light whipped ganache query URGENT.
Posted: 16 January 2011 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]
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So i made the Chocolate praline SMBC today and i have the light whippd ganache to tackle tomorrow.  Like i mentiond in a different post. Im mking the chocolate fudge cake with two layers of CPSMBC and a middle layer of a crispy feuillete layer. To make that adhere to the cake i had planned on makign the light whipped ganache. But after reading and re readin up this topic, im now confused. Since i have to freeze the assembled cake. keep it in transit for around 6 hours atleast after which it will again be refrozen til my dear sister can devour it ! =) So will the whipped ganache stay up to this sort of weight and temerature difference? will it weep water into the cake? or collapse? or should i just use some other ganache??

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Posted: 17 January 2011 10:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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When you take it out for transport, it should be frozen.  Ensure that it is in a well insulated container.  (if it’s in a box, surround the box with another box of styrofoam/blankets/etc.—it is amazing how long it takes a cake to thaw so you should be fine.  The whipped ganache shouldn’t water out—you may get a bit of condensation on the cake, but as long as it is wrapped and the humidity is low it shouldn’t be an issue (can always add some silica gel (in a container with a cover like paper towel/cloth attached with elastic) to help minimize condensation if the humidity is high).  Good luck—post pics of the YUMMY result!

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Posted: 17 January 2011 10:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yes to what Sherrie said.  The chocolate stabilizes the whipped cream so it won’t water out.  As long as you start frozen and keep it cool/insulated, the very middle of the cake shouldn’t warm up to the extent that it’s a problem.  Anything cream-based should be kept cool for long-term storage, but you can let it come to room temp for serving. 

Be sure that your cream comes to a boil when you make the ganache, to maximize shelf life, but that’s in the directions so you’ve probably already done it.

Good luck!

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Posted: 17 January 2011 01:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Sherrie!  Great idea re silica gel!

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Posted: 17 January 2011 04:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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thanks you guys. so so far i ve done the CPSMBC. i tried making chocolate fudge cake for the first time and it was horrid ! it tasted nice enough but for some strange reason the cake started crumbling apart it shrunk from the pan aroun 15 minutes after i took it out but it shrunk a great deal and it had the sides were way higher than the middle. and it just kinda started fallign apart from the sides. also it had craters in the middle ! i have no idea i weighed everything!! anyway i couldnt bear to try it and have it fail on me again since i dont know what i did wrong and i dont hve time ! So i went with chocolate passion cake. Its 12 here now and the cakes are cooling. The light whipped ganache mix is cooling in the fridge. i hope that whips up without any problems!! And i ve got my chocolate chopped up for the milk chocolate syrup =).  hey you guys im plannin on asseblign the whole thing tom morning. Any idea how long before i should take out the SMBC To let it thaw completely? iT s in the fridge now…

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Posted: 17 January 2011 04:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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You want to give the frosting PLENTY of time to come to room temp, or you’ll have the choice of (1) staring at it in desperation, waiting for it to be spreadable or (2) jumping the gun and having it separate on you!!  Actually, if it doesn’t seem to be coming to room temp as quickly as you need it, you can chop it into chunks like butter and it will room temp much faster.  Then you can put it all in a bowl and whip it (if you want) or just go ahead and use it.

If it’s cold in the fridge, I’d give it about 3 hours for every two cups of frosting, unless you have it spread really flat in a pan or something.

You can even put it on the counter last thing before you go to bed, and it will be ready for you in the morning.

Good luck!  Really sorry to hear about the Chocolate Fudge Cake.  RHC says that tunnels are from overmixing, but a coarse grain and sunken center is undermixing, so I can’t figure out that the deal could be.

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Posted: 17 January 2011 06:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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thanks anne ! i think i ll do just that. its 2 am now. and i ll proly be up and about by 8 so i guess thats enough time ! =) thankfully the whipped ganache finished up nice and im not puttin it in the fridge at all. =D

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Posted: 17 January 2011 11:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Good luck!  Can’t wait to hear about your cake, your trip and your happy reunion with your sister!

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Posted: 18 January 2011 11:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Just wanted to note that stored buttercream HAS to be beaten again before using it, or it will be too soft to work with.

Good luck!

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Posted: 18 January 2011 05:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Just wanted to note that stored buttercream HAS to be beaten again before using it, or it will be too soft to work with.

