Lining Pans - Waxed Paper vs. Parchment Paper
Posted: 03 January 2011 11:08 PM   [ Ignore ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3168
Joined  2010-04-25

I noticed that in TCB Rose mentions lining pans with waxed paper or parchment, so I tried using waxed paper.  I’ve found it works WAY better than parchment.  For one thing, it sucks right down onto the shortening and stays put.  Also, it doesn’t curl.  And, when you tap out the flour, it doesn’t fall out of the pan.  It releases the cake as well as parchment, and happily peels off the cake.

Is there any reason that parchment has gained preference for this task when waxed paper works so well, and, in my opinion, SO much better?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 01:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1360
Joined  2008-09-27
Anne in NC - 04 January 2011 03:08 AM

Is there any reason that parchment has gained preference for this task when waxed paper works so well, and, in my opinion, SO much better?


I use cut sheets of parchment, rather than the rolls, although I usually keep a roll on hand, just in case.  The cut sheets don’t curl and will stick quite well when put in a greased pan.  Also, I used the Baker’s Joy type products, so I don’t need to tap out flour prior to baking, so I don’t experience the problems that you do with parchment.

I’ve never used wax paper for baking, but I would suppose that the wax would melt off if exposed to the full oven temperature and the paper might burn or the wax get on the baked goods.  That won’t happen with the silicone in the parchment paper.

Edit:  I just threw a sheet of wax paper into a 350 oven to see what would happen.  Within a couple of minutes, smoke was pouring out of the oven and when I pulled the wax paper out, there were parallel lines of melted wax where the paper came in contact with the oven rack.

 Signature 

If error is corrected whenever it is recognized as such, the path of error is the path of truth.

—Hans Reichenbach

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 02:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  144
Joined  2010-05-24

I’ve had the experience of wax melting in the oven too, but all I have is waxed paper so I use it. I suppose a bit of wax gets into my food, but I don’t taste it. Where does one get parchment paper anyway? Safeway only sells wax paper.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 07:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4791
Joined  2008-04-16

Charles, awesome info, thanks for dirtying your oven! smile

michaelnrdx, I don’t have a safeway here, but most groceries plus Wal Mart sell parchment rolls.  Some places stock it with the plastic wrap, while others put it with the baking or cake decorating items.

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or Less) Sour

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 09:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3168
Joined  2010-04-25

Thanks, everyone, for your thoughts. 

I figure waxed paper was used before parchment became readily available, which is why it’s in TCB but not in RHC (I think).  I’ve had no burning or smoking problems with it, as I’m using it to line a cake tin, so the cake and pan shield it to whatever degree.  I haven’t noticed any flavor differential, and I paid particular attention for that.  At the same time, I wouldn’t use it for a cookie sheet or where it would receive more direct heat exposure.  Certainly wouldn’t use it on a rack to make something ‘en papillote’ or anything like that!  I’d think that most things cooked directly on the rack would smoke nastily—think grilling!

It’s cut my pan prep time WAY down, though.  I don’t like Baker’s Joy and the other sprays (I wish I did!), but that’s just a personal preference, so I’m stuck with shortening (TF free Spectrum), circle, shortening, flour and tapping!

Just thought I’d see if anyone knew if there was more to the switch than a product made more readily available to the population as a whole.  Obviously, parchment has more uses (papillote, cookie sheets, etc.), but I wasn’t sure if there was anything more to it, since waxed paper was formerly recommended for lining pans and its a bit easier to work with under certain circumstances.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 11:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2011-01-04

I have had excellent results using coffee filters. Food safe (abaca fiber), inexpensive and effective.
Regards,
Kathy M

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 11:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  33
Joined  2010-12-28
caitshin - 04 January 2011 03:36 PM

I have had excellent results using coffee filters. Food safe (abaca fiber), inexpensive and effective.
Regards,
Kathy M

I have never tried this, but it sounds like a good idea.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 11:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4791
Joined  2008-04-16

Rose uses coffee filters for lining pie shells for pre-baking and so do I, they work wonderfully.  I wonder if they’re non-stick enough for sponge-type cakes or other cakes that have a tendency to stick, anyone tried them for genoise or biscuit?

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or Less) Sour

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 12:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3168
Joined  2010-04-25

I have had excellent results using coffee filters.

Wow, Kathy! I’ll try this!  I have some old ones of this shape that I can use up!

Thanks!!!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 January 2011 03:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1088
Joined  2009-05-26

You can use coffee filters for par-baking? The paper doesn’t burn? I’ve been using parchment for this but coffee filter would be cheaper.

Anne, I also use wax paper sometimes. It works fine if it’s just for lining the bottom of pans that will be filled with cake batter. I don’t notice flavor difference also. I know wax paper would burn if it’s exposed directly to the oven but if it’s at the bottom of the cake pan it’s fine.

 Signature 

http://www.knittybaker.blogspot.com/

Profile
 
 
Posted: 10 January 2011 12:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4791
Joined  2008-04-16

I emailed the Reynolds company and received this reply:

“Thank you for your inquiry regarding Reynolds? Cut-Rite? Wax Paper.

Cut-Rite Wax Paper is manufactured with a triple coating of paraffin wax onto tissue paper. The wax melt point is 135 degrees F.

If wax paper is left exposed to the heat of a conventional oven, the wax paper may char and crumble. Therefore it should not be used for lining cookie sheets or other baking pans in which some of the wax paper is exposed. 

Cut-Rite Wax Paper may be used as a liner in baking cakes, quick breads, muffins, or any baked food in which the batter completely covers the wax paper.

Thank you for contacting us”

I take this to mean that any application where the paper is heated to 135F or higher will cause the paraffin to melt.  A separate issue is the burning of the paper at hotter oven temps.

 Signature 

Brød & Taylor Test Kitchen:  How to Make Sourdough More (or Less) Sour

Profile
 
 
   
  Back to top