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“Steam Buttercream” or “Steam Cream” - heard of it?
Posted: 03 May 2008 04:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I’m curious about the caution about not using a buttercream that has eggs or cream. We have a lot of options in terms of how to make buttercream - there’s meringue buttercreams (Italian Meringue or Swiss Meringue), French or Classic buttercreams (with corn syrup or sugar, and eggs - either yolks, or some combination of whole eggs and yolks) and then there’s a lot of variations of what most bakers call “simple buttercream” or “American buttercream” which can have milk, butter, salt, vanilla, and either butter or vegetable shortening. 

What kind of buttercream does Loveliana make or use for this?  If you were going to do it (melted/steamed buttercream) how would you make the buttercream?

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Posted: 04 May 2008 04:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Speaking of solving mysteries, Jeanne, I’ve been meaning to thank you for clearing one up for me! I made a successful wedding cake back in 2004 loosely based on Rose’s art deco design in TCB. That is, I used her flourless chocolate cake, the choc oblivion truffle torte with rolled fondant but not the art deco design. She writes that after tiering, the completed cake can be served the same day or refrigerated for an additional 2 days. I think I only refrigerated it overnight, but anyway it worked like a charm.

Last year, when I proposed doing the same cake at baking school (again with different design elements), my instructor looked at me like I had lost my marbles. He insisted that it wouldn’t work, that fondant should NEVER go in the fridge, but he let me go ahead. It almost didn’t work. The fondant began to sweat like anything, and I was terrified that the piped royal icing decorations would slide off the cake before it was served. Maybe they did, and the bride and groom were too sweet to tell us later.

I was mystified! In hindsight, the fact that different fridges can have different humidity levels is the obvious answer. But it didn’t occur to me then or since. That is, until I read your comment. Our walk-in cooler at school would naturally be more humid than a home fridge, especially with all the produce etc. for the “hot side” of the kitchen. Duh! smile So thank you very much. I’ve been afraid ever since to put fondant on that particular cake, which really does need to be refrigerated. And it’s such a wonderful taste/texture combination.

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Posted: 04 May 2008 04:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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my walkin is very humid as well; if I need to refrigerate a fondant covered cake for any reason, I put it in a large sheet pan bag and tie it. I use a masonite board under the cardboard the cake is sitting on so it doesn’t flex at all and it works great for the smaller tiers.  It doesn’t work (the bag is too small) for anything bigger than a 13” round or 12” square.  What I do when it gets busy is to put the bigger tiers in boxes and wrap the box in plastic. 

It helps a little and works better if it is overnight rather than longer. Different brands of fondant behave differently in these conditions so what you’re used to with one brand may be better or worse with another.

I did a cake for a bakery intern who worked at a large, well known place in CA and she told me that they use (new) garbage bags to cover the entire tiered cake. It’s the only way they can do that many fondant cakes in a weekend.

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Posted: 19 October 2008 09:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Hi everyone,

I was googling and came across this webiste and read about the steamed buttercream.  I am a Malaysian but have been in the States ( Boston) for the last eight years.  I see that Sharifaz had translated it well.

Below is the recipe and the method how to go about doing it.

Recipe for the Buttercream:
125 gm   butter (not too soft and not too hard)
125 gm   krimwell (can be substituted with crisco)
100 ml   golden syrup (amount is adjustable according to your desire, but not more than 100ml, otherwise mixture will become too watery)

Start with beating the krimwell/crisco for 10 to 20 minutes, then add in butter and syrup and continue beating for another 10 to 15 minutes until texture is appropriate to cover a cake and pipe designs.

You may add in your favorite flavor such as vanilla essence, mint essence, strawberry essence etc…to avoid the buttery taste.

Method:
Prior to adding the buttercream below, make sure that you have a cake ready in the refrigerator

  1. Heat the beaten buttercream on low heat for about 3 minutes - make sure that the buttercream does not melt.
  2. Take the refrigerated cake out
  3. Pour the heated buttercream onto the refrigerated cake.  Swirl the cake around so that the buttercream falls nicely all over the cake.
  4. Leave the cake for about 5 minutes so that the buttercream will solidify (crusted).
  5. The cake is now ready to decorate
  6. This method eliminates the time for you to iced the cake and thus shortens the time to prepare the cake for decorating.  The cook iced cake with this method makes the cake
    smoother.

I have tried this method before and it turned out pretty well smile

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Posted: 03 March 2009 10:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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hi alls..

i am ellyssa from malaysia as well.. a friend of mine did try this method.. and she said… the method will make the cake become so smooth.. yet we have to make sure do not over heat while boiling the krimwell n butter. else it will make ur buttercream became oily..smile

http://drezqi.blogspot.com

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