Storing Frosted and decorated cake ! URGENT PLEASE HELP
Posted: 13 January 2011 02:58 AM   [ Ignore ]
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hey there so im gonna make the chocolate fudge cake with Chocolate pralin silk meringue BC and whipped ganache along with a crispy insert in the middle. And cover it with praline sheets.And im carrying it in my hand all the way to another continent just to deliver it to my sister. I just found out that i wont be able to meet her til 5 days after. Shes begging and pleading with me to freeze the cake when till she gets home… so thats 5 days… is that possible? Will the texture change? How long do u think i would have to thaw? Would the cake inside thaw as fast? Im so nervous about the very thought of it but i so badly want to bake this cake for her !!

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Posted: 13 January 2011 10:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Freezing the cake should be just fine!  I froze all of the cakes for my cousin’s wedding and used chocolate praline silk meringue BC—and all were wonderful.  The only question may be regarding the crispy insert, but the chocolate praline sheets freeze wonderfully too!  Generally, put the cake in the fridge and then once it’s thawed, bring to room temp. for serving.  Keep the cake wrapped (since you have no soft decorations) it should be ok until it warms up.

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Posted: 13 January 2011 11:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yes, completed, decorated buttercream/ ganache cakes freeze well.  Once it is frozen solid, be sure to wrap it well with plastic and foil.

I once froze a smaller cake, a roulade, then flew with it as a carry-on in a canister for protection.  For insulation, I wrapped it in a down coat (which I needed to bring anyway), and 12 hours later it was somewhat defrosted but cold and firm enough that the piped decoration still looked good.  Unwrap for coming to room temp so the wrap doesn’t mar the cake.  I brought a little plastic container of frozen frosting and a piping tip in case I needed to make repairs, but didn’t end up needing it.

Good luck, can’t wait to see the pics!

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Posted: 13 January 2011 11:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Yes, I freeze whole composed cakes all the time, with perfect results.  Let it get frozen and then wrap it well, as Julie says.

Let it thaw overnight in the fridge—However, if it’s heavily wrapped, unwrap it while frozen and put it on its serving platter or in a cake carrier, gently wrap it and put it in the fridge to thaw—you want to keep the air out, but you don’t want to have to take off complicated wrapping when it’s not frozen.

When you’re ready to remove from the fridge, unwrap it—but keep it covered—and give it a good 7 hours at room temp.  Sometimes it takes up to 9 if you want it to be really, truly, super-room temp soft.

Also, be careful of the praline sheets, since thin sheets of chocolate will be very fragile when frozen.

Can’t wait for pics!!!!! Good luck!  Your sister will be so pleased!!!

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Posted: 30 January 2011 01:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Anne in NC - 13 January 2011 03:17 PM

Let it thaw overnight in the fridge—However, if it’s heavily wrapped, unwrap it while frozen and put it on its serving platter or in a cake carrier, gently wrap it and put it in the fridge to thaw—you want to keep the air out, but you don’t want to have to take off complicated wrapping when it’s not frozen.

How do you gently wrap the cake for defrosting in the fridge? I assume that nothing should be touching the surface of the cake if it’s not to mar the frosting once it’s thawed. Would it be ok if I just take the cake out of the freezer, unwrapped it, and then put it in the fridge in a covered cake carrier?

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Posted: 30 January 2011 10:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hi, Michael!

First, yes!  As long as your cake is completely covered with buttercream or ganache, you can fridge it just in the cake carrier, as the frosting/ganache seals the cake and keeps it moist.  And I’d say, if you have a very fluffy frosting or really precise piping, this might be the way to go.

However, at the same time, buttercream and most ganaches are pretty solid in the fridge, so if you don’t apply pressure to them, they can handle plastic wrap.  The idea is to sort of protect the cake from the air in the cake carrier—although I’m not even sure if it’s really a problem.  However, I wrap anyway.

