Bread
Posted: 27 September 2011 09:53 AM   [ Ignore ]
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I was selected as a tester for the new Brod and Taylor folding bread proofer.  This product is terrific, especially for people like me with tiny apartments.  Rose had a blog posting about it, I sent them an email and I was selelcted!  My first loaf of bread, EVER, was a brioche loaf.  (this isn’t one of Rose’s recipes…as I do not YET have the bread bible.  i will be picking it up asap.

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Posted: 27 September 2011 09:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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And….here’s the slice

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Posted: 27 September 2011 12:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Hi Bill, That bread looks delicious.  So you would purchase that folding bread proofer?

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Posted: 27 September 2011 12:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I’m not sure I see much point to the device.  The ideal proofing temperature is about 75 degrees, which is where I normally keep my house.  In general, the slower the fermentation, the better the flavor of the bread, so I normally avoid trying accelerate the process.  More often, I’m trying to slow it down by retarding it in the refrigerator.

I’d be much more interested if the temperature settings went down to something like 50 degrees; fermentation would slow down dramatically, but would continue, whereas it practically stops inside my refrigerator once the dough becomes fully chilled.

If I’m on a tight schedule, like having to show up at a dinner party, and I’ve misjudged by baking schedule, then I may place the dough on a heating pad set on low.

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Posted: 27 September 2011 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I think I would buy it.  The thing is…especially in NYC…we don’t have any control over the temperature in our apartments (except in very new buildings).  In the winter especially…the apartments can be crazy cold…or rediculously hot.  Also, it seems to be a great product for melting chocolate and keeping it in temper

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Posted: 27 September 2011 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Bill,

That is so curious!  Why don’t you have temperature control?  Is it like in school or office buildings where the temp is set “somwhere,” and, despite fidding with thermostats to no avail, there are warmer and colder hallways?  Or is it that the insulation is very poor and, despite your theoretical control, whether the heat/cold is retained is erratic?

—ak

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Posted: 27 September 2011 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Bill - 27 September 2011 03:40 PM

we don?t have any control over the temperature in our apartments

That’s mind-boggling.

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Posted: 27 September 2011 03:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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One thermostat for the entire building.  the president of the condo board lives on the top floor…in an apartment with a lot of glass, and he and his wife are in their 80’s and are always cold…therefore the entire building roasts all winter.  AHHHHHHHHHH! The newer buildings have central air that you can turn on and off in the summer, but we have small airconditioning units that go in a sleeve through the wall…one in each room.  So in the summer you can turn them on and off…but with respect to heat…there is one thermostat for the ENTIRE BUILDING…and I live in a building with about 100 apartments in a pretty posh part of town…and well, there you have it.

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Posted: 27 September 2011 03:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Bill. That is a lovely loaf of bread. Great shape and spring.
There are thermostat controls that can be added individually to radiators and they aren’t that expensive. If you had them installed in even a couple of your larger public rooms it would improve your comfort.

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Posted: 27 September 2011 04:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Believe it or not…we don’t have radiators.  That would be fine, because you can turn them off.  We have hot water baseboard heating. (very unusual for apartment buildings in Manhattan.). No winning, I guess.

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Posted: 27 September 2011 05:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Of all the members of the forum, your living space makes news quite regularly!!  LOL  I am getting more and more curious about your dwelling, Bill.  Ummm. Bread looks great!

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Posted: 27 September 2011 05:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Ooooh, hot water baseboard heating!  That’s fairly awesome.  I must say, I’d rather go around my house in my bathing suit in the winter than be cold!  We had hot water running through the pipes in the floor in my folks’ house in PA, and it was always wonderful to be able to go barefoot in the winter.  My condo is a first floor slab, and I can assure you, I would never attempt that here!!

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Posted: 27 September 2011 08:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Your brioche loaf looks awesome.  Its so high.  I finally managed to make Rose’s brioche recipe and used it to make monkey bread about a week ago.  But before I could take any pictures, four little hands got at it, and well, a third of it disappeared within a half hour.  I can now full appreciate all the hoopla surrounding this bread.  Not to mention it was heaven with a cinammon, brown sugar and pecan coating.

Even though you have such small quarters, you produce some wonderful baked goods. 

I wouldn’t mind buying one of these just for melting chocolate and keeping it in temper.  I hate tempering chocolate, and I have only be sucessful a hand full of time.

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Posted: 27 September 2011 09:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Bill, your brioche looks absolutely perfect!  Congratulations on a job well done.

I’m with Liza, I think it would be great for bread, but even better for chocolate- bringing a chunk to about 80F for making curls, melting without losing its temper- all very appealing uses.

Just curious, what is the range of temperatures on your model?

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Posted: 28 September 2011 01:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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My kitchen is very cold in the winter, and I would think many others’ are, too. I typically have some steaming water in with the rising dough, but it’s all a bit of a pain. I don’t have a gas oven, so that trick of using the pilot light heat doesn’t work for me.

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Posted: 28 September 2011 06:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Thanks for all your compliments on the Brioche.  I actually don’t have a computer at home (I try to live a quiet tech free life with what little time I get at home…and I am taking a mini “staycation”...not going anywhere…but not working for about a week…so I don’t have the specific temperatures…sorry.  I will try to remember to post it when I return.

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