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Banana Refrigerator Cake
Posted: 12 August 2011 12:54 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Has anyone tried baking this cake in a loaf pan (to make banana bread)? What changes, if any, did you make to the recipe? Specifically did you adjust the amount of batter used or change the leavening? I really liked this cake when I made it as a “cake” and was wondering if I could convert it to a “bread”.

Thanks much,
Hanaa
HanaasKitchen.blogspot.com

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Posted: 12 August 2011 09:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I never tried that but a 9 x 2 pan is 8 cups and so is a 9x5 loaf pan.  I would suggest checking the loaf early the first time you make it. My loaves normally take 50-55 minutes to bake.

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Posted: 12 August 2011 11:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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HI, Hanaa!

I did the Cordon Rose banana cake in mini loaf pans (2 c. loaf pans), and it was great.  The only difference between the Cordon and Banan Refridgerator is butter vs. oil.  I also let the filled pans sit on the counter for about 45 minutes to expel some of the leavening so that they’d have domed tops.  You can also reduce the baking powder, but I use the countertop method.  I lick all the bowls and beaters, do all the dishes, then preheat the oven for 20 minutes, then pop them in.  It works great!!!!!

I’ve tried other cakes in the ‘regular’ sized loaf pans using the same method with the almost the same results—the domes aren’t quite as cute.

Good luck!!

—ak

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Posted: 13 August 2011 12:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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@Flour Girl: good observation on the volume of both pans. Thanks!!

@Anne: thanks for writing. I love using my mini loaf pans (2 cups). Cordon Rose Banana definitely sounds interesting. I just read one of your older posts regarding this recipe and you mentioned upping the sour cream to 1/2 cup. I love sour cream in baked goods so I think I’ll give that a try, even though I was initially tempted to try Rose’s suggestion of subbing 20% of the butter with oil. Oh and btw, I love your countertop method. So the bread domes nicely when you do that? Would love to see a picture, if you have any smile

Hanaa
HanaasKitchen.blogspot.com

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Posted: 13 August 2011 12:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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@Anne: one more question, if you don’t mind. Since the banana bread is made with cake flour, I’m wondering if the texture is somewhat on the crumbly side (vs banana breads made with AP flour). Do you have any insight for me on that? Thanks so much!

Hanaa
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Posted: 13 August 2011 12:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hi, Hanaa!

Don’t have any pics of the Cordon Rose banana cake baked as bread, but the pics below are the chocolate bread, perfect pound cake and perfect all american chocolate butter cake.  The first two are designed to be baked as breads, and the third is a ‘regular’ cake baked in a mini-loaf pan using the ‘countertop’ method.  So you can see it has a pretty nice dome for a ckae designed to be bake up flat. 

I used cake flour in mine, and it was just awesome.  It wasn’t crumbly at all.  It was, OMG, the best banana bread you will ever eat.  Don’t skip the lemon rind.  If you can, bake at least a day ahead—it lets the lemon blend—and the lemon takes it from amazing to indescribably heavenly.  Definitely use the optional full quantity of sour cream, also!  The exact amount per recipe in the sort of footnote.  Moist, moist, moist! 

Finally, I love it with all butter and wouldn’t add the 20% oil, myself, but I’ve never tried it that way, either.

—ak

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Posted: 13 August 2011 03:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Anne, you’re the best. Thanks so much for all the pointers and also the pictures. The mini loaf on the right got a really domed top indeed.
So you make a full recipe of Cordon Rose Banana cake (which I believe is for two 9” round pans) and bake it into two mini loaf pans (with them overflowing)? I’m sort of partial to spices in my banana bread so I might split the recipe in half and put spices in one mini loaf and lemon zest in the other, and then decide which one I like best. I’m definitely upping the sour cream, per your recommendation (I just love what that stuff does to baked goods, ha ha).
Thanks again Anne. I hope I’m not taking too much of your time wink

Hanaa
HanaasKitchen.blogspot.com

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Posted: 13 August 2011 04:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Not at all!  I’m glad to help.

The Cordon Rose is one 9x2” pan, and you can use up to 1/2 cup (121 g) per recipe.  (I made a double recipe for my layer cake.)  You can fill the mini bread pans pans about 2/3 full—no more—it will take 3 minis, I think.  There will be a little leftover for a cupcake (you can make a little foil thing to bake it in).

I hope you love it and tell us how they turn out!!!  Feel free to ask any other questions you think of.  Use really ripe bananas!

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Posted: 14 August 2011 12:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thanks again Annie. I will give it a try and let you know how it turns out. I’m really excited about trying it now :D

Hanaa

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Posted: 15 August 2011 09:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Anne,
I have good news and I have good news smile
I made half the recipe (because I only had 1 fully ripe banana). I baked one mini loaf and one really mini loaf. Instead of lemon zest, I used spices. One minor change I made: I used 1 tsp of molasses in the batter for a little color but also to give the spices a little “oomph”. I followed your advice and went with the increased sour cream option, and I let the batter sit in the loaf pans for about 45 minutes (on the counter top) before baking. The loaves were baked at 325 F instead of 350 F since I was using dark-coated loaf pans. Both loaves domed nicely. I couldn’t wait to cut into it, yet I let it cool completely before doing so. The crumb of this bread/cake is amazing. So soft and tender, but sturdy at the same time (probably from the fiber of the banana). Not crumbly at all as I had feared previously. It’s moist with a wonderful banana taste and aroma. I’ve included some pictures.
I have one observation: I noticed a slight discoloration in the slice. If you look closely, you’ll see that the bottom half of the slice is slightly darker than the top half. I’m wondering how to fix this. Should I:
a) should I let the batter sit in the mixer bowl for 45 minutes, give it a final stir and THEN pour it into the loaf pan?
b) bake the loaf pans in the middle of the oven instead of the lower third?

I’d appreciate any comments/thoughts/ideas you might have on this.

Thanks again,
Hanaa
HanaasKitchen.blogspot.com

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Posted: 15 August 2011 11:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Oooh, that’s pretty!  Thanks for posting pics!!! Mine did the same thing, color-wise, on the loaves, FWIW.

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Posted: 16 August 2011 08:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Looks like a nice loaf!  I’m also thinking that it’s the long sit on the counter that contributes to the loaf being darker on the bottom.  Instead of letting it sit, consider reducing the baking powder (but not the soda) and then baking right away.  I’m away from my books, so please excuse me if this recipe doesn’t contain both soda and powder.

I think letting the batter sit in the bowl, then stirring it, might result in a denser texture, which may or may not be what you’re looking for.

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Posted: 16 August 2011 11:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Thanks Anne and Julie.

@Julie: interesting theory. The recipe contains both baking powder and baking soda. I’ll give your suggestion a try because taste wise this bread was amazing. I just need to work on the “visual” issues smile

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Posted: 16 August 2011 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Great idea, Julie!  I didn’t think anything would happen differently from “sitting” over “reducing,” but my cake didn’t have the color variation, so that probably is the problem. 

Hanaa—Letting it sit on the counter is just a way to ‘expel’ some of the baking powder (in effect, reducing it), so that’s why you can simply reduce and bake.  Not sure how much, though, but if I had to guess, I’d say reduce by 1/4 tst per 9x2 layer equivalent!

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Posted: 16 August 2011 04:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Can I just say I’m loving this discussion smile (I’m such a geek!). I will reduce the baking powder and bake the loaf right away and see what happens! Thank you so much ladies!!

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Posted: 16 August 2011 04:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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@Anne: I may be wrong but I thought letting the batter sit on the counter is a way to expel the baking soda (which becomes active when it comes in contact with liquids). The baking powder will be expelled a little bit too but since it’s double acting, it would be re-activated in the oven. Could you straighten me out? smile

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