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My first real wedding looking cake
Posted: 27 March 2008 11:34 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi All,

I made this cake a few weeks back for a friends 30th birthday. It was Red velvet With a Very delicate orange buttercream. the flowers were david Austin Roses they smelled just divine.

What do you think??

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Posted: 28 March 2008 01:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I LOVE it!  I know orange buttercream is perhaps the favorite flavor on buttercreams.

And let me tell you something important:  the way you left the frosting rough like painter’s plaster makes your cake so much more delicious than if totally plastic smooth… this finish compliments the beautiful natural element of your English David Austin’s!

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Posted: 28 March 2008 01:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi, VelvetDream!  I love the look of a simple stacked tier application with fresh flowers.  Your roses are lovely—they look like the peonies I grow!

One little suggestion from my own experience:  I learned that my cakes looked more professional once I got the hang of making my buttercream a nice, smooth layer.  For the buttercream recipes in The Cake Bible, I apply the buttercream with a Wilton’s frosting bag and tip (it’s a bag about 15” long, with a humongous metal tip that’s about 2” wide).  Then, after I smoothe the frosting with a metal spatula, I dip the spatula in boiling water, quickly dry it with a paper towel, and then gently glide the spatula over the surface of the frosting.  The heat of the spatula melts the buttercream a TINY bit, and you get a nice, smooth surface.  This technique is called “hot-knifing.”

If you use a confectioner’s-sugar buttercream instead, you can hot-knife it without drying off the hot spatula.  Another technique calls for applying the buttercream, and then letting it “stiffen” on the cake for an hour or so, until the surface is a little dry.  Then lay a non-shredding paper towel over the buttercream and run a dry spatula over it.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 01:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I really like the rustic quality of the buttercream combined with the lovely elegance of the blooms - very nicely done! (and love that you mixed up the colors a bit).

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I think I caught cake-smoothing paranoia from the decorating school I attended.  smile  Even though I agonize over cake-smoothing, my cakes do still look rather “rustic” compared to other people’s, so decorative squiggles have become my best friend.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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We cake decorators are much too hard on ourselves.
downer

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Posted: 28 March 2008 10:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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It’s beautiful!  I love the dots that surround the layers. They are so precise… it looks like a string of pearls.  Do you have to put anything down before you put real flowers on a cake?

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Posted: 28 March 2008 11:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Not always—some kinds of fresh flowers are actually edible.  For my latest wedding cake, though, I was nervous that sap from the rose stems would get into the cake, so I put the roses on the lower tiers into “flower sinkers”—little plastic vials with spiked bottoms—which I stuck into the cake.  I bought them at my local cake decorating supply store.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 01:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Hane - what are the “flower sinkers” called?  I can’t find them on the site.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Love your cake especially the colour combination you used.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Oops—here they are!  Wilton calls them “flower spikes,” but my florist called them “flower sinkers.”  You can put a dab of wet florist’s clay into them to keep the flowers fresh.

Some florists stock clear plastic tubes that can be filled with water and closed with a rubber stopper with a slit in it, into which they insert the stems of delicate flowers like orchids, for corsages.  My florist didn’t have any, so he referred me to the cake decorating school and supply shop I mentioned above for the flower sinkers/spikes.

For one cake I made, the bride wanted a fresh flower topper that looked natural, like VelvetDream’s, and not mounted in a cup or vase.  Her sister-in-law cut out a disk of clear plastic from the top of a margarine container, taped some moistened floral clay to it, and inserted fresh flowers into it just before we set the cake up for the reception.  I wish I had a pic—it looked lovely!

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Years ago I made a cake with flowers arranged in a water-soaked floral sponge (oasis), placed on a plastic separator plate on the top tier…. the cake looked absolutely wonderful, but the floral foam slowly realeased some of its water over the hours the cake was on display, which meant it “leaked” onto the cake a bit due to the fact that the separator plate didn’t have sides to contain the leak.  So a word or caution to anyone who tries this method, make sure the oasis is in a container that will contain any puddles of water.

Also, it might be good to note the floral spikes available at floral shops are quite a bit larger than the floral spikes used in cakes, but I do like the fact that they have a rubber stopper.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Patricia, you’re absolutely right.  My friend was sparing in the amount of water she used (and we had no leakage), but a container with a lip would be a good idea, particularly if you’re in a humid climate.

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Posted: 28 March 2008 03:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Yeah… the directions on the oasis say to soak it until it is completely saturated, which they say will take a while, but what they don’t tell you is that it will also release water in that same slow fashion, so eventhough the oasis wasn’t dripping at all when I placed it on the cake, it eventually started leaking.   

Haha - its kind of funny looking back now.  And I’m happy to report Rose’s Mousseline is not only very heat/humidity resistant, but it’s also pretty water proof.
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Posted: 28 March 2008 04:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Using fresh flowers is great, and these questions on how to safely secure them and not damage the cake come up often.  I’ve learned in my Biology/Agronomy school, to use a wet/squeezed piece of cotton or tissue (kitchen paper towels are excellent, specially the super absorbent and thick ones), wrap it around the stems, and use a square of aluminum foil over.  It is much more streamlined than any floral tube, and it is readily available and biodegradable!  This is how we ship plant cuttings all over the world, some times the little bit of water is enough for about 1 week!

You can use green aluminum foil, and if it is the food safe type (like the ones used for cake boards), then it is safe to stick them on the cake.  You can use green florist tape if not touching the cake, works well for your floral designs that don’t have all flowers stuck on the cake but perhaps on stems, away from the cake surface, those dynamic airy designs, etc.  The green ‘cover up’ makes this water vessel almost invisible.

For stem extensions you can attach to toothpicks or chopsticks or skewers.

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Posted: 29 March 2008 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Hane - 28 March 2008 04:10 AM

Hi, VelvetDream!  I love the look of a simple stacked tier application with fresh flowers.  Your roses are lovely—they look like the peonies I grow!

One little suggestion from my own experience:  I learned that my cakes looked more professional once I got the hang of making my buttercream a nice, smooth layer.  For the buttercream recipes in The Cake Bible, I apply the buttercream with a Wilton’s frosting bag and tip (it’s a bag about 15” long, with a humongous metal tip that’s about 2” wide).  Then, after I smoothe the frosting with a metal spatula, I dip the spatula in boiling water, quickly dry it with a paper towel, and then gently glide the spatula over the surface of the frosting.  The heat of the spatula melts the buttercream a TINY bit, and you get a nice, smooth surface.  This technique is called “hot-knifing.”

If you use a confectioner’s-sugar buttercream instead, you can hot-knife it without drying off the hot spatula.  Another technique calls for applying the buttercream, and then letting it “stiffen” on the cake for an hour or so, until the surface is a little dry.  Then lay a non-shredding paper towel over the buttercream and run a dry spatula over it.

Oh that is fantastic advice thankyou. i will be trying teh smoothing technique this coming friday for my parents birthday cakea new orleans mud cake with raspberry Swiss meringue buttercream ( real butter cream this time not confectioners buttercream)

xxoo

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