Julie,

I don’t mean to question this, because you know so much more than I do, but I’ve used neoclassic by just bringing it to room temp and frosting without rebeating, and it worked wonderfully.  It “felt” the same as the original, unfrozen batch.

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Posted: 19 January 2011 12:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Anne, question as much as you like, it’s good for me and I may learn something! smile  Plus, I get to be all nerdy.

Here’s my take on this:  Some batches of buttercreams seem to do well without the re-beating, and some definitely need it.  I’m not sure I’ve totally worked out when it needs it and when it doesn’t, but I think it’s related to additions.  If you have a lot of water (creme anglaise, fruit puree, etc) in the additions, they will turn spongy more quickly and then need re-beating. 

In my experience the silk meringue needs re-beating 100% of the time (and this is what Ninuh is using), while vanilla mousseline (with only extract as the addition), almost never needs rebeating.  I’ve only made white chocolate mousseline once, but it did need rebeating (maybe because I used cocoa butter and vanilla, so there was no lecithin like real chocolate?).

I made a batch of pineapple neoclassic buttercream but goofed on making the puree by straining it, so that the resulting puree was more watery than the recipe called for.  When I added the full cup that the recipe calls for, it broke.  I was able to fix it with a little rum (Rose says that alcohol helps the emulsion), but the buttercream turned spongy pretty quickly compared to others and needed re-beating several times while I was frosting and piping on the cake. 

Sponginess can be a problem if you take too long to smooth the frosting that is already on the cake.  If it has turned spongy, it will deflate and soften when you spread/smooth it and will look darker than the buttercream that hasn’t yet turned spongy.  Then you either have to refrigerate it and spread a new layer of frosting on top, or scrape it off, hope there aren’t too many crumbs in it, re-beat, and start over.

What kind of neoclassic didn’t need rebeating?

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Posted: 19 January 2011 02:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Thank you so much, Julie!  I love it when you get all nerdy!!

The buttercream I didn’t have to rebeat is golden neoclassic—both a “plain” version and one with pistachio butter mixed in.

Your answer was so helpful to understanding the various factors.  I know I would have been freaked out if I’d thawed one with liquid or a SMBC and it was thin—I wouldn’t have know what happened or what to do if it weren’t for this post!

Thanks again!!!

—ak

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Posted: 29 January 2011 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Do you think it is a good idea to freeze a cake frosted with pineapple buttercream? 

Julie - 19 January 2011 04:22 PM

Anne, question as much as you like, it’s good for me and I may learn something! smile  Plus, I get to be all nerdy.

Here’s my take on this:  Some batches of buttercreams seem to do well without the re-beating, and some definitely need it.  I’m not sure I’ve totally worked out when it needs it and when it doesn’t, but I think it’s related to additions.  If you have a lot of water (creme anglaise, fruit puree, etc) in the additions, they will turn spongy more quickly and then need re-beating. 

In my experience the silk meringue needs re-beating 100% of the time (and this is what Ninuh is using), while vanilla mousseline (with only extract as the addition), almost never needs rebeating.  I’ve only made white chocolate mousseline once, but it did need rebeating (maybe because I used cocoa butter and vanilla, so there was no lecithin like real chocolate?).

I made a batch of pineapple neoclassic buttercream but goofed on making the puree by straining it, so that the resulting puree was more watery than the recipe called for.  When I added the full cup that the recipe calls for, it broke.  I was able to fix it with a little rum (Rose says that alcohol helps the emulsion), but the buttercream turned spongy pretty quickly compared to others and needed re-beating several times while I was frosting and piping on the cake. 

Sponginess can be a problem if you take too long to smooth the frosting that is already on the cake.  If it has turned spongy, it will deflate and soften when you spread/smooth it and will look darker than the buttercream that hasn’t yet turned spongy.  Then you either have to refrigerate it and spread a new layer of frosting on top, or scrape it off, hope there aren’t too many crumbs in it, re-beat, and start over.

What kind of neoclassic didn’t need rebeating?

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Posted: 30 January 2011 09:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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If the buttercream is Rose’s pineapple neoclassic and the cake is fully frosted and decorated before you freeze it, I don’t see any problem.  Freeze until hard, then wrap airtight in several layers of plastic, then foil.  You can start defrosting with the cake still wrapped in the fridge overnight if you like, but be sure to unwrap it for coming to room temp so the frosting isn’t marred by the wrappings.

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