Eggy Cookie
Posted: 27 July 2011 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hey all!
I have a chocolate-wafer recipe that I love but the only problem is that it tastes a little eggy.
It has only one egg and it bakes at 375 for 9 minutes.
I used one large egg and baked a batch at 375 for 9 minutes, and another batch at 180.
What could be the problem?

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Posted: 28 July 2011 12:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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McBrownie - 27 July 2011 05:17 PM

Hey all!
I have a chocolate-wafer recipe that I love but the only problem is that it tastes a little eggy.
It has only one egg and it bakes at 375 for 9 minutes.
I used one large egg and baked a batch at 375 for 9 minutes, and another batch at 180.
What could be the problem?

I have a hard time imagining that only one egg would make a cookie taste eggy, unless it’s a very small batch.  You might consider replacing the egg with just the yolk; supposedly it’s the white that’s responsible for the eggy flavor.

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Posted: 28 July 2011 01:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Thanks!
The full ingredient list is: 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup unsweetened Dutch process cocoa, 1 teaspoon baking soda, 1/4 teaspoon baking powder, 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1 cup sugar mixed togetherin a mixer, then the butter is added,  then the egg.
Could it be that i under mixed the dough or under baked the cookies?

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Posted: 28 July 2011 10:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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McBrownie - 28 July 2011 04:29 AM

Thanks!
The full ingredient list is: 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup unsweetened Dutch process cocoa, 1 teaspoon baking soda, 1/4 teaspoon baking powder, 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1 cup sugar mixed togetherin a mixer, then the butter is added,  then the egg.
Could it be that i under mixed the dough or under baked the cookies?

Hmmm, that’s an odd mixing procedure.  It looks to be the equivalent to the two-stage mixing method that Rose uses for her cakes.  Mix the fat in with the flour first, then the liquids.  I would expect that it would make a tender cookie.  It wouldn’t surprise me that it would be easy to undermix that dough.  Normally, we want to minimize the mixing after adding the flour, but we usually add flour to an already wet mixture, the butter and eggs.  Here, you’re adding the wetness to flour coated with fat, so it might easily withstand more mixing than we normally do to cookies.  BTW, the baking soda is odd in this recipe; there’s nothing for it to react with.  It needs an acid to generate carbon dioxide bubbles.  If you were using “natural” cocoa, that would work, but you’re using “Dutch”, which is alkaline, rather than acidic.  Could the off flavor you detect be “soapy”, rather than “eggy”?

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Posted: 28 July 2011 11:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Yes, It IS odd!
But since Rose does it, I thought it would be okay for cookies as well.
Today I made the recipe again and I really beat very thoroughly after the butter and egg were inside the flour mixture.
It still tasted and smelled a little eggy.
That’s a good point about the soda, it is odd there. I’m not sure if I can link to where i got the recipe from [site rules], but the original recipe is by Wayne Brachman in Retro Desserts. But the aftertaste is definitely eggy, not soapy..
I have no idea why it is there since the wafer don’t even need to rise; they should remain flat.

Anyway I think next time I’ll omit the egg white. But aren’t those 30 grams of white kinda important? If all they do is provide a liquid binder then i guess i could add another egg yolk or add some milk; But maybe the white has some other binding or baking virtue?

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Posted: 28 July 2011 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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McBrownie - 28 July 2011 02:17 PM

But since Rose does it, I thought it would be okay for cookies as well.
Today I made the recipe again and I really beat very thoroughly after the butter and egg were inside the flour mixture.
It still tasted and smelled a little eggy. That’s a good point about the soda, it is odd there. I’m not sure if I can link to where i got the recipe from [site rules], but the original recipe is by Wayne Brachman in Retro Desserts. But the aftertaste is definitely eggy, not soapy..
I have no idea why it is there since the wafer don’t even need to rise; they should remain flat.

Anyway I think next time I’ll omit the egg white. But aren’t those 30 grams of white kinda important? If all they do is provide a liquid binder then i guess i could add another egg yolk or add some milk; But maybe the white has some other binding or baking virtue?

Your recipe may need the water content of the white.  Still, I’ve seen a number of recipes that call for only a yolk, but they’re often going for a crumbly sort of cookie, which may not be what you want.  I had assumed when you said “wafer” you wanted a flat cookie, so I also thought it was odd that there was so much baking soda and powder when you really didn’t want a puffy cookie.  But it does explain why the recipe doesn’t call for creaming the butter.

Depending on how interested you are in experimenting, I’d consider leaving out the baking soda in the name of science.

Please keep us informed of your results.


Edit:

Here’s a link to the recipe on the food network:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/wayne-harley-brachman/50s-chocolate-wafer-whipped-cream-roll-recipe/index.html

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Posted: 04 August 2011 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Okay; So I have baked yet another batch, this time replacing the whole egg with 2 egg yolks with 1/2 tsp espresso powder dissolved in 1 tablespoon milk, and 1 tsp vanilla [which weighed together 50 grams].
First of all I was short of a few grams of Dutch cocoa which I did not replaced, so the side by-side comparisons may be a little biased [because the cocoa is perhaps responsible].
So texture-wise, the recent cookies were a tad richer. When i bit into the cookie it didn’t feel like a thin, crisp, maybe a little airy, cookie. It felt like it had a little more of a “bite”; like it had a sturdier strcuture.
By the way, the cookie dough looked unbelievable, smooth and creamy, and when i scooped it it had an ice-cream-ish feel about it.

Anyway, the traces of “egginess” were virtually gone. I couldn’t smell it and couldn’t taste it, though my mom did “felt” the egg. But she does like it, in contrary to the eggy cookies before.

That’s it! I don’t think I’ll experiment again anytime soon, but maybe this thread will help someone in the future.
Thanks CharlesT for your help smile

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Posted: 04 August 2011 12:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Thanks for reporting back.  So, I couldn’t tell, but were *you* satisfied with the cookie, or did you not like the new texture?

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Posted: 04 August 2011 02:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Oh, yes!
Both the texture and the taste appealed to me.
The only downside is that I ran out of dutch so the chocolate flavor was not as deep, but that’s a technical issue—the modified recipe is definitely a keeper.

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Posted: 12 November 2012 11:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Hmm, So I have made quite a few cookies since this thread, and the problem persists in some cases, which led me to believe it’s the baking soda. Maybe the “eggy” taste is not the egg, but in fact a “soapy” taste?! Who want an eggy soap?? wink
Anyway, I think most of the recipes that had problems were ones that specified ingredients by volume.
So I have a theory: Maybe there’s not enough flour per baking soda, so some of the b. soda doesn’t evaporate? That is, assuming the baking soda interacts with the flour [which sounds reasonable].
So my question is-  how much baking soda can, say, 100g of flour take?
I know that, assuming everything i said makes sense scientifically, there are a lot more factors to consider, but it would be nice to know, as a general rule.
Does anybody know, or know how to know? smile

Thanks in advance!

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Posted: 13 November 2012 09:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I was always a bit skeptical about the “eggy” flavor because I’ve never detected it in a cookie before. They’re so dry, I’d think it would be hard to pick up. But then, I don’t have the most sensitive palate in the world, so it’s not my place to say. Regarding the baking soda, you really can’t say how much per unit of flour you need; you need enough baking soda to react with whatever acid you have in the recipe. If that isn’t enough leavening, you’d need to add some baking powder. If you suspect it may be a soapy taste, just reduce the soda by 1/4 teaspoon and see what happens. If you want to be safe, add a teaspoon of baking powder to compensate. Cookies seem to be pretty forgiving regarding the leavening; some don’t have any at all and come out perfectly fine.

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Posted: 14 November 2012 09:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Hmm. Does that mean that baking soda 4 times “stronger” [or more potent] than baking powder?

The thing is, I was making Alexis Stewart’s chocolate-chip-cookies some time ago and besides the fact that the cookies didn’t come out way too thin and ‘lacey’, that weird taste was there. So I contacted Alexis and she told me to add a bit more flour- which miraculously solved both of the problems. Add that to some America’s Test Kitchen episode that said that in order to achieve a thin, crisp cookie, you need to enough baking soda but not enough so there will be “left-over”—I instantly thought that was the problem.
But you’re right, now that I think about it, probably the heat, and the sugar, and even the flour and dairy affects the acidity level. I think reducing some of the baking soda is the right idea.
Thanks!
I will update if I will find anything.

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Posted: 14 November 2012 02:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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McBrownie - 14 November 2012 01:32 PM

Hmm. Does that mean that baking soda 4 times “stronger” [or more potent] than baking powder?

Correct.

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