Cleaning a sifter
Posted: 12 March 2011 06:51 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi everyone!
  Crazy question - I have been baking cakes now and I have a problem cleaning my sifter - does anyone have an easy way to clean the metal sifters?  I have tried the dishwasher and very hot water - yet it is still tough to clean…I feel like I am missing a very simple concept of cleaning wink
Thanks!

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Posted: 13 March 2011 09:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Thanks…

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Posted: 19 March 2011 01:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I find a sifter quite unnecessary. They take up a lot of space (I have an urban kitchen) & I noticed the cleaning issues with the one my mom uses. I do one of 2 things: use a wire whisk, or put the dry ingredients in the mixer & use its whisk (a food processor will do the same job as well). If you use a wire strainer for pasta, those can work nicely too.

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Posted: 21 July 2011 01:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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There are two schools of thought here from what I’ve seen in pro kitchens, in person and on TV:

1. Don’t wash your sifter. Instead, give it a good shake and put it away. If you can keep it from getting wet or coming into contact with anything but flour this makes pretty good sense and is probably the most popular choice.

2. Get a top-grade stainless steel sifter, shake and hand wash (cold water keeps any flour from getting pasty and tough to remove), spraying with a high-pressure hose if you have one. I’ve often seen pastry chefs put their sifter in the oven on 300 degress or so to cook lumps of flour they can’t easily remove before washing.

And then there are those that’ll tell you to just get a sieve (often confused with a sifter), which is a lot easier to clean and potentially space saving, since it’s multi-use.

@CharlesT: thanks for the stainless steel chemistry lesson - I had no idea the brown stuff that prompts me to toss out expensive stainless steel equipment is not actually rust and completely removable.

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I’m a man of two insatiable appetites: fresh, brick oven baked Italian bread and eggs (or breakfast pizza!) in the morning and making beats

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Posted: 30 January 2013 05:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Here is a few tips. First don’t put it in hot water, use luke-warm,  soapy water to loosen the hardened flour bits. Make sure you let it soak a while. Then to keep it from rusting towel dry it the best you can and put it in your oven on very low temp. Say about 275 or lower and allow it to dry for 5 -10 minutes. The next time just shake it thoroughly and try to get all the flower out but do not let it get wet or put it area where there may be moisture ( like above your sink) or even above or near the stove where there is steam.

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Posted: 30 January 2013 05:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Oh and I just bought a new pull apart sifter so that the top screen separates from the bottom and you can screw the flour catcher or container underneath the sifter. Awesome idea and easier to clean

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