Rose’s apricot filling versus lekvar
Posted: 27 March 2008 10:45 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Has anyone tried the apricot filling on page 335 of the Cake Bible? 

Rose also refers to something called “apricot Lekvar” on page 429.  Lekvar, she states is to be purchased.  Has anyone tried using this?

I am making a wedding cake and the client requests apricot filling.  I will be making the downy yellow butter cake, 4 ” tiers.  Each tier will have 4 layers.  In between the layers will be apricot.  I am guessing it will need a firmish filling as not to ooze out from the layers.  That is as far as I have gotten with the ideas.  I have done one wedding cake before so my experience is limited to ... one.

My concern is that if I use an apricot filling that is not thick enough it may just sink into the cake [=one big soggy mess].  On the other hand, if it is too stiff, it may tear the top of the layers and be a pain to spread.  I can’t combine BC and apricot as the client specifically wants the ribbon of apricot and a “hit” of apricot flavour.  I think I am looking for something that would, for instance, be rolled into a jelly roll or swiss rolls as we call them in Canada [yes, we call them “SWISS” rolls in Canada, go figure]

Any ideas would be appreciated.  I was thinking of making Rose’s apricot filling and trying to thicken it [gelatin, pection, conrstarch??].  I am wanting to stay away from purchased “jam”  because, I want cake and FILLING, not cake and JAM.  Unless, there is a really good “jam” out there.  Please help, I’m in a bit of a ....

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Posted: 28 March 2008 12:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I am no expert but after reading roses book. could you not do an apricot buttercream??? the Swiss or the wonderfull mussaline i hear about???

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi Valerie - I agree with you about staying away from using jam as your filling.  I haven’t made the apricot filling, but knowing the quality of Rose’s recipes, I’m sure it’s fabulous! 

As for the fear of the filling “sinking” into your cake—you can put a very thin protective layer of buttercream on the layer before you spread your filling on (like some people butter bread before they add mayo). 

As for the filling squishing out of the layers—I would pipe a buttercream “dam” around the circumference of each layer and chill before adding the filling.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 03:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Patrincia’s technical hints are excellent, and indeed you find this in well known cake decorating books.

Rose has the recipe for Apricot Lekvar on The Pie and Pastry Bible.  It is described as thicker than preserves.  I haven’t tried myself, but it reads fantastic.  It used premium California sulfured apricots.

What I have done just last week is Dried Apricot Cordon Rose Conserve.  I used the ratio of the Cordon Rose Conserve, but cutting the sugar in half (since apricots are much sweeter than raspberries), and by replacing by weight the raspberries with apricots soaked in water overnight (weight of the re-hidrated apricots).  Also, the cooking time was extended to 8 minutes per batch of Apricots.  I’ve run this thru my KA strainer several times and canned.  The results were “like picking the fruit from the tree.” 

It turned out very thick so I need to dilute it in hot water before I can use it as a fruit glaze, but I can’t wait to try it mixed on Mousseline.

I didn’t quite undertand about yoru client wanting ribbons of apricots.  You can use apricot Mousseline, and in addition swirl more apricot preserves?

Patrincia, Costco carries those wonderful dried apricots, go grab a bag and make some Lekvar!  The Mango Passion Tart has a thin coat of apricot preserves (or Lekvar) on the tart shell, and the same as glaze on the mangoes.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 09:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Great advice!  Thanks

Hector-what I mean by “ribbon of apricot” is a distinct layer of apricot.  When the cake is plated, you would see a thin layer of apricot. 

Patrincia-your idea of “buttering” the layer first with buttercream is perfect.  The apricots from Costco are the ones I get too [for snacking].  SO fresh and soft.  I will go to the Pie and Pastry BIble for the apricot lekvar.  Great idea.

Hector- In your picture beside each post you have a cake/tart made of what looks like swirled jelly roll.  Very nice.  What is it comprised of?  You work is so unique. 

Velvet dream- I tried doing exactly what you suggest [combining apricot and buttercream]  I loved it but my client wanted a distinct apricot layer. 

In a previous post, somewhere else I spoke about the client thinking buttercream is ‘too buttery”.  With advice from this forum, the problem is fixed.  THANKS.  I added white chocolate and as Hector suggested, liquor.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 09:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Valerie, I would make apricot Mousseline, spread it on, then with a piping bag draw circles or lines with pure apricot lekvar.  When you cut, you will see a wonderful apricot colored frosting with dots of pure apricot.  I think it will be apricot plenty.

My picture is the Mango Passion Tart, but I omitted the mango and the thin layer of sponge cake, by replacing it with charlotte spirals filled with passion curd (basically speaking: slices of jelly roll).  It is titled Passion Tart for Charlotte.

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Posted: 02 April 2008 11:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Here are some recipes for making your own home-made apricot lekvar. Haven’t tried them myself.

http://homepage.interaccess.com/~june4/lekvar.html

http://www.recipezaar.com/54692

If you want it thicker you could always add a bit of gelatin or pectin, but it sounds like mostly you just have to cook it down enough so that it is very thick.

Let us know how your cake works out…I’m sure it will be delicious, no matter what you do!

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Posted: 25 April 2008 06:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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For a stand-alone apricot filling, rather than an ingredient, I really like a Julia Child recipe. It’s in ‘Julia Child and Company’, p.11. in case you have it. If not, it’s given as a layer in a dacquoise and it goes like this:

Ingredients:
1 lb dried apricots (I use California. I don’t think Turkish apricots were readily available in 1978)
1 cup dry white French Vermouth
2 cups water
1 stick cinnamon
zest of one orange
2Tb apricot liqueur, or 1Tb Cognac or rum

Soak the apricots in the water and Vermouth in a sauce pan several hours or overnight until tender. Then simmer with the cinnamon and the zest for 10 minutes or more until very tender. Drain thoroughly and puree in a food processor or vegetable mill. Boil down the cooking liquid, if any, to a thick syrup. Add it and the liqueur to the puree. Keeps up to 1 week refrigerared. Makes about 2.5 cups.

Somehow the orange, cinnamon, and Vermouth don’t show up as extra flavors. They just round out and intensify the apricot. The flavor when paired with buttercream is one of those “whole is more than the sum of its parts” experiences, like apples and cheddar, or pineapple and coconut.

Anyway, the cake will be great. Apricot, one way or another will be a sparkling accent.

Cathy

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