Frozen pie on heated baking stone?
Posted: 28 January 2011 06:58 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m hoping someone can help me. I have a frozen cherry pie (Rose’s recipe) in pyrex pie dish. I’m planning to bake it off tomorrow for my brother’s birthday “cake.” Question: Can if put a pie, frozen in a pyrex pie pan, directly on to a heated baking stone. Tomorrow is almost here, and I’m afraid to move. Thank you from a worried baker.

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Posted: 30 January 2011 09:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I normally dip a pyrex that’s been in the freezer in warm tap water for a minute or so before putting it in the oven.  You might also, if you’re worried, start it on the rack, then move it to the stone.

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Posted: 31 January 2011 07:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thank you for answering.  Here is what I did. I took the rock-hard frozen pie out of the freezer and put it in the refrigerator overnight. (It was tightly sealed in a plastic bag.) I preheated the oven to 425, didn’t use a baking stone, but moved the rack to the lowest position. I baked the pie for twenty minutes, turned down the oven to 350 and covered the edges with a pie edge protector. When the pie started to bubble, I cranked the heat up to 400, covered the whole thing loosely with foil, and baked until golden. The bottom turned out nice and brown, and I truly thought it was the best pie I ever made. I’m keeping my eye out for old pyrex at yard sales. My pie plate is probably 20 years old. It might have survived on a baking stone, but I couldn’t risk it on this occasion.

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Posted: 01 February 2011 04:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I place a wire rack (no legs) on the quarry tile that I keep on the bottom shelf of my oven just before I place the pie on the tiles, no broken glass pie pans, yet.

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Posted: 01 February 2011 05:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Doesn’t the juice from the pie make a mess on the baking stone? Or do you use parchment?

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Posted: 01 February 2011 05:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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If I anticipate a problem with overflowing juice, I use a cheap pizza pan sitting directly on the quarry tile instead of the wire rack.  A baking stone or quarry tile is one of those things that I don’t worry about; if it gets a little juice or fat on it, so what.

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Posted: 16 May 2012 10:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I have a Pampered Chef, flat pizza stone which I love. I called her this morning about an item which I ordered from her and asked about putting a frozen solid pie in a pie tin onto a heated stone. She said that it I did that it would break the stone at some point. Because like glass, unless it’s heatproof I guess, it will eventually shatter.

The pizza stone goes into the oven cold along with the pizza.

But I like Julie’s idea of putting the pie on the rack 1st and then moving it to the stone. That way both the pie and the stone are heated. And then I wouldn’t think that the pizza stone would break.

As for the juice, I had some overflow onto my stone. But once I took the pie off the stone after it baked on it for the 1st 20 minutes at like 475 degrees, I sat the stone in the double-metal stainless steel sink to cool off somewhat, and then just scaped it off with a metal spatula while I moved the pie back into the oven at a lower temperature of 365/375 degrees.

My cherry pie came out wonderful! Not runny, and certainly not as sickenly sweet as canned filling. This was the best cherry pie I’ve made to date.

I used Dole’s Dark Sweet Pitted Cherries, (frozen & thawed & drained, 3 twelve ounce bags) and then used the normal spices of cinnamon, sugar, dotted with a little bit of butter and of course the cornstarch. It was very good! I even used the minature polymer clay Premo cutters, (brand new cutters; don’t ever used clay cutters which have been used on clay), to cut out pieces of dough for a decorative top pie crust. They turned out nice. I started just overlapping, starting at the edge and going in concentric circles.

And I made this pie, unbaked and froze it. And popped it directly into the oven to bake on my preheated pizza stone. But as my Pampered Chef lady reminded me, be warned, you should never put anything cold on the hot pizza stone, including a glass pie, otherwise you will have shattered a glass pie plate and eventually the pizza stone as well.

It was good that she reminded me. I forgot!  red face  So I will definitely try Julie’s suggestion. Thank you very much Julie!

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