Question about egg yolks
Posted: 10 May 2008 11:08 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I typically keep extra egg yolks (from making meringues and buttercreams) in the freezer for later use in making curds. Does anyone know if it’s ok to use frozen yolks for making genoise?

Just wondering if freezing alters the yolks in some negative way that would prevent them from fully expanding when whipping.

Thanks!

Roxanne

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Posted: 10 May 2008 11:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hector’s the one to answer that question!

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Posted: 10 May 2008 11:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi Roxanne,

I agree… the fabulous Hector would know ....

....but I do note that on page 427 of TCB Rose says you can freeze egg yolks but to stir in 1/2 teaspoon of sugar per yolk (and to ensure you remove the equivalent sugar from your recipe). Then, as she doesn’t specifically say “don’t then use in genoise”... and Rose is so exacting, my assumption would be it’s fine to use….

Happy Baking
Cate

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Posted: 12 May 2008 12:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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i think this has been discussed on the blog. if you go back to the home page you can search for it.

baking911.com also has information on freezing yolks.

jen

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Posted: 12 May 2008 02:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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You definitely need to add sugar to the yolks before freezing otherwise they are gummy/gluey on thawing and the yolks are useless for most baking purposes. (or salt, if you were to use them for a savoury application).

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Posted: 13 May 2008 05:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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The answers are on The Cake Bible, let me just repeat:

I make Golden Genoise, Biscuit de Savoie, Biscuit Roulade, and Butter Cakes, with frozen yolks, with and without sugar.  I recommend sugar, so it is foolproof.  1/2 tsp superfine sugar per yolk.  Substract this sugar from your recipe (I measure the sugar as usual, then with a teaspoon scoop some out).

When sugar is not present, yolks will become gummy/gluey when thawing.  Do not disturb until completely thawed, then run them thru the food processor with some sugar and it will become creamy and incorporated.  A stand mixer at the highest speed would work too.  This prevents the yolk from coagulating into little yolk yellow crumbs.  In fact, even with fresh egg yolks, my Mom always told me that once yolks touch sugar, you must beat right away to prevent coagulation.

I seldom use fresh eggs to make cakes, unless you use duck eggs for taste!

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Posted: 14 May 2008 01:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Thanks Hector!  My yolks always defrost into a thick mass and I didn’t know what to do with them.  I used my processor on the ones I defrosted today to made lemon curd.  It came out perfect.  Awesome tip. thanks

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Posted: 14 May 2008 05:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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so glad you made curd, another good use for frozen yolks.  be sure to try Rose’s new method that leaves you zero residue.

http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/2008/01/as_orange_as_it_gets.html#comment-82299

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Posted: 14 May 2008 10:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thanks Hector.  I use her new method all the time now… it’s wonderful  

I did deviated a little when making the curd this time.  Since I had the eggs and sugar in the food processor already… I added the butter, pulsed it a couple of times, added the lemon juice, pulsed again, then I strained the mixture into a pot (just in case)

I used the lemon curd in a white Genoise made using lemon zest instead of orange zest. I torted and filled the genoise with the lemon curd and frosted it with plain mousseline. (I know…boring)  What flavor would you have added to the mousseline?

Last week, I made the gold genoise and torted / frosted it with lemon curd mousseline.  It was devine.

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Posted: 14 May 2008 04:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Citrus on Genoise is heaven.  I would fill the torted genoise with fruit mousseline (add the curd to the mousseline), then use the same to frost the cake. 

If you prefer a less buttery frosting and love dairy (and if you can refrigerate the cake until serving time), instead of mousseline you could use cloud cream (curd with whipped cream).

Try add ginger zest in combination to the lemon zest.  Ginger does magic to citrus scented Genoise.

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Posted: 14 May 2008 07:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Sounds wonderful. Thanks!  I’ll try it next time.  How much ginger zest do you use?

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