusting” buttercream.  Rose has a MULTITUDE of buttercream recipes that are far superior.  You CAN get a better [smooth] finish and a more stabilized end product with her buttercreams.  You will be using a spatula / cake blade [or whatever you want to call it] versus using the the paper towel technique you describe with crusting buttercream.  The flavor and texture of Rose’s buttercream is incomparable to the “crusting” types.  Rose’s are very sophisticated.  Do be patient and practice.  Once you get the hang of working with the butercream we use here, you will NEVER go back.  There is lots of good advice here.  Try going to “mousseline, the magic buttercream” thread and enter a search for buttercream in the search box [top right].  Patrincia and Hector are the “go to” people here in this forum for their tips and expertise.  Get you hands on The Cake Bible and read read read!!  Have fun!  Valerie.

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Posted: 27 March 2008 09:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I was just going to post on this.  I’ve just had the joy to enjoy the “most wonderful” couture cupcakes from a local bakery that is so well known today as the cupcake place to be.  My dearest friend Kathy picked up the flavors of the day:  red velvet with cream cheese frosting, chocolate with vanilla frosting, chocolate with coffee frosting, and vanilla with plain frosting.

All frostings are called “buttercreams made with real butter and the freshest ingredients.”  In my opinion ALL WERE CRUSTED and DID not taste a bit like butter.  And let me tell you, I know what butter tastes like in buttercreams because it is indeed a flavor and texture that I am so sensitive about and often complaint if it is too buttery!

Needless to say, the chocolate cake was peach black, and did not taste like chocolate.  The establishment advertises as cakes made daily from scratch.  I don’t know if there are any government regulations for this term “scratch” in cake-keries.

I was so disappointed, and shared with Kathy the Mousseline which never crusts.

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Posted: 27 March 2008 09:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I am with you Hector.  I am afraid I am becoming a bit of a “buttercream snob”.  My back bristles when I hear of ANY icing with a slippery mouth feel being referred to a a “buttercream”.  Here in Canada there is a totally artificial product called “butr-cream” [clever spelling eh?].  It sits in a pail, needs no chilling ...ever.  Never gets rancid and ices very smooth.  Did I mention it tastes like a chemical plant smells?  My mission in life is to spread the word about GOOD buttercream.  Calling the other stuff “buttercream” is like calling mushrooms “truffles”.

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Posted: 27 March 2008 10:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Hey Valerie, I hope I interpreted the shape of your wonderful country, Canada, correctly!!!!!!!!  on my Rose’s World Cake.  Believe it or not, it was the people coming from the smallest countries in the world that made sure it was present on this cake, not that I needed more work done!

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Posted: 27 March 2008 11:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Oh thanks so much guys that has really helped. I am going to give the Mousseline buttercream a go. I also saw a demonstration yesterday doing a swiss meringue buttercream thats looked wonderfull. I am very intriged to taste the difference of the sugar syrup method verses the confectioners sugar version. I feel i am about to become addicted to somthing very wonderfull.

Thanks again for you help . this blog is just wonderfull.

xxoo

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I can’t wait to hear what you think…. I’m constantly told how much better my buttercreams (aka Rose’s buttercreams) are than the gritty, sugary stuff people have been told is “decorator buttercream” for years.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 04:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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BTW, Rose’s Mousseline Buttercream is near 20 years old if not longer!!!!!!!!!!!  But you can’t buy it for $20 a bucket, so thus bakeries use the “cost-efficient” stuff!

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Posted: 28 March 2008 11:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Speaking of non-crusting buttercreams…

The latest edition of Cook’s Illustrated has an interesting recipe for a quick chocolate frosting that replaces a portion of the powdered sugar with corn syrup (I have also successfully made this with Lyles golden syrup). The result is a glossy, smooth, just fluffy enough buttercream that doesn’t crust.

And..get this..you can whip it up in a food processor in about a minute—no joke.

I’ve made this a few times, making the original chocolate version, and my own version of a vanilla buttercream. I am quite happy with both versions, and I’ve taken to using them on my cakes and cupcakes at Capital Tea (because the health department gets a bit cantankerous when I use egg based buttercreams on baked goods that are not refrigerated).

Has anyone tried this technique yet?

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Roxanne, I’d love to try it!  Would you be willing to post a recipe?  I want to make sure I get the proportions right.

I do love Rose’s buttercream recipes, but sometimes don’t have the time to make them if a cake request comes up on the spur of the moment.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 04:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Roxanne, thanks for sharing.  Yes, lot of questions on how food-safe legal is the Mousseline buttercream.  I haven’t gotten anyone get sick, and I do believe a few commercial bakeries out there do use it.  The chocolate version is great, and also Rose’s Chocolate Ganache which is has no eggs and the cream if cooked!

I am not a big fan of corn syrup, it can be unhealthy, and there is enough we eat of it since it is used just about on EVERYTHING you buy to eat.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 09:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I worry too about the safety of egg based buttercreams.  I tend to use Rose’s mousseline because the whites are cooked to a higher temperature than in the neoclassic buttercream [where I am not sure the yolks are getting cooked enough].  However, I love the flavour of the Neoclassic more.  The Mousseline can sit out for 2 days!! WOW How is that possible? 

Has anyone out there used pasturized egg whites? [from the carton, in the dairy section of the grocery store]
Is it possible to use powdered egg whites, reconstituted to merinque?  It makes me sweat to think about people possibly getting sick from my product.

In my home or at a small function, I can control or predict how long the client will leave the cake out.  BUT, at a wedding?  Somethings are beyond my control. Yolk or cream based fillings are an invitation to a bacteria party are they not?  Although I am drawn to the flavour of them, I avoid them and end up feeling like I am missing out on a whole chapter on mousses and custards.  Chilling a cake with these fillings is great, only if it’s NOT a butter cake.  Logistics, logistics.

I recall a posting here somewhere, that reflects the Egg Board official stand on the subject of egg safety.  As a newbie, I can’t seen to navigate to it at the moment. But, there must be experiences out there we can share - beyond heeding the Egg Board official line. Let’s learn from each other and make sure that none of our creations cause a tummy ache.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 09:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I worry too about the safety of egg based buttercreams.  I tend to use Rose’s mousseline because the whites are cooked to a higher temperature than in the neoclassic buttercream where I am not sure the yolks are getting cooked enough.  However, I love the flavour of the neoclassic more.  The Mousseline can sit out for 2 days!! WOW How is that possible? 

Has anyone out there used pasturized egg whites? [from the carton, in the dairy section of the grocery store]
Is it possible to use powdered egg whites, reconstituted to merinque?  It makes me sweat to think about people possibly getting sick from my product.

In my home or at a small function, I can control or predict how long the client will leave the cake out.  BUT, at a wedding?  Somethings are beyond my control. Yolk or cream based fillings are an invitation to a bacteria party are they not?  Although I am drawn to the flavour of them, I avoid them and end up feeling like I am missing out on a whole chapter on mousses and custards.  Chilling a cake with these fillings is great, only if it’s NOT a butter cake.  Logistics, logistics.

I recall a posting here somewhere, that reflects the Egg Board official stand on the subject of egg safety.  As a newbie, I can’t seen to navigate to it at the moment. But, there must be experiences out there we can share - beyond heeding the Egg Board official line. Let’s learn from each other and make sure that none of our creations cause a tummy ache.

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