Pre-baking and Freezing—Better to fill and coat with buttercream before?  Or freeze layers plain and decorate after defrosting?
Posted: 08 May 2011 10:05 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I’d like to get each tier of my traveling wedding cake filled and frosted before freezing; what are the downsides of this?  Would it be better to freeze the layers plain?  This is so much fun!  My second post!

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Posted: 08 May 2011 12:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hi, Katey!!

Of course it may depend on your cake, as some fillings will freeze better than others, but when I bake—butter cakes and butter cream frosting (neoclassic, silk meringue buttercream, mousseline, ‘American’ buttercream, ganache, cream chese frosting)—I fully compose and freeze the entire cake.

Hope that helps!

—ak

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Posted: 08 May 2011 01:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi, ak, Thanks for the reassuring advice.  Compose and freeze it it will be!  I rely heavily on TCB’s buttercreams, especially the mousseline and silk meringues.  I’ll use syrup, too in the cake (golden dream wedding cake batter).  The great advice available here really boosts my confidence.

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Posted: 19 September 2011 08:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Anne - do you just do this for a day or so… or have you filled and freeze for more than a week out?  I have done this for a day or so with good results… but I’m wondering how the buttercream will hold up/taste if frozen between the layers and as a crumb coat ... do you (or anyone) see an issue with this holding up in the freezer for a couple-few weeks?

(I have 12 cakes to make total for this wedding, you can see why I’m getting a head start!)

Thank you,

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Posted: 19 September 2011 11:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I’ve frozen an entire composed cake for 7 weeks, and it’s been perfect!  I wouldn’t hesitate to freeze for several months if worked out more conveniently for me to bake a particular cake that far ahead of time.  I would feel perfectly comfortable starting now, even for a March wedding!!

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Posted: 20 September 2011 08:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I, too, had great success.  Each tier of my cake was frozen for a few weeks (very well wrapped).  It worked out, too, to have them slowly defrost in insulated boxes as they were being transported in my car 200 miles and sitting overnight.  I assembled and did finishing scrolls onsite. I vote for fill and coat!  In my experience, un-frosted layers dry out more.

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Posted: 20 September 2011 07:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Yay, I love those answers!

So if you have your tiers in the freezer and they are filled and only crumb-coated (say 6/8/10 pr 6/9/12) I know that many here have said that it can take up to 9 hours to come to room temp but I don’t need it all the way warm.. but if I still need to do the final frosting of buttercream and decorate, and the wedding is on a Saturday, could I move from freezer to fridge say Thursday morning and then frost and decorate on Friday, keep in fridge till Saturday?  Or is that too much time? I guess I’m worried about the cake drying out once it hits the fridge, but probably not? I’ve never done the pre-freezing so I’m just not sure what kind of time frame I should be looking at, open to any suggestions!! Thank you!!!!

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Posted: 20 September 2011 11:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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That should be fine.  Your plan will work with no problem.  The most important thing is that the frosting seals in the moisture, and a crumb coat might not completely cover the cake, so you want to wrap it very well and leave it well-wrapped until you are ready to frost—this way, you won’t have to worry about it becoming dry. 

One baker here does this awesome thing for a perfectly smooth coat—I wish I could remember who offhand—she frosts her cake (but not the piping) and then freezes it.  Then, when she’s ready to complete it, she puts a vert thin sort of—no texactly layer—but it fills-in all the imperfections becuase the main frosted undercoat won’t shift, so her little thin coat can fill it all in.  It’s amazing!  So you can also consider doing that, or applying all frosting except the piping, rather than just the undercoat.

If you do go with just undercoat, as long as everything’s well wrapped, though, you will have no trouble with the schedule you propose.  Even 3 days in the fridge will be fine.  Truly, eating the same cake (well-wrapped slices) over several days, I have found they improve with time in the fridge.

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Posted: 20 September 2011 11:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thanks Anne! How did you know I was re-reading every post since 2008 and hitting refresh till you or someone replied?!

I feel a bit awful about asking so many questions, I hope I can share “my” knowledge soon.. I do more fondant than bc cakes…. I swear, making wedding cakes can turn you into a mad person easily, no matter how much you love it smile

Hmmm…. I would love to hear more about this *awesome* technique.

Thank you smile
Sarah

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Posted: 21 September 2011 10:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Are you kidding?  I ask so many questions before baking a cake, I drive even myself crazy!  So, ask away.

Here’s the post that discusses the *awesome technique*  - http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/index_ee.php/forums/viewthread/3530/

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Posted: 21 September 2011 08:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Thanks Anne! That is a great post - makes it seem so easy smile I refuse to frost with cc ... it has never worked out for me as a frosting, only as a filling…  inspiring post.

The owner of my favorite cake supply store told me today that she NEVER puts her cakes in the freezer and lectured me on doing so and said she can always tell when a cake was frozen (and I will say she is very talented and I have a lot of respect for her and her work..) but I feel pretty confident in doing so from my own limited experience and from others who have done so on this forum.  All I could say was, “I really hope you will not be attending this wedding.” lol.

Thanks again smile Sarah

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Posted: 22 September 2011 12:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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I had 3 tiers 12” square; and one 7"square.  After 27 hours out of freezer, cool June weather, boxes lined with 2” rigid insulation) plus a couple of hours out of the box, being gussies up, arranged, then on display, the 12 inch tiers were cold at the core.  I had an instant-read thermometer stuck in one to keep tabs on it.  Live and learn!

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Posted: 22 September 2011 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Sarahmdr - 21 September 2011 11:36 PM

The owner of my favorite cake supply store told me today that she NEVER puts her cakes in the freezer and lectured me on doing so and said she can always tell when a cake was frozen

That’s so funny, because I prefer a cake that’s been frozen!  I don’t know if the flavors balance, or the moisture develops or what!  Just goes to show that you’ll always make SOMEONE happy, even if you can’t please everyone!

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