This is what I do: I put the cake on the cake carrier.  Then I take a piece of plastic wrap about 14” long and start it about 2” outside the cake carrier, along the floor of the carrier, up the cake, and let the rest lay on top (and some might do down the other side).  Then I do it again until the whole cake is covered.  The idea is to pretend the cake has sunburn, so you are draping it gently.  Then you can sort of pat teh whole thing so all the plastic wrap sticks to itself and the parts that hang off the carrier help to seal the air within the carrier from the cake.

Usually, it can be lifted off like a big hat before bringing the cake to room temp.

I’ve only done piping a couple of times—with neoclassic—and I’ve never had a decoration marred.  And for “regularly” frosted cakes, the surface wasn’t marred at all.

Good luck, whichever route you go .... and if this is with respect to an actual, rather than theoretical cake, post pics!!!

—ak

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Posted: 30 January 2011 04:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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That makes sense to get a little extra insurance by wrapping it lightly in the fridge. It’s air coming into contact with the cold surface of the cake that causes the water vapor to condense, so better to keep out as much air as possible. I’m in the process of planning a major cake for a friend who is going to study abroad in Costa Rica in March. I’m thinking of genoise classique, syruped with the fresh preserved pineapple syrup (using Costa Rican pineapples if they’re any good), filled and frosted with pineapple neoclassic, and decorated with fresh grated coconut on the sides. I just hope this isn’t too much for me, because I’ve never made buttercream before, and I’ve only made genoise twice (one classique, one golden—-and it’s been a while). I’m still figuring out the best way to do this. Maybe completing the cake in advance and freezing it, but I’m not sure yet. I probably will start a thread soon asking for advice. I will definitely take pictures!

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Posted: 30 January 2011 05:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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OMG, does that dound fffffaaaabbbbuuuullllloooouuuuussssss!!!

Let me tell you this:  If you can make a genoise—which scares the bejezus out of me—you can make buttercream. 

The neoclassic is super-easy, and there’s a video on the blog.  If you use the lyle’s instead of corn sryup, it’s be really yummy with the pineapple!

As for mousseline, it ain’t hard at all, and it’s sort of like this amazing sort of transformation when you see it all happen and come together.  This thread was really helpful for my first mousseline!  http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/2889/

As I understand it, mouseline is supposed to be especially delicious with fruit curds/butters in it, so maybe you can make a pineapple curd and mix it in!

I can’t believe how yummy your cake sounds.  If I promise to go to Costa Rica, will you make me one, too??

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Posted: 30 January 2011 10:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Lyle’s Golden Syrup with the pineapple buttercream sounds good. Golden syrup is honey-like, right? Have you used golden syrup in neoclassic before? Is it just a direct substitution? Works the same as corn syrup?

We’ll see how my ideas pan out. Maybe I will be able to make you one! wink

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Posted: 30 January 2011 11:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Lyle?s Golden Syrup with the pineapple buttercream sounds good. Golden syrup is honey-like, right? Have you used golden syrup in neoclassic before? Is it just a direct substitution? Works the same as corn syrup?

It’s honey-like in color, but more caramel, with a very slight molasses edge, in flavor.  Direct sub.  I’ve definitely used it in neoclassic—it’s called for in the Sicilian Pistachio Cake—with Lyle’s it’s called “Golden” Neoclassic Buttercream.

Watch you don’t get the squeeze bottle of Lyle’s though—especially if you used to squirt Hershey’s Syrup directly into your mouth as a kid!!  You might find yourself picking up old habits again!!

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Posted: 31 January 2011 03:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Michael, I think I remember that you’re from somewhere in the Bay Area.  If that’s the case, and you’re looking for Lyle’s golden syrup, they actually carry it at Cost Plus World Market.  It’s the only place I’ve seen it around here, but it’s pretty reasonable and in a 11.5 oz squeeze bottle.

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Posted: 31 January 2011 06:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Good memory, Loopy! My hometown is San Francisco, but I’m currently a student at UC Berkeley. I live close to Berkeley Bowl, and I think they might have it too. I’ll check this week. I definitely will need a whole month to get this cake together, with midterm season coming up and all. Genoise is not a short recipe, especially when making by hand!

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