Best Food Processor?
Posted: 07 August 2011 12:03 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m in the market for a food processor and have been doing some research but would love suggestions from anyone who has an outstanding processor to recommend. I want to use it for baking primarily (cakes, bread, etc) as well as other types of cooking. I want something that will last me for a long while but isn’t too expensive (under $350 would be great). Also, I’m interested in one with a fairly large cup capacity (or ideally, one that has the feature where you can switch out the bowl sizes). Any suggestions? Thank you!!!

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Posted: 07 August 2011 11:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I love my Kitchen Aid (it’s a large capacity—10 or 12 cup?).  It has multiple bowls (unfortunately you always need the large bowl and it gets dirty sometimes),  a huge assortment of attachments, and two sizes of feeding tubes.  I do a lot of pastry in it, a little bit of bread and other miscellaneous things.  I know Rose likes the cuisinarts—haven’t tried myself so I can’t comment.  I dislike washing the parts by hand but have found they come really clean if I put in the dishwasher (there are some “inner workings” that are not fully sealed and get scuzzy though—wouldn’t matter if you hand wash or dishwasher though for that).

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Posted: 08 August 2011 09:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I have been underwhelmed by my food processor, but not because it is any particular brand.  I suspect it works as well as most (KA).  Perhaps it is because I acquired one so late in the game that I was used to doing many things without it.  I know there are many who use theirs a lot and like it.  For me, it seems like there just aren’t many tasks that it excels at.  I prefer flaky pie crust made by hand, I’ve never been very successful with bread made in it (mine had poor gluten development), and it doesn’t work well for creating fine powders from nuts or grains.

It does seem to work pretty well for making superfine sugar and it is terrific for making ganache, I always drag it out for that.  The small pieces of chocolate that it creates help ensure a perfectly smooth and foolproof ganache.  It also works well for grating carrots, though I’ll often use my box grater instead to avoid the clean-up. 

I also find that the plastic in mine retains odors and transfers them to sugar, so I need to wash mine by hand and avoid using it for savory items.

I agree with Sherrie that getting one with both a large and small bowl is a good idea, and I would also point out that the capacity is fairly low compared to the volume of the bowl (i.e., they need a fair amount of empty space to keep from leaking ingredients onto the rotor shaft), so go for a larger capacity.

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Posted: 08 August 2011 12:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I should add that I sometimes (as NOT per the manufacturers directions) put some Glad Press N Seal on the top of the bowl, say when I’m chopping chocolate and not needing the feed tube.  It keeps the lid clean and I only have to wash the bowl.  I really, really dislike washing the darn thing!

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