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Posted: 11 September 2011 07:00 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hey,

Can u guys help me understand this? I read that longer cook time for baking in smaller pans… bec. of batter being deeper. But also read ..bake in smaller pans less cook time. What am i missing here? Help…thanks ahead of time.

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Posted: 11 September 2011 10:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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sugar blossom - 11 September 2011 10:00 PM

Can u guys help me understand this? I read that longer cook time for baking in smaller pans… bec. of batter being deeper. But also read ..bake in smaller pans less cook time. What am i missing here? Help…thanks ahead of time.

You need to take into account the assumptions behind each statement.  If you have a constant quantity of batter, then a smaller pan will have deeper batter.  But if you adjust the quantity of batter to the pan size, the depth will remain the same.

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Posted: 11 September 2011 11:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Yes to what Charles said.  A 9x3” pan filled halfway will take longer to bake than a 9x2” pan filled halfway (one has 1-1/2” batter, the other 1” batter), but a 6x2” pan will take less time half filled than a 9x2” pan half filled—same depth of batter, but a smalller pan.

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Posted: 12 September 2011 12:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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on a cake mix box it says cake mix will fit in two 8 rounds and a 13x9 x2 same bake time ...but when I do the 2rx3.14 on round i come up with 200.48 and on 13x9 come up with 234… how can the cake mix bake time be the same? (8 inch rounds are 2 deep too)

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Posted: 12 September 2011 12:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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sugar blossom - 12 September 2011 03:21 AM

on a cake mix box it says cake mix will fit in two 8 rounds and a 13x9 x2 same bake time ...but when I do the 2rx3.14 on round i come up with 200.48 and on 13x9 come up with 234… how can the cake mix bake time be the same?

Assuming that the bake times are accurate, one thing to consider is that the center batter in the 13x9 is further away from the sides of the pan than in the 8” rounds, so that will somewhat compensate for shallower batter.

But I’d take the bake times with a grain of salt, anyway.  They’re done when they’re done.

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Posted: 12 September 2011 12:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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does any one know how to calc. total surface area on a 13x9x2 pan and two 8x2 rounds? Would u be able to show me… break it down so i could use it.
thanks Is this the best way to fig. out pans when sub. them? Also curious how would u fig. a cupcake tin too? Thank so much for any help.

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Posted: 12 September 2011 02:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I think you already know from your previous post—pi x r[squared] for the rounds, LxW for the rectangle.  Always compare pans of the same depth, though.  Note, also, that most of Rose’s recipes will not bake in 3” deep pans.  Also, just because you can scale, doesn’t mean it always works.  It usually works scaling down (but you must increase baking powder a bit to keep the cake from doming (unless you want it to, like a cupcake or bread), but scaling up to any large degree (i.e., more than 1”—and even that) is very often experimental (and requires a decrease in baking powder to strengthen the strucutre for the larger span across the pan), so best to test.

  For cupcakes, look at one of Rose’s recipes that’s based on a regular cake and you can figure it from that—The mud turtle cupcakes from RHC use the Chocolate Domingo Cake—so you can say okay, 1/2 a recipe (or whatever) designed for this size pan will make this many cupcakes.

If you look in Rose’s wedding cake sections, though, many of the recipes give directions for various sized pans, since wedding cakes are usually tiered.

Good luck!!!

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Posted: 12 September 2011 02:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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That only computes the surface area of the pan bottom; there is also the surface area of the sides if you want a complete answer.  You’d need the formula for the perimeter of the circle and rectangles and multiply them by the height.

Regardless, I think this sort of analysis doesn’t serve much purpose, given that the answer is so easily empirically determined.  Just set your timer to go off very early and then check the cakes with a toothpick every few minutes.

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Posted: 12 September 2011 03:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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CharlesT - 12 September 2011 05:35 PM

That only computes the surface area of the pan bottom.

Agreed—That’s why I mentioned that it assumes pans of the same depth.  I think equal volume doesn’t always work—i.e., a deep pan of the same volume of a shallow pan has all kinds limitations.  Of course, wide-swinging pan variations do, too, esp. if you’re going bigger, rather than smaller.

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Posted: 12 September 2011 03:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Anne in NC - 12 September 2011 06:07 PM

That?s why I mentioned that it assumes pans of the same depth.  I think equal volume doesn?t always work

I inferred that you were talking volume, whereas she said “surface area”, which is different.  Surface area is just the square footage of the exterior of the pan, not how much space it encloses.  A square pan will have more metal for the same volume than a round pan of the same volume. That’s why the Death Star was a sphere.  wink

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Posted: 12 September 2011 03:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Dig you!!!!!

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Posted: 12 September 2011 03:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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so do you all just do it that way with tooth pick and forget about the calc.

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Posted: 12 September 2011 04:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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I do, more or less.  I’ll start checking at a time that seems reasonable, which is subjective.  Usually, I’ll just peek at it through the glass then—if it’s obviously still looking rather delicate on top, I won’t check it.  Once it starts looking like it could conceivably be done, then I start checking it.  This way, you don’t open the oven too much.  Once it seems done but isn’t quite done, I check at 3 minute intervals.

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Posted: 13 September 2011 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Well than i guess i will throw out the worrying on doing the calc. and just do the toothpick thing along with eyes and nose. Now this will work for all things…. no matter size of pan, volume and depth of pan etc… nothing more i shoud know since i am kind of new to the baking world?

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Posted: 13 September 2011 02:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Hi, Sugar Blossom!

It will not always work.  Per my earlier posts, certain deviations in size and depth produce unexpected results, so always know you are experimenting, and others can require adjustments to baking powder.  However, if you are using mixes (rather than scratch baking), the mixes can be a bit more forgiving.

—ak